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Author Mammola, S.; Isaia, M.; Demonte, D.; Triolo, P.; Nervo, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial lighting triggers the presence of urban spiders and their webs on historical buildings Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning  
  Volume 180 Issue Pages 187-194  
  Keywords Animals; Lighting  
  Abstract Different spider species living in the urban environment spin their webs on building facades. Due to air pollution, web aggregations entrap dirt particles over time, assuming a brownish-greyish colouration and thus determining an aesthetic impact on buildings and street furniture. In Europe, the most common species causing such an aesthetic nuisance is Brigittea civica (Lucas) (Dictynidae). In spite of the socio-economical relevance of the problem, the ecological factors driving the proliferation of this species in the urban environment are poorly described and the effectiveness of potential cleaning activities has never been discussed in scientific literature. Over one year, we studied the environmental drivers of B. civica webs in the arcades of the historical down-town district of Turin (NW-Italy). We selected a number of sampling plots on arcade ceilings and we estimated the density of B. civica webs by means of digital image analysis. In parallel, we collected information on a number of potential explanatory variables driving the arcade colonization, namely artificial lighting at night, substrate temperature, distance from the main artificial light sources and distance from the river. Regression analysis showed that the coverage of spider webs increased significantly at plots with higher light intensity, with a major effect related to the presence of historical lampposts with incandescent lamps rather than halogen lamps. We also detected a seasonal variation in the web coverage, with significant higher values in summer. Stemming from our results, we are able to suggest good practices for the containment of this phenomenon.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2002  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zhu, X.; Guo, X.; Zhang, J.; Liu, J.; Jiang, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Phosphor-free, color-mixed, and efficient illuminant: Multi-chip packaged LEDs for optimizing blue light hazard and non-visual biological effects Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Optics and Lasers in Engineering Abbreviated Journal Optics and Lasers in Engineering  
  Volume 134 Issue Pages 106174  
  Keywords Lighting; Human Health  
  Abstract Currently many evaluation models on the photobiological effects (PBE) of light sources do not consider the influence of age and luminance on the pupil diameter, which affects the light radiation intensity on the human retina. In this study, the pupil diameter is taken into consideration when evaluating the PBE of several light sources. Moreover, the correction factor M is proposed. The blue light hazard (BLH) efficacy and the circadian rhythm (CR) effects of the daylight at dusk, together with three indoor light sources with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of about 3000 K were evaluated by using a corrected evaluation model. The results show that an incandescent lamp is more photobiologically friendly for humans, despite being inefficient. Based on high wall-plug efficiency (WPE) GaN-based yellow (565 nm, 24.3%@20 A/cm2) and green (522 nm, 41.3%@20 A/cm2) LEDs on silicon substrate, incandescent-like spectrum and phosphor-free color-mixed white LEDs (CM-LEDs) with a general color rendering index (CRI) of 94, a CCT of 2866 K, and an efficiency of 131 lm/W were manufactured by mixing blue, cyan, green, yellow and red LEDs. The PBE evaluation results of such CM-LEDs are superior to those of an incandescent lamp. Moreover, blue light free and candlelight-toned LEDs with an efficiency of 120.3 lm/W, a general CRI of 84, a special CRI R9 of 93.3, and a CCT of 1810 K were fabricated by mixing yellow and red LEDs (R&Y-mixed LEDs). The R&Y-mixed LEDs show no blue light weighted quantities and have a weaker influence on the CR shift. They are photobiologically friendly for humans and suitable for nocturnal indoor and outdoor lighting environments.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0143-8166 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2983  
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Author Jones, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Spillover health effects of energy efficiency investments: Quasi-experimental evidence from the Los Angeles LED streetlight program Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Environmental Economics and Management Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Economics and Management  
  Volume 88 Issue Pages 283-299  
  Keywords Human Health; LED; public health; outdoor lighting; Los Angeles; economics; energy efficiency; breast cancer; fossil fuel carbon emissions  
  Abstract Payback estimates of energy efficiency investments often ignore public health externalities. This is problematic in cases where spillover health effects are substantial, such as when the application of new technology alters environmental exposures. When health externalities are included in return on investment calculations, energy efficiency programs may look more or less attractive than suggested by conventional “energy savings only” estimates. This analysis exploits the quasi-experiment provided by the 2009 Los Angeles (LA) LED streetlight efficiency program to investigate the returns on investments inclusive of an originally estimated health externality. Using the synthetic control method, we find that the LED streetlight program is associated with a lagged increase in breast cancer mortality of 0.479 per 100,000. Inclusive of the effects of LEDs on breast cancer and avoided carbon emissions, the LA LED program provides a −146.2% 10-year return compared to +118.2% when health outcomes and carbon emissions are ignored.  
