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Author Shi, L.; Foody, G.M.; Boyd, D.S.; Girindran, R.; Wang, L.; Du, Y.; Ling, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night-time lights are more strongly related to urban building volume than to urban area Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Letters  
  Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 29-36  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Urban; Night Lights  
  Abstract A strong relationship between night-time light (NTL) data and the areal extent of urbanized regions has been observed frequently. As urban regions have an important vertical dimension, it is hypothesized that the strength of the relationship with NTL can be increased by consideration of the volume rather than simply the area of urbanized land. Relationships between NTL and the area and volume of urbanized land were determined for a set of towns and cities in the UK, the conterminous states of the USA and countries of the European Union. Strong relationships between NTL and the area urbanized were observed, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9282 to 0.9446. Higher correlation coefficients were observed for the relationship between NTL and urban building volume, ranging from 0.9548 to 0.9604; The difference in the correlations obtained with volume and with area was statistically significant at the 95% level of confidence. Studies using NTL data may be strengthened by consideration of the volume rather than just area of urbanized land.  
  Address Key Laboratory for Environment and Disaster Monitoring and Evaluation, Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China; shilingfei14(at)mails.ucas.ac.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2150-704X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2783  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Fan, J., He, H., Hu, T., Zhang, P., Yu, X., & Zhou, Y. doi  openurl
  Title Estimation of Landscape Pattern Changes in BRICS from 1992 to 2013 Using DMSP-OLS NTL Images Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal J Ind Soc Rem Sens  
  Volume 47 Issue 5 Pages 725–735  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; BRICS; Brazil; India; China; South Africa; nighttime light; night lights; DMSP-OLS  
  Abstract Nighttime light data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System are widely used for monitoring urbanization development. Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) countries have global economic and cultural influence in the new era. It was the first time for the researches about BRICS countries adopting nighttime light data to analyze the urbanization process. In this paper, we calibrated and extracted annual urbanized area patches from cities in BRICS based on a quadratic polynomial model. Nine landscape indexes were calculated to analyze urbanization process characteristics in BRICS. The results suggested that China and India both expanded more rapidly than other countries, with urban areas that increased by more than 100%. The expansion of large core cities was dominant in the urbanization of China, while emerging and expanding small urban patches were major forces in the urbanization of India. Since 1992, urbanization declined and urban areas shrunk in Russia, but core cities still maintained strength of urbanization. Due to economic recovery, urban areas near large cities in Russia began to expand. From 1992 to 2013, the urbanization process in South Africa developed slowly, as evidenced by time series fluctuations, but overall the development remained stable. The degree of urbanization in Brazil was greater than that in South Africa but less than that in Russia. Large-sized cities expanded slowly and small-sized cities clearly expanded in BRICS from 1992 to 2013.  
  Address School of Civil and Architectural Engineering,Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, China; anjf(at)sdut.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2307  
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Author Huang, X., Wang, C., & Lu, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Understanding Spatiotemporal Development of Human Settlement in Hurricane-prone Areas on U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts using Nighttime Remote Sensing Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-22  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; hurricanes; cyclones; Weather; natural disasters; DMSP-OLS; nighttime light; night lights; vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index; VANUI  
  Abstract Hurricanes, as one of the most devastating natural disasters, have posed great threats to people in coastal areas. A better understanding of spatiotemporal dynamics of human settlement in hurricane-prone areas is demanded for sustainable development. This study uses the DMSP/OLS nighttime light (NTL) data sets from 1992 to 2013 to examine human settlement development in areas with different levels of hurricane proneness. The DMSP/OLS NTL data from six satellites were intercalibrated and desaturated with AVHRR and MODIS optical imagery to derive the vegetation-adjusted NTL urban index (VANUI), a popular index that quantifies human settlement intensity. The derived VANUI time series was examined with the Mann-Kendall test and Theil-Sen test to identify significant spatiotemporal trends. To link the VANUI product to hurricane impacts, four hurricane-prone zones were extracted to represent different levels of hurricane proneness. Aside from geographic division, a wind-speed weighted track density function was developed and applied to historical North Atlantic Basin (NAB)-origin storm tracks to better categorize the four levels of hurricane proneness. Spatiotemporal patterns of human settlement in the four zones were finally analyzed. The results clearly exhibit a north-south and inland-coastal discrepancy of human settlement dynamics. This study also reveals that both the zonal extent and zonal increase