toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Czeisler, C.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Perspective: casting light on sleep deficiency Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 497 Issue 7450 Pages S13  
  Keywords Human Health; Circadian Rhythm/physiology/radiation effects; Electricity/adverse effects; Humans; Jet Lag Syndrome/etiology/physiopathology/therapy; Lighting/*adverse effects; Melatonin/metabolism/secretion; Phototherapy; Sleep Deprivation/epidemiology/*etiology/*physiopathology/therapy; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiology/radiation effects  
  Abstract  
  Address Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, in Boston, Massachusetts, USA. charles_czeisler@hms.harvard.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23698501 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 499  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Eisenstein, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Chronobiology: stepping out of time Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 497 Issue 7450 Pages S10-2  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Benzofurans/therapeutic use; CLOCK Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Circadian Rhythm/genetics/*physiology; Cyclopropanes/therapeutic use; Efficiency/physiology; Humans; Melatonin/agonists/metabolism; Obesity/metabolism; Sleep/genetics/*physiology; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/metabolism  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23698500 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 500  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Filipski, E.; Li, X.M.; Levi, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Disruption of circadian coordination and malignant growth Type Journal Article
  Year 2006 Publication Cancer Causes & Control : CCC Abbreviated Journal Cancer Causes Control  
  Volume 17 Issue 4 Pages 509-514  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Biological Clocks; Body Temperature; Cell Cycle Proteins; Cell Line, Tumor; Chronobiology Disorders/*complications/physiopathology; Circadian Rhythm; Corticosterone/blood; DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism; Jet Lag Syndrome/complications/physiopathology; Lymphocyte Count; Mice; Neoplasm Transplantation; Nuclear Proteins/metabolism; Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group D, Member 1; Osteosarcoma/*pathology/physiopathology; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*pathology/physiopathology; Period Circadian Proteins; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/metabolism; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/physiopathology; Transcription Factors/metabolism  
  Abstract Altered circadian rhythms predicted for poor survival in patients with metastatic colorectal or breast cancer. An increased incidence of cancers has been reported in flying attendants and in women working predominantly at night. To explore the contribution of circadian structure to tumor growth we ablated the 24-h rest-activity cycle and markedly altered the rhythms in body temperature, serum corticosterone and lymphocyte count in mice by complete stereotaxic destruction of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) or by subjecting the mice to experimental chronic jet-lag. Such disruption of circadian coordination significantly accelerated malignant growth in two transplantable tumor models, Glasgow osteosarcoma and Pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The mRNA expression of clock genes per2 and reverb-alpha in controls displayed significant circadian rhythms in the liver (Cosinor, p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively) and in the tumor (p=0.04 and p<0.001, respectively). Both rhythms were suppressed in the liver and in the tumor of jet lagged mice. This functional disturbance of molecular clock resulted in down regulation of p53 and overexpression of c-Myc, two effects which may favor cancer growth. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that circadian system could play an important role in malignant growth control. This should be taken into consideration in cancer prevention and therapy.  
  Address INSERM E 354 Cancer Chronotherapeutics, Hopital Paul Brousse, Villejuif, France. filipski@vjf.inserm.fr  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0957-5243 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:16596304 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 748  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fonken, L.K.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night increases depressive-like responses in male C3H/HeNHsd mice Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Behavioural Brain Research Abbreviated Journal Behav Brain Res  
  Volume 243 Issue Pages 74-78  
  Keywords Affect/physiology; Anhedonia/physiology; Animals; Behavior, Animal/*physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Depression/*etiology/physiopathology; Hippocampus/*metabolism/pathology; Light/*adverse effects; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Neuropsychological Tests; Photoperiod  
  Abstract Daily patterns of light exposure have become increasingly variable since the widespread adoption of electrical lighting during the 20th century. Seasonal fluctuations in light exposure, shift-work, and transmeridian travel are all associated with alterations in mood. These studies implicate fluctuations in environmental lighting in the development of depressive disorders. Here we argue that exposure to light at night (LAN) may be causally linked to depression. Male C3H/HeNHsd mice, which produce nocturnal melatonin, were housed in either a standard light/dark (LD) cycle or exposed to nightly dim (5 lux) LAN (dLAN). After four weeks in lighting conditions mice underwent behavioral testing and hippocampal tissue was collected at the termination of the study for qPCR. Here were report that mice exposed to dLAN increase depressive-like responses in both a sucrose anhedonia and forced swim test. In contrast to findings in diurnal grass rats, dLAN mice perform comparably to mice housed under dark nights in a hippocampus-dependent learning and memory task. TNFalpha and IL1beta gene expression do not differ between groups, demonstrating that changes in these pro-inflammatory cytokines do not mediate dLAN induced depressive-like responses in mice. BDNF expression is reduced in the hippocampus of mice exposed to dLAN. These results indicate that low levels of LAN can alter mood in mice. This study along with previous work implicates LAN as a potential factor contributing to depression. Further understanding of the mechanisms through which LAN contributes to changes in mood is important for characterizing and treating depressive disorders.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0166-4328 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23291153 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 95  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fonken, L.K.; Aubrecht, T.G.; Melendez-Fernandez, O.H.; Weil, Z.M.; Nelson, R.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim light at night disrupts molecular circadian rhythms and increases body weight Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms  
  Volume 28 Issue 4 Pages 262-271  
  Keywords Animals; Blood Glucose/metabolism; Body Weight/*physiology; CLOCK Proteins/biosynthesis/genetics; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Corticosterone/metabolism; Feeding Behavior/physiology; Immunohistochemistry; Light; *Lighting; Male; Mice; Motor Activity; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Suprachiasmatic Nucleus/metabolism/physiology; clock genes; feeding rhythm; light pollution; obesity  
  Abstract With the exception of high latitudes, life has evolved under bright days and dark nights. Most organisms have developed endogenously driven circadian rhythms that are synchronized to this daily light/dark cycle. In recent years, humans have shifted away from the naturally occurring solar light cycle in favor of artificial and sometimes irregular light schedules produced by electric lighting. Exposure to unnatural light cycles is increasingly associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, the means by which environmental lighting alters metabolism are poorly understood. Thus, we exposed mice to dim light at night and investigated changes in the circadian system and metabolism. Here we report that exposure to ecologically relevant levels of dim (5 lux) light at night altered core circadian clock rhythms in the hypothalamus at both the gene and protein level. Circadian rhythms in clock expression persisted during light at night; however, the amplitude of Per1 and Per2 rhythms was attenuated in the hypothalamus. Circadian oscillations were also altered in peripheral tissues critical for metabolic regulation. Exposure to dimly illuminated, as compared to dark, nights decreased the rhythmic expression in all but one of the core circadian clock genes assessed in the liver. Additionally, mice exposed to dim light at night attenuated Rev-Erb expression in the liver and adipose tissue. Changes in the circadian clock were associated with temporal alterations in feeding behavior and increased weight gain. These results are significant because they provide evidence that mild changes in environmental lighting can alter circadian and metabolic function. Detailed analysis of temporal changes induced by nighttime light exposure may provide insight into the onset and progression of obesity and metabolic syndrome, as well as other disorders involving sleep and circadian rhythm disruption.  
  Address Department of Neuroscience and Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, Wexner Medical Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. fonken.1@osu.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23929553; PMCID:PMC4033305 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 28  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: