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Author Evans, J.A.; Elliott, J.A.; Gorman, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Dim nighttime illumination accelerates adjustment to timezone travel in an animal model Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Current Biology : CB Abbreviated Journal Curr Biol  
  Volume 19 Issue 4 Pages R156-7  
  Keywords *Adaptation, Physiological; Animals; Behavior, Animal/physiology; Biological Clocks/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cricetinae; Humans; *Lighting; Mesocricetus; Mice; Motor Activity/physiology; Phodopus; *Photoperiod; Time Factors  
  Abstract Jetlag reflects a mismatch between local and circadian time following rapid timezone travel [1]. Appropriately timed bright light can shift human circadian rhythms but recovery is slow (e.g., 1-2 days per timezone). Most symptoms subside after resynchronization, but chronic jetlag may have enduring negative effects [2], including even accelerated mortality in mice [3]. Melatonin, prescription drugs, and/or exercise may help shift the clock but, like bright light, require complex schedules of application [1]. Thus, there is a need for more efficient and practical treatments for addressing jetlag. In contrast to bright daytime lighting, nighttime conditions have received scant attention. By incorporating more naturalistic nighttime lighting comparable in intensity to dim moonlight, we demonstrate that recovery after simulated jetlag is accelerated when nights are dimly lit rather than completely dark.  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0960-9822 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19243688 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 152  
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Author Evans, J.A.; Carter, S.N.; Freeman, D.A.; Gorman, M.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Dim nighttime illumination alters photoperiodic responses of hamsters through the intergeniculate leaflet and other photic pathways Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Neuroscience  
  Volume 202 Issue Pages 300-308  
  Keywords Animals; Biological Clocks/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/physiology; Cricetinae; Darkness; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Geniculate Bodies/*physiology; *Lighting; Male; Motor Activity/physiology; Phodopus; *Photoperiod; Visual Pathways/*physiology  
  Abstract In mammals, light entrains the central pacemaker within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through both a direct neuronal projection from the retina and an indirect projection from the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) of the thalamus. Although light comparable in intensity to moonlight is minimally effective at resetting the phase of the circadian clock, dimly lit and completely dark nights are nevertheless perceived differentially by the circadian system, even when nighttime illumination is below putative thresholds for phase resetting. Under a variety of experimental paradigms, dim nighttime illumination exerts effects that may be characterized as enhancing the plasticity of circadian entrainment. For example, relative to completely dark nights, dimly lit nights accelerate development of photoperiodic responses of Siberian hamsters transferred from summer to winter day lengths. Here we assess the neural pathways underlying this response by testing whether IGL lesions eliminate the effects of dim nighttime illumination under short day lengths. Consistent with previous work, dimly lit nights facilitated the expansion of activity duration under short day lengths. Ablation of the IGL, moreover, did not influence photoperiodic responses in animals held under completely dark nights. However, among animals that were provided dimly lit nights, IGL lesions prevented the short-day typical expansion of activity duration as well as the seasonally appropriate gonadal regression and reduction in body weight. Thus, the present data indicate that the IGL plays a central role in mediating the facilitative effects of dim nighttime illumination under short day lengths, but in the absence of the IGL, dim light at night influences photoperiodic responses through residual photic pathways.  
  Address Department of Psychology, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. jevans@msm.edu  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN 0306-4522 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes PMID:22155265; PMCID:PMC3578228 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 87  
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Author Kyba C.C.M., Ruby A., Kuechly H.U., Kinzey B., Miller N., Sanders J., Barentine J., Kleinodt R., Espey B. doi  openurl
  Title (up) Direct measurement of the contribution of street lighting to satellite observations of nighttime light emissions from urban areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Lighting; Energy  
  Abstract Nighttime light emissions are increasing in most countries worldwide, but which types of lighting are responsible for the increase remains unknown. Also unknown is what fraction of outdoor light emissions and associated energy use are due to public light sources (i.e. streetlights) or various types of private light sources (e.g. advertising). Here we show that it is possible to measure the contribution of street lighting to nighttime satellite imagery using ‘smart city’ lighting infrastructure. The city of Tucson, USA, intentionally altered its streetlight output over 10 days, and we examined the change in emissions observed by satellite. We find that streetlights operated by the city are responsible for only 13% of the total radiance (in the 500–900 nm band) observed from Tucson from space after midnight (95% confidence interval 10–16%). If Tucson did not dim their streetlights after midnight, the contribution would be 18% (95% confidence interval 15–23%). When streetlights operated by other actors are included, the best estimates rise to 16% and 21%, respectively. Existing energy and lighting policy related to the sustainability of outdoor light use has mainly focused on street lighting. These results suggest an urgent need for consideration of other types of light sources in outdoor lighting policy.  
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  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3185  
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Author Bailey, F.; Sparks, C.P.; Seabrook, A.H.; Vignoles, W.A.; Trotter, A.P.; Gaster, L.; Cooper, W.R.; Shaw, C.M.; Morris, J.T.; Russell, C.N.; Edgcumbe, K.; Boot, H.L.P.; Dow, J.S.; Fedden, S.E.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Sexton, F.P.; Wilkinson, H.D.; Scott, E.K.; Hollis, E.P.; Pearce, S.L.; Frith, J.; Angus, H.W.; Cooper, A.G.; Moon, O.; Sells, F.; Crews, H.C.; Solomon, M.; Chattock, R.A.; Sumpner, W.E.; Augold, A.E.; Morcom, R.K.; Harrison, H.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Discussion on: “Street lighting by modern electric lamps” Type Journal Article
  Year 1911 Publication Journal of the Institution of Electrical Engineers Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 46 Issue 205 Pages 46-91  
  Keywords Lighting; Commentary  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2054-0612 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2740  
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Author Marchant, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title (up) Do brighter, whiter street lights improve road safety? Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Significance Abbreviated Journal Significance  
  Volume 16 Issue 5 Pages 8-9  
  Keywords Public Safety; Lighting; Statistics  
  Abstract Would a billion‐dollar investment in improved street lighting make Australian roads safer at night? Paul Marchant finds the evidence wanting  
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  ISSN 1740-9705 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2686  
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