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Author Walkling, A.; Schierz, C.
Title Comparison between the CIE and LITG Method for Minimizing Obtrusive Glare Caused by Bright Luminaires in the Field Type (down) Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication In CIE 27th Session Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 139–143
Keywords Lighting
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 650
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Author Yau, K.K.W.
Title Risk factors affecting the severity of single vehicle traffic accidents in Hong Kong Type (down) Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Accident Analysis & Prevention Abbreviated Journal Accident Analysis & Prevention
Volume 36 Issue 3 Pages 333-340
Keywords Lighting; Injury severity; Logistic regression models; Risk factors; Single vehicle accident
Abstract A population-based case–control study was conducted to examine factors affecting the severity of single vehicle traffic accidents in Hong Kong. In particular, single vehicle accident data of three major vehicle types, namely private vehicles, goods vehicles and motorcycles, which contributed to over 80% of all single vehicle accidents during the 2-year-period 1999–2000, were considered. Data were obtained from the newly implemented traffic accident data system (TRADS), which was developed jointly by the Transport Department, Police Force and Information Technology Services Department, Hong Kong. The effect of district, human, vehicle, safety, environmental and site factors on injury severity of an accident was examined. Unique risk factors associated with each of the vehicle types were identified by means of stepwise logistic regression models. For private vehicles, district board, gender of driver, age of vehicle, time of the accident and street light conditions are significant factors determining injury severity. For goods vehicles, seat-belt usage and weekday occurrence are the only two significant factors associated with injury severity. For motorcycles, age of vehicle, weekday and time of the accident were determined to be important factors affecting the injury severity. Identification of potential risk factors pertinent to the particular vehicle type has important implications to relevant official organisations in modifying safety measures in order to reduce the occurrence of severe traffic accidents, which would help to promote a safe road environment.
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ISSN 0001-4575 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 651
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Author Krause, G. H.; Weis, E.
Title Chlorophyll fluorescence as a tool in plant physiology. II. Interpretation of fluorescence signals. Type (down) Journal Article
Year 1984 Publication Photosynthesis Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue Pages 139–157
Keywords Lighting
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Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 655
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Author Bauer, S.E.; Wagner, S.E.; Burch, J.; Bayakly, R.; Vena, J.E.
Title A case-referent study: light at night and breast cancer risk in Georgia Type (down) Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication International Journal of Health Geographics Abbreviated Journal Int J Health Geogr
Volume 12 Issue Pages 23
Keywords Human Health; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Breast Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*epidemiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Georgia/epidemiology; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/epidemiology; Middle Aged; Registries; Risk Factors
Abstract BACKGROUND: Literature has identified detrimental health effects from the indiscriminate use of artificial nighttime light. We examined the co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and breast cancer (BC) incidence in Georgia, with the goal to contribute to the accumulating evidence that exposure to LAN increases risk of BC. METHODS: Using Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry data (2000-2007), we conducted a case-referent study among 34,053 BC cases and 14,458 lung cancer referents. Individuals with lung cancer were used as referents to control for other cancer risk factors that may be associated with elevated LAN, such as air pollution, and since this cancer type was not previously associated with LAN or circadian rhythm disruption. DMSP-OLS Nighttime Light Time Series satellite images (1992-2007) were used to estimate LAN levels; low (0-20 watts per sterradian cm(2)), medium (21-41 watts per sterradian cm(2)), high (>41 watts per sterradian cm(2)). LAN levels were extracted for each year of exposure prior to case/referent diagnosis in ArcGIS. RESULTS: Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using logistic regression models controlling for individual-level year of diagnosis, race, age at diagnosis, tumor grade, stage; and population-level determinants including metropolitan statistical area (MSA) status, births per 1,000 women aged 15-50, percentage of female smokers, MSA population mobility, and percentage of population over 16 in the labor force. We found that overall BC incidence was associated with high LAN exposure (OR = 1.12, 95% CI [1.04, 1.20]). When stratified by race, LAN exposure was associated with increased BC risk among whites (OR = 1.13, 95% CI [1.05, 1.22]), but not among blacks (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [0.82, 1.28]). CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest positive associations between LAN and BC incidence, especially among whites. The consistency of our findings with previous studies suggests that there could be fundamental biological links between exposure to artificial LAN and increased BC incidence, although additional research using exposure metrics at the individual level is required to confirm or refute these findings.
Address Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA. secbauer@ufl.edu
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ISSN 1476-072X ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:23594790; PMCID:PMC3651306 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 718
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Author Fonken, L.K.; Finy, M.S.; Walton, J.C.; Weil, Z.M.; Workman, J.L.; Ross, J.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Influence of light at night on murine anxiety- and depressive-like responses Type (down) Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res
Volume 205 Issue 2 Pages 349-354
Keywords Human Health; Animals; Anxiety/*physiopathology; Corticosterone/blood; Depression/*physiopathology; Dietary Sucrose/administration & dosage; Drinking Behavior/physiology; Light/*adverse effects; Lighting; Locomotion/physiology; Male; Maze Learning; Mice; Neuropsychological Tests; Organ Size; Photic Stimulation; *Photoperiod; Random Allocation; Swimming; Testis/pathology
Abstract Individuals are increasingly exposed to light at night. Exposure to constant light (LL) disrupts circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, body temperature, hormones, and the sleep-wake cycle in animals. Other behavioural responses to LL have been reported, but are inconsistent. The present experiment sought to determine whether LL produces changes in affective responses and whether behavioural changes are mediated by alterations in glucocorticoid concentrations. Relative to conspecifics maintained in a light/dark cycle (LD, 16:8 light/dark), male Swiss-Webster mice exposed to LL for three weeks increased depressive-like behavioural responses as evaluated by the forced swim test and sucrose anhedonia. Furthermore, providing a light escape tube reversed the effects of LL in the forced swim test. LL mice displayed reduced anxiety as evaluated by the open field and elevated-plus maze. Glucocorticoid concentrations were reduced in the LL group suggesting that the affective behavioural responses to LL are not the result of elevated corticosterone. Additionally, mice housed in LD with a clear tube displayed increased paired testes mass as compared to LL mice. Taken together, these data provide evidence that exposure to unnatural lighting can induce significant changes in affect, increasing depressive-like and decreasing anxiety-like responses.
Address Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Fonken.1@osu.edu
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ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:19591880 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 749
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