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Author Doulos, L.T.; Sioutis, I.; Kontaxis, P.; Zissis, G.; Faidas, K.
Title A decision support system for assessment of street lighting tenders based on energy performance indicators and environmental criteria: Overview, methodology and case study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society
Volume (down) 51 Issue Pages 101759
Keywords Lighting; Policy
Abstract While LEDs are now the most efficient light sources, their adoption in the road lighting design has been delayed due to a variety of reasons such as malpractice, huge number of inappropriate luminaires, missing technical information and ineffective policies. An example is the, low luminous efficacy values, which confuse the decision makers for national roads. The new part of EN13201-5 describes many energy performance indicators, which are still not used in street light projects or in lighting simulation tools. The aim of this paper is a) to present the significance of using these indicators through a decision tool, capable to evaluate a number of lighting designs in a lighting tender and b) to propose an evaluation method as part of a future energy policy including environmental criteria. A case study is also presented. The results show that the aforementioned decision tool is necessary in order to evaluate the ranking of the corresponding offers. Thus, increased energy savings could be achieved together with environmental benefits. In the case examined, the best solution resulted in 72.1% energy savings and CO2 emission reduction.
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ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium
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Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2609
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Author S Fotios, J Uttley
Title Illuminance required to detect a pavement obstacle of critical size Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 50 Issue Pages 390-404
Keywords Vision; Lighting
Abstract This paper investigates the illuminance needed to detect trip hazards for pedestrians walking after dark. In previous work, it was assumed that the critical obstacle height is 25 mm: further review of accident data and foot clearance data suggests instead that 10 mm is the critical height. Eye tracking records suggest a tendency for obstacles to be detected approximately 3.4 m ahead. Interpretation of obstacle detection data suggests horizontal photopic illuminances of up to 0.9 lux are required for peripheral detection of a 10 mm obstacle 3.4 m ahead, according to the scotopic/photopic ratio of the lighting and the age of the observer.
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Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1765
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Author Fotios, S.; Gibbons, R.
Title Road lighting research for drivers and pedestrians: The basis of luminance and illuminance recommendations Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume (down) 50 Issue 1 Pages 154-186
Keywords Security; Public Safety; Lighting; Review
Abstract This article discusses quantitative recommendations for road lighting as given in guidelines and standards, primarily, the amount of light. The discussion is framed according to the type of road user, the driver and the pedestrian, these being the user groups associated with major and minor roads, respectively. Presented first is a brief history of road lighting standards, from early to current versions, and, where known, the basis of these standards. Recommendations for the amount of light do not appear to be well-founded in robust empirical evidence, or at least do not tend to reveal the nature of any evidence. This suggests a need to reconsider recommended light levels, a need reinforced by recent developments in the science and technology of lighting and of lighting research. To enable improved recommendations, there is a need for further evidence of the effects of changes in lighting: This article therefore discusses the findings of investigations, which might be considered when developing new standards.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1790
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Author Huang, Z.; Liu, Q.; Westland, S.; Pointer, M.; Luo, M.R.; Xiao, K.
Title Light dominates colour preference when correlated colour temperature differs Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume (down) 50 Issue 7 Pages 995-1012
Keywords Vision; Lighting
Abstract Colour preference for lighting is generally influenced by three kinds of contextual factors, the light, the object and the observer. In this study, a series of psychophysical experiments were conducted to investigate and compare the effect of certain factors on colour preference, including spectral power distribution of light, lighting application, observers’ personal colour preference, regional cultural difference and gender difference. LED lights with different correlated colour temperatures were used to illuminate a wide selection of objects. Participant response was quantified by a 7-point rating method or a 5-level ranking method. It was found that the preferred illumination for different objects exhibited a similar trend and that the influence of light was significantly stronger than that of other factors. Therefore, we conclude that the light itself (rather than, e.g. the objects that are viewed) is the most crucial factor for predicting which light, among several candidates with different correlated colour temperatures, an observer will prefer. In addition, some of the gamut-based colour quality metrics correlated well with the participants’ response, which corroborates the view that colour preference is strongly influenced by colour saturation. The familiarity of the object affects the ratings for each experiment while the colour of the objects also influences colour preference.
Address School of Printing and Packaging, Wuhan University, Luoyu Road 129, Wuhan, China; liuqiang(at)whu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2256
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Author Figueiro, M.G.; Nagare, R.; Price, L.L.A.
Title Non-visual effects of light: How to use light to promote circadian entrainment and elicit alertness Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (down) 50 Issue 1 Pages 38-62
Keywords Human Health; Lighting
Abstract In addition to stimulating the visual system, light incident on the retina stimulates other biological functions, also referred to as non-visual responses. Among the most notable biological functions are human circadian rhythms, which are bodily rhythms that, in constant darkness, oscillate with a period close to, but typically slightly longer than 24 hours. Twenty-four-hour light–dark patterns incident on the retina are the major synchroniser of circadian rhythms to the local time on Earth. Entrainment of circadian rhythms has been implicated in health and well-being. Light can also elicit an acute alerting effect on people, similar to a ‘cup of coffee.’ This review summarises the literature on how light affects entrainment and alertness and how it can be used to achieve these aims.
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Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3133
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