|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Rea, M. S.; Bierman, A.
Title Spectral considerations for outdoor lighting: Consequences for sky glow Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Lighting Research and Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Res. & Tech.
Volume 47 Issue 8 Pages 920-930
Keywords Lighting; skyglow; spectrum; scattering; aerosol; modeling
Abstract (up) It is well known that the magnitude of sky glow on a clear night depends upon the aerosol content in the atmosphere and the spectral power distribution (amount and spectrum). Sources with a greater proportion of short-wavelength radiation produce more backscattered radiation, but as aerosol density increases, the differential effect of spectrum becomes smaller. Sky glow magnitude also depends upon the operating characteristics of the detector and will be greater when the spectrum of the backscattered radiation is tuned to the spectral band-pass characteristics of the detector. The human visual system is most often used to assess sky glow magnitude, but its spectral response is not limited to a single, univariate detector. Rather, the retina is composed of many neural channels, each with its own spectral and absolute sensitivities to optical radiation. Since we can use a different neural channel to see an individual star than we do to gain an overall impression of sky brightness, changes to the spectral power distribution of backscattered radiation differentially, and simultaneously, affect one’s ability to see a single star and to assess sky brightness. A general method for assessing sky glow based upon aerosol content, spectral power distribution and the specific operating characteristics of a detector, human or otherwise, is offered.
Address Lighting Research Center, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher The Society of Light and Lighting Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1065
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Weishampel, Z.A.; Cheng, W.-H.; Weishampel, J.F.
Title Sea turtle nesting patterns in Florida vis-à-vis satellite-derived measures of artificial lighting Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Remote Sensing in Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal Remote Sens Ecol Conserv
Volume 2 Issue 1 Pages 59-72
Keywords Animals; sea turtles; Artificial light; DMSP; light pollution; marine turtles; nest surveys; simultaneous autoregressive modeling; Florida; United States; Loggerhead turtle; Caretta caretta; Leatherback turtle; Dermochelys coriacea; Green turtle; Chelonia mydas
Abstract (up) Light pollution contributes to the degradation and reduction of habitat for wildlife. Nocturnally nesting and hatching sea turtle species are particularly sensitive to artificial light near nesting beaches. At local scales (0.01–0.1 km), artificial light has been experimentally shown to deter nesting females and disorient hatchlings. This study used satellite-based remote sensing to assess broad scale (~1–100s km) effects of artificial light on nesting patterns of loggerhead (Caretta caretta), leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) along the Florida coastline. Annual artificial nightlight data from 1992 to 2012 acquired by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) were compared to an extensive nesting dataset for 368, ~1 km beach segments from this same 21-year period. Relationships between nest densities and artificial lighting were derived using simultaneous autoregressive models to adjust for the presence of spatial autocorrelation. Though coastal urbanization increased in Florida during this period, nearly two-thirds of the surveyed beaches exhibited decreasing light levels (N = 249); only a small fraction of the beaches showed significant increases (N = 52). Nest densities for all three sea turtle species were negatively influenced by artificial light at neighborhood scales (<100 km); however, only loggerhead and green turtle nest densities were influenced by artificial light levels at the individual beach scale (~1 km). Satellite monitoring shows promise for light management of extensive or remote areas. As the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolutions of the satellite data are coarse, ground measurements are suggested to confirm that artificial light levels on beaches during the nesting season correspond to the annual nightlight measures.
Address Department of Biology, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 USA; John.Weishampel(at)ucf.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2056-3485 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1346
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kolláth, Z.
Title Measuring and modelling light pollution at the Zselic Starry Sky Park Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication Journal of Physics: Conference Series Abbreviated Journal J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.
Volume 218 Issue Pages 012001
Keywords Skyglow; modeling; measurement; SQM; sky brightness; Zselic; International Dark Sky Park; Hungry; measurements; modeling; light pollution; skyglow; radiative transfer
Abstract (up) One of the first 'International Dark-sky Parks' in Europe was established at the Zselic Landscape Protection Area in Hungary. A special monitoring program has been carrying on to survey the quality of the night sky using 'Sky Quality Meters' and DSLR cameras. The main conclusion of our measurements is that the local villages have only a minimal effect on the quality of the sky. There are light-domes due to the neighbouring cities only close to the horizon, the main source of obtrusive light is the city of Kaposvár. The anthropogenic component of zenith luminance of the night sky is obtained as the function of the distance from the city centre of Kaposvár. Our data were modelled by radiation transfer calculations. These results can help to draw attention to the energy emitted useless to the space and to protect our nocturnal landscape of nature parks for the next generations.
