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Author Kloog, I.; Stevens, R.G.; Haim, A.; Portnov, B.A.
Title Nighttime light level co-distributes with breast cancer incidence worldwide Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control
Volume 21 Issue 12 Pages 2059-2068
Keywords Adult; Birth Rate; Breast Neoplasms/*epidemiology/etiology; Carcinoma/*epidemiology/etiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Cohort Studies; Electricity; Female; Humans; Incidence; *Light/adverse effects; Lighting; Photoperiod; Registries; Urban Population/statistics & numerical data; World Health; oncogenesis
Abstract Breast cancer incidence varies widely among countries of the world for largely unknown reasons. We investigated whether country-level light at night (LAN) is associated with incidence. We compared incidence rates of five common cancers in women (breast, lung, colorectal, larynx, and liver), observed in 164 countries of the world from the GLOBOCAN database, with population-weighted country-level LAN, and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including fertility rate, per capita income, percent of urban population, and electricity consumption. Two types of regression models were used in the analysis: Ordinary Least Squares and Spatial Errors. We found a significant positive association between population LAN level and incidence rates of breast cancer. There was no such an association between LAN level and colorectal, larynx, liver, and lung cancers. A sensitivity test, holding other variables at their average values, yielded a 30-50% higher risk of breast cancer in the highest LAN exposed countries compared to the lowest LAN exposed countries. The possibility that under-reporting from the registries in the low-resource, and also low-LAN, countries created a spurious association was evaluated in several ways and shown not to account for the results. These findings provide coherence of the previously reported case-control and cohort studies with the co-distribution of LAN and breast cancer in entire populations.
Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, University of Haifa, 31905 Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:20680434 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 160
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Author Huang, B.J.; Wu, M.S.; Hsu, P.C.; Chen, J.W.; Chen, K.Y.
Title Development of high-performance solar LED lighting system Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication Energy Conversion and Management Abbreviated Journal Energy Conversion and Management
Volume 51 Issue 8 Pages 1669-1675
Keywords Stand-alone solar system; Off-grid solar system; Solar-powered lighting; LED lighting; Solar LED lighting; LED; outdoor lighting
Abstract The present study developed a high-performance charge/discharge controller for stand-alone solar LED lighting system by incorporating an nMPPO system design, a PWM battery charge control, and a PWM battery discharge control to directly drive the LED. The MPPT controller can then be removed from the stand-alone solar system and the charged capacity of the battery increases 9.7%. For LED driven by PWM current directly from battery, a reliability test for the light decay of LED lamps was performed continuously for 13,200 h. It has shown that the light decay of PWM-driven LED is the same as that of constant-current driven LED. The switching energy loss of the MOSFET in the PWM battery discharge control is less than 1%. Three solar-powered LED lighting systems (18 W, 100 W and 150 W LED) were designed and built. The long-term outdoor field test results have shown that the system performance is satisfactory with the control system developed in the present study. The loss of load probability for the 18 W solar LED system is 14.1% in winter and zero in summer. For the 100 W solar LED system, the loss of load probability is 3.6% in spring.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0196-8904 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 330
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Author Elvidge, C.D.; Keith, D.M.; Tuttle, B.T.; Baugh, K.E.
Title Spectral identification of lighting type and character Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 10 Issue 4 Pages 3961-3988
Keywords Led; Nightsat; lighting efficiency; lighting types; nighttime lights; photopic band
Abstract We investigated the optimal spectral bands for the identification of lighting types and the estimation of four major indices used to measure the efficiency or character of lighting. To accomplish these objectives we collected high-resolution emission spectra (350 to 2,500 nm) for forty-three different lamps, encompassing nine of the major types of lamps used worldwide. The narrow band emission spectra were used to simulate radiances in eight spectral bands including the human eye photoreceptor bands (photopic, scotopic, and “meltopic”) plus five spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared modeled on bands flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM). The high-resolution continuous spectra are superior to the broad band combinations for the identification of lighting type and are the standard for calculation of Luminous Efficacy of Radiation (LER), Correlated Color Temperature (CCT) and Color Rendering Index (CRI). Given the high cost that would be associated with building and flying a hyperspectral sensor with detection limits low enough to observe nighttime lights we conclude that it would be more feasible to fly an instrument with a limited number of broad spectral bands in the visible to near infrared. The best set of broad spectral bands among those tested is blue, green, red and NIR bands modeled on the band set flown on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. This set provides low errors on the identification of lighting types and reasonable estimates of LER and CCT when compared to the other broad band set tested. None of the broad band sets tested could make reasonable estimates of Luminous Efficacy (LE) or CRI. The photopic band proved useful for the estimation of LER. However, the three photoreceptor bands performed poorly in the identification of lighting types when compared to the bands modeled on the Landsat Thematic Mapper. Our conclusion is that it is feasible to identify lighting type and make reasonable estimates of LER and CCT using four or more spectral bands with minimal spectral overlap spanning the 0.4 to 1.0 um region.
Address Earth Observation Group, Solar and Terrestrial Division, NOAA National Geophysical Data Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, CO 80305, USA. chris.elvidge@noaa.gov
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ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:22319336; PMCID:PMC3274255 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 275
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Author Hölker, F.; Moss, T.; Griefahn, B.; Kloas, W.; Voigt, C.; et al.
Title The Dark Side of Light: A Transdisciplinary Research Agenda for Light Pollution Policy Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2010 Publication Ecol Soc Abbreviated Journal
Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages
Keywords Ecology; artificial light; energy efficiency; lighting concept; light pollution; nightscape; policy; sustainability; transdisciplinary
Abstract Although the invention and widespread use of artificial light is clearly one of the most important human technological advances, the transformation of nightscapes is increasingly recognized as having adverse effects. Night lighting may have serious physiological consequences for humans, ecological and evolutionary implications for animal and plant populations, and may reshape entire ecosystems. However, knowledge on the adverse effects of light pollution is vague. In response to climate change and energy shortages, many countries, regions, and communities are developing new lighting programs and concepts with a strong focus on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions. Given the dramatic increase in artificial light at night (0 – 20% per year, depending on geographic region), we see an urgent need for light pollution policies that go beyond energy efficiency to include human well-being, the structure and functioning of ecosystems, and inter-related socioeconomic consequences. Such a policy shift will require a sound transdisciplinary understanding of the significance of the night, and its loss, for humans and the natural systems upon which we depend. Knowledge is also urgently needed on suitable lighting technologies and concepts which are ecologically, socially, and economically sustainable. Unless managing darkness becomes an integral part of future conservation and lighting policies, modern society may run into a global self-experiment with unpredictable outcomes.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 478
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Author Spivey, A.
Title Light at night and breast cancer risk worldwide Type
Year (up) 2010 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect
Volume 118 Issue 12 Pages a525
Keywords Human Health; Breast Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Female; Humans; Lighting/*adverse effects; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/epidemiology/*etiology/prevention & control; Risk Factors
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:21123149; PMCID:PMC3002207 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 813
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