  Address Department of Economics, University of New Mexico, 1 UNM Drive, MSC 05 3060, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA; bajones(at)unm.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0095-0696 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1976  
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Author Garratt, M.J.; Jenkins, S.R.; Davies, T.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mapping the consequences of artificial light at night for intertidal ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 691 Issue Pages 760-768  
  Keywords Ecology; Lighting  
  Abstract Widespread coastal urbanization has resulted in artificial light pollution encroaching into intertidal habitats, which are highly valued by society for ecosystem services including coastal protection, climate regulation and recreation. While the impacts of artificial light at night in terrestrial and riparian ecosystems are increasingly well documented, those on organisms that reside in coastal intertidal habitats are less well explored. The distribution of artificial light at night from seaside promenade lighting was mapped across a sandy shore, and its consequences for macroinvertebrate community structure quantified accounting for other collinear environmental variables known to shape biodiversity in intertidal ecosystems (shore height, wave exposure and organic matter content). Macroinvertebrate community composition significantly changed along artificial light gradients. Greater numbers of species and total community biomass were observed with increasing illumination, a relationship that was more pronounced (increased effects size) with increasing organic matter availability. Individual taxa exhibited different relationships with artificial light illuminance; the abundances of 27% of non-rare taxa [including amphipods (Amphipoda), catworms (Nephtys spp.), and sand mason worms (Lanice conchilega)] decreased with increasing illumination, while 20% [including tellins (Tellinidae spp.), lugworms (Arenicola marina) and ragworms (Nereididae spp.)] increased. Possible causes of these relationships are discussed, including direct effects of artificial light on macroinvertebrate behaviour and indirect effects via trophic interactions. With increasing light pollution in coastal zones around the world, larger scale changes in intertidal ecosystems could be occurring.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2590  
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Author Pagden, M.; Ngahane, K.; Amin, M.S.R. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Changing the colour of night on urban streets – LED vs. part-night lighting system Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Socio-Economic Planning Sciences Abbreviated Journal Socio-Economic Planning Sciences  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 100692  
  Keywords Energy; Planning; Economics; United Kingdom; LED; Lighting  
  Abstract Many cities in the United Kingdom are upgrading the streetlights to white light-emitting diode (LED) lamps for reducing the electricity costs and attaining the sustainable energy solutions. Installation of LED lamps on urban street requires higher installation costs and a long-term period to payback benefits of replacing outdated streetlights in terms of energy savings and costs. To achieve the short-term energy efficiency of urban street lighting, city councils sometimes adopt the part-night lighting system particularly in the residential areas. The Coventry City Council recently replaced 29,701 existing sodium lights with LED lamps. This paper performs the economic analyses to understand the feasibility of two street lighting systems: LED lamps and ‘part-night’ lightings on the Coventry streets during the twenty-year period assuming the return period of investment is twenty years. The projection of energy consumption and costs for LED lamps and part-night lighting systems shows that electricity can be saved by 44% and 21% comparing to current electricity usages, respectively. Considering the budgetary constraints of Coventry City Council, this paper concludes that the part-night lighting system may be beneficial in short-term period, but it is economically feasible to replace the existing lower efficiency lights with LED lamps.  
  Address Faculty of Engineering, Environment & Computing, Coventry University, Priory St, Coventry, West Midlands, CV1 5FB, United Kingdom; pagdenm(at)uni.coventry.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher English Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0038-0121 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2234  
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