Address Konkoly Observatory, Konkoly Thege u. 15-17, H-1121 Budapest, Hungary; kollath(at)konkoly.hu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1742-6596 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1436
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zeng, C.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, S.; Yan, F.; Zhao, Q.
Title Population spatialization in China based on night-time imagery and land use data Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication International Journal of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Remote Sensing
Volume 32 Issue 24 Pages 9599-9620
Keywords DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; light at night; population; modeling
Abstract (up) Population is a key indicator of socioeconomic development, urban planning and environmental protection, particularly for developing countries like China. But, census data for any given area are neither always available nor adequately reflect the internal differences of population. The authors tried to overcome this problem by spatializing the population across China through utilizing integer night-time imagery (Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System, DMSP/OLS) and land-use data. In creating the population linear regression model, night-time light intensity and lit areas, under different types of land use, were employed as predictor variables, and census data as dependent variables. To improve model performance, eight zones were created using night-time imagery clustering and shortest path algorithm. The population model is observed to have a coefficient of determination (R 2) ranging from 0.80 to 0.95 in the research area, which remained the same in different years. A comparison of the results of this study with those of other researchers shows that the spatialized population density map, prepared on the basis of night-time imagery, reflects the population distribution character more explicitly and in greater detail.
Address State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science , Jointly Sponsored by the Institute of Remote Sensing Applications of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Beijing Normal University , Beijing, 100101, PR China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-1161 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 228
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Cinzano, P.; Falchi, F.
Title The propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume 427 Issue 4 Pages 3337-3357
Keywords radiative transfer; scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; site testing; light at night; Garstang model; LPTRAN; DMSP-OLS; GTOPO30; modeling; propagation
Abstract (up) Recent methods to map artificial night-sky brightness and stellar visibility across large territories or their distribution over the entire sky at any site are based on computation of the propagation of light pollution with Garstang models, a simplified solution of the radiative transfer problem in the atmosphere that allows fast computation by reducing it to a ray-tracing approach. They are accurate for a clear atmosphere, when a two-scattering approximation is acceptable, which is the most common situation. We present here up-to-date extended Garstang models (EGM), which provide a more general numerical solution for the radiative transfer problem applied to the propagation of light pollution in the atmosphere. We also present the LPTRAN software package, an application of EGM to high-resolution Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) satellite measurements of artificial light emission and to GTOPO30 (Global 30 Arcsecond) digital elevation data, which provides an up-to-date method to predict the artificial brightness distribution of the night sky at any site in the world at any visible wavelength for a broad range of atmospheric situations and the artificial radiation density in the atmosphere across the territory. EGM account for (i) multiple scattering, (ii) wavelengths from 250&#8201;nm to infrared, (iii) the Earth's curvature and its screening effects, (iv) site and source elevation, (v) many kinds of atmosphere with the possibility of custom set-up (e.g. including thermal inversion layers), (vi) a mix of different boundary-layer aerosols and tropospheric aerosols, with the possibility of custom set-up, (vii) up to five aerosol layers in the upper atmosphere, including fresh and aged volcanic dust and meteoric dust, (viii) variations of the scattering phase function with elevation, (ix) continuum and line gas absorption from many species, ozone included, (x) up to five cloud layers, (xi) wavelength-dependent bidirectional reflectance of the ground surface from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data, main models or custom data (snow included) and (xii) geographically variable upward light-emission function given as a three-parameter function or a Legendre polynomial series. Atmospheric scattering properties or light-pollution propagation functions from other sources can also be applied. A more general solution allows us to account also for (xiii) mountain screening, (xiv) geographical gradients of atmospheric conditions, including localized clouds and (xv) geographic distribution of ground surfaces, but suffers from too heavy computational requirements. Comparisons between predictions of classic Garstang models and EGM show close agreement for a US62 standard clear atmosphere and typical upward emission function.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 271
Permanent link to this record