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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.
Title Case study of “Walk”: a video installation integrated into the facade of a store in Zurich/CH Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Professional Lighting Design Abbreviated Journal Prof Lighting Des
Volume (up) Issue 101 Pages 52-58
Keywords Lighting; planning; commentary
Abstract With the rapid development of solid state lighting technology and the availability of LED light sources, coupled with the benefits they offer such as energy efficiency, long lifespan and the fact that they can be controlled and programmed, we are now finding LEDs being more widely used for animated advertising. In spite of the pace at which SSL is developing, or perhaps because of this, there is a distinct lack of evaluation guidelines or recommendations for professional designers. It is therefore essential that more research is carried out on this issue on an international scale, and that experts in the field get their heads together in order to formulate some basic guidelines that can be applied in practice.
Address Faculty of Architecture & Design, Hochschule Wismar, Wismar, Germany; k.zielinska-dabkowska(at)hs-wismar.de
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Verlag Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1479
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Author Schroer, S.; Hölker, F.
Title Light Pollution Reduction Type Book Chapter
Year 2014 Publication Handbook of Advanced Lighting Technology Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages
Keywords ligting technology; awareness; skyglow, lighting design
Abstract Artificial light at night is an irreplaceable technology for our society and its activities at nighttime. But this indispensable tool has detrimental side effects, which have only come to light in the past 10–20 years. This chapter reviews ways to implement technology in order to lower the impact of artificial light at night on nature and humans. Further, it provides guidelines for environmental protection and scientific approaches to reduce the increase in light pollution and discusses the urgent need for further research. Measures to prevent obtrusive light and unintentional trespass into homes and natural habitats are

mostly simple solutions like shielding luminaires and predominantly require awareness. Shades are another effective tool to reduce trespass from interior lights. Especially in greenhouses, the use of shades significantly reduces the contribution to skyglow. Artificial light should be switched off whenever it is not needed. Smart, flexible lighting systems can help to use artificial light with precision. The choice of the appropriate illumination has to be balanced by the needs for optimal visibility, human well-being, environmental conservation and protection of the night sky. For visibility, conditions comparable to bright moonlit nights (0.3 lx) are sufficient. Low-level streetlights that produce only 1–3 lx at the surface meet the requirement of facial cognition. Although this light level might be too low for road safety, a consideration of maximum illumination levels in street lighting is recommended. The spectral power distribution of illuminants can impact several environmental parameters. For example, illuminants emitting short wavelengths can sup- press melatonin in higher vertebrates (including humans), are attracting many insect species, and contribute in skyglow above average. Recent findings in different measures for energy efficiency of illuminants at scotopic or mesopic vision conditions compared to photopic conditions indicate that the assessment of lighting products needs fundamental revision. Further research is crucially needed to create refuges for light-sensitive species at night, to measure the impact of artificial light on nature, and also to monitor the improvements of light pollution-reducing measures. Decrees in various regions have helped to lower the impact of artificial light at night significantly. Measures to reduce the impact of artificial light at night need to be carefully balanced with the surrounding environment. Thoughtful guidelines are crucial to reducing the rapid increase in sky brightness worldwide. These guidelines need to be made accessible for decision makers especially in areas which require new light installations.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer International Publishing Place of Publication Editor Karlicek, Robert Sun, Ching-Chern Zissis, Georgis Ma, Ruiqing
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1569
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Author Hölker, Andreas; Doulos, Lambros; Schroer, Sibylle; Topalis, Frangiskos
Title Sustainable outdoor lighting for reducing energy and light waste Type Conference Article
Year 2016 Publication 9th International Conference Improving Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings and Smart Communities Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages 202-213
Keywords lighting design; lighting technology; light pollution
Abstract The lack of lighting planning for internal and external illumination of buildings contributes to wasting energy and to the issue of light pollution. This will be demonstrated with research from the ground and by analysis of images, taken with detectors on satellites, the International Space Station or planes. Besides large area floodlighting from airports or sports facilities, facade illumination is the most important contributor. The effects of malpractice versus sustainable lighting planning solutions will be demonstrated with some examples in cities like Bonn, Strasbourg, Athens and Thessaloniki. Further examples in the countryside will demonstrate lighting practice in the German star park Biosphere Reserve Rhön. Facade lighting planning, considering optimal alignment, the intensity and the colour quality of the illumination, will contribute to reducing light pollution and thus waste of energy and will increase human comfort at the same time.

