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Author Portugal, S. J., White, C. R., Frappell, P. B.m Green, J. A., & Butler, P. J.
Title Impacts of “supermoon” events on the physiology of a wild bird Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue Pages 7974-7984
Keywords Animals; Moonlight
Abstract The position of the Moon in relation to the Earth and the Sun gives rise to several predictable cycles, and natural changes in nighttime light intensity are known to cause alterations to physiological processes and behaviors in many animals. The limited research undertaken to date on the physiological responses of animals to the lunar illumination has exclusively focused on the synodic lunar cycle (full moon to full moon, or moon phase) but the moon's orbit—its distance from the Earth—may also be relevant. Every month, the moon moves from apogee, its most distant point from Earth—and then to perigee, its closest point to Earth. Here, we studied wild barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) to investigate the influence of multiple interacting lunar cycles on the physiology of diurnally active animals. Our study, which uses biologging technology to continually monitor body temperature and heart rate for an entire annual cycle, asks whether there is evidence for a physiological response to natural cycles in lunar brightness in wild birds, particularly “supermoon” phenomena, where perigee coincides with a full moon. There was a three‐way interaction between lunar phase, lunar distance, and cloud cover as predictors of nighttime mean body

temperature, such that body temperature was highest on clear nights when the full

moon coincided with perigee moon. Our study is the first to report the physiological responses of wild birds to “supermoon” events; the wild geese responded to the combination of two independent lunar cycles, by significantly increasing their body temperature at night. That wild birds respond to natural fluctuations in nighttime ambient light levels support the documented responses of many species to anthropogenic sources of artificial light, that birds seem unable to override. As most biological systems are arguably organized foremost by light, this suggests that any interactions between lunar cycles and local weather conditions could have significant impacts on the energy budgets of birds.
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2628
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Author Prugh, L.R.; Golden, C.D.
Title Does moonlight increase predation risk? Meta-analysis reveals divergent responses of nocturnal mammals to lunar cycles Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication The Journal of Animal Ecology Abbreviated Journal J Anim Ecol
Volume 83 Issue 2 Pages 504-514
Keywords foraging efficiency; giving-up density; illumination; indirect effects; lunar cycles; moonlight; nocturnality; phylogenetic meta-analysis; predation risk; risk-sensitive foraging
Abstract The risk of predation strongly affects mammalian population dynamics and community interactions. Bright moonlight is widely believed to increase predation risk for nocturnal mammals by increasing the ability of predators to detect prey, but the potential for moonlight to increase detection of predators and the foraging efficiency of prey has largely been ignored. Studies have reported highly variable responses to moonlight among species, calling into question the assumption that moonlight increases risk. Here, we conducted a quantitative meta-analysis examining the effects of moonlight on the activity of 59 nocturnal mammal species to test the assumption that moonlight increases predation risk. We examined patterns of lunarphilia and lunarphobia across species in relation to factors such as trophic level, habitat cover preference and visual acuity. Across all species included in the meta-analysis, moonlight suppressed activity. The magnitude of suppression was similar to the presence of a predator in experimental studies of foraging rodents (13.6% and 18.7% suppression, respectively). Contrary to the expectation that moonlight increases predation risk for all prey species, however, moonlight effects were not clearly related to trophic level and were better explained by phylogenetic relatedness, visual acuity and habitat cover. Moonlight increased the activity of prey species that use vision as their primary sensory system and suppressed the activity of species that primarily use other senses (e.g. olfaction, echolocation), and suppression was strongest in open habitat types. Strong taxonomic patterns underlay these relationships: moonlight tended to increase primate activity, whereas it tended to suppress the activity of rodents, lagomorphs, bats and carnivores. These results indicate that visual acuity and habitat cover jointly moderate the effect of moonlight on predation risk, whereas trophic position has little effect. While the net effect of moonlight appears to increase predation risk for most nocturnal mammals, our results highlight the importance of sensory systems and phylogenetic history in determining the level of risk.
Address Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 311 Irving 1, Fairbanks, AK, 99775, USA
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ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:24102189 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 83
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Author Reddy, L.; Reddy, V.; Hemanth, S.; Prasad, P.
Title Modelling and Optimization of Solar Light Trap For “Reducing and Controlling” The Pest Population Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication International Journal of Engineering Technology, Management and Applied Sciences Abbreviated Journal Intl. J. of Engr. Tech., Man. & Appl. Sci.