Experience shows that unilateral promoting energy efficiency will finally result in more extended use of energy, which is known as rebound effect. In addition the small size and long lifetime of the modern solid state lighting will result in an increased use even in remote places thereby emitting more artificial light into the natural night. This does not only affect the energy use, but also the biological rhythms of animals and human beings.

More interdisciplinary criteria for a sustainable lighting with reduced light pollution will be discussed based on the observations including data provided by the EU-network “Loss of the Night”-Network (EU-COST Action ES1204 LoNNe).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher JRC Confernce and workshop reports Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1573
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Author Clanton, N.; Gibbons, R.; Garcia, J.; Barber, M.
Title Seattle LED Adaptive Lighting Study Type Report
Year 2014 Publication Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance Abbreviated Journal NEEA
Volume (up) Issue E14-286 Pages
Keywords Public Safety; Lighting; Planning; Vision
Abstract The Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) and the City of Seattle partnered to evaluate the future of solid state street lighting in the Pacific Northwest with a two-night demonstration in Seattle's Ballard neighborhood in March 2012. The study evaluates the effectiveness of LED streetlights on nighttime driver object detection visibility as function of light source spectral distribution (color temperature in degrees K) and light distribution. Clanton & Associates and VTTI also evaluated adaptive lighting (tuning of streetlights during periods of reduced vehicular and pedestrian activity) at three levels: one hundred percent of full light output, fifty percent of full light output, and twenty-five percent of full light output. The study, led by Clanton & Associates, Continuum Industries, and the VTTI, built upon previous visual performance studies conducted in Anchorage, Alaska; San Diego, California; and San Jose, California. The use of LED technology for city street lighting is becoming more widespread. While these lights are primarily touted for their energy efficiency, the combination of LEDs with advanced control technology, changes to lighting criteria, and a better understanding of human mesopic (low light level) visibility creates an enormous potential for energy savings and improved motorist and pedestrian visibility and safety. Data from these tests support the following statements: LED luminaires with a correlated color temperature of 4100K provide the highest detection distance, including statistically significantly better detection distance when compared to HPS luminaires of higher wattage. The non-uniformity of the lighting on the roadway surface provides a visibility enhancement and greater contrast for visibility. Contrast of objects, both positive and negative, is a better indicator of visibility than is average luminance level. Dimming the LED luminaires to fifty percent of IES RP-8 levels did not significantly reduce object detection distance in dry pavement conditions. Participants perceived dimming of sidewalks as less acceptable than dimming to the same level on the roadway. Asymmetric lighting did reduce glare and performed similarly to the symmetric lighting at the same color temperature (4100K).
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1763
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Author Rice Kinder Institute for Urban Research
Title What Happens in the Shadows: Streetlights and How They Relate To Crime Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume (up) Issue Pages
Keywords Crime; Lighting
Abstract After finding in a previous report, “Streetlights in the City: Understanding the Distribution of Houston Streetlights,” that the city of Houston’s more than 173,000 streetlights were not evenly distributed throughout the city, this next report answers the question: do places with more streetlights have lower crime rates?

The findings complicate the common perception that more streetlights lead to fewer crimes. While there was some evidence that a particularly high density of streetlights can provide protective benefits, excluding those extremes provides a much muddier picture, suggesting that crime is a reflection of other neighborhood contexts. As such, cities should be cautious in expecting direct reductions in crime with the introduction of more streetlights.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1804
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