Volume 3 Issue 4 Pages 224-234
Keywords Animals; insects; India; Madanapalli; Chittor; Andhra Pradesh; moonlight; polarization
Abstract Reducing and controlling the pest population using light traps is an age old practice in our crop sector. Though there are several models and designs are available but we would plan to develop something that could be solar powered trap with collecting net and not dependent on any other source like wind power, mechanical power, fuel & electricity. This device operates automatically, turning on the light during light fails i.e., 6 P.M and turns off before sunrises i.e., 6A.M. Most of the damage causing insects are active only during that time. Installing one light trap in an acre attracts at least more than 1000 adult pests for a day. The insects attract solar light trap model had been tested in our field crops like vegetables, paddy, and sugarcane, fruit crops like mango, pomegranate, guava, coconut and tea, coffee and jasmine crops across India. In this study we examine the relationship between the Lunar Phases and the efficiency of light traps in catching pests in the month of March and April at Madanapalli, Chittor, Andhra Pradesh. The lunar phase depending on the polarized moonlight and the relative catch follow the collecting distance. The collecting distance ranged and averaged in the phase angle divisions. The study demonstrated for the first time the effect of increasing polarized moonlight in the first and last quarter on the flying activity of pests. Catching quantity depend on the connection with the collecting distance when is the greatest of collection distance.
Address Department of Mechanical Engineering, SVTM (J.N.T.U.A) Angallu, Madanapalli ,Chittor (Dist), A.P., India
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1161
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Author Reinberg, A.; Smolensky, M.H.; Touitou, Y.
Title The full moon as a synchronizer of circa-monthly biological rhythms: Chronobiologic perspectives based on multidisciplinary naturalistic research Type Journal Article
Year 2016 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 33 Issue 5 Pages 465-479
Keywords Moonlight; Commentary; Animals; Plants; Human Health
Abstract Biological rhythmicity is presumed to be an advantageous genetic adaptation of fitness and survival value resulting from evolution of life forms in an environment that varies predictably-in-time during the 24 h, month, and year. The 24 h light/dark cycle is the prime synchronizer of circadian periodicities, and its modulation over the course of the year, in terms of daytime photoperiod length, is a prime synchronizer of circannual periodicities. Circadian and circannual rhythms have been the major research focus of most scientists. Circa-monthly rhythms triggered or synchronized by the 29.5 day lunar cycle of nighttime light intensity, or specifically the light of the full moon, although explored in waterborne and certain other species, have received far less study, perhaps because of associations with ancient mythology and/or an attitude naturalistic studies are of lesser merit than ones that entail molecular mechanisms. In this editorial, we cite our recent discovery through multidisciplinary naturalistic investigation of a highly integrated circadian, circa-monthly, and circannual time structure, synchronized by the natural ambient nyctohemeral, lunar, and annual light cycles, of the Peruvian apple cactus (C. peruvianus) flowering and reproductive processes that occur in close temporal coordination with like rhythms of the honey bee as its pollinator. This finding led us to explore the preservation of this integrated biological time structure, synchronized and/or triggered by environmental light cues and cycles, in the reproduction of other species, including Homo sapiens, and how the artificial light environment of today in which humans reside may be negatively affecting human reproduction efficiency.
Address a Unite de Chronobiologie , Fondation A de Rothschild , Paris cedex 19 , France
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ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:27019304 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1460
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Author Saldaña-Vázquez, R.A.; Munguía-Rosas, M.A.
Title Lunar phobia in bats and its ecological correlates: A meta-analysis Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Mammalian Biology – Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde Abbreviated Journal Mammalian Biology – Zeitschrift für Säugetierkunde
Volume 78 Issue 3 Pages 216-219
Keywords Chiroptera; Foraging activity; Foraging habitat; Latitude; Moonlight; mammals; bats; animals
Abstract Animals show several behavioral strategies to reduce predation risks. Presumably, moonlight avoidance is a strategy used by some nocturnal species to reduce the risk of predation. In bats, some research indicates that foraging activity is negatively correlated with moonlight intensity, a phenomenon better known as lunar phobia. However, the currently available evidence is contradictory because some bat species reduce their activity during nights with more moonlight while the opposite occurs in other species. We quantitatively evaluated the strength and direction of the relationship between moonlight intensity and bat activity using a meta-analysis. We also looked at some ecological correlates of lunar phobia in bats. Specifically, we examined foraging habitat and latitude as potential moderators of the size of the lunar phobia effect. Our results show that, regardless of the method used to evaluate bat activity, the overall relationship between moonlight intensity and bat activity is significant and negative (r = −0.22). Species foraging on the surface of the water (piscivores and insectivores; r = −0.83) and forest canopy species (i.e., big frugivores; r = −0.30) are more affected by moonlight than those with different foraging habitats (understory, subcanopy, open air). Latitude was positively correlated with lunar phobia (r = 0.023). The stronger lunar phobia for bats foraging on the water surface and in the forest canopy may suggest that the risk of predation is greater where moonlight penetrates more easily. The significant effect of latitude as a moderator of lunar phobia suggests that there is a weak geographic pattern, with this phobia slightly more common in tropical bats than in temperate species.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN 1616-5047 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 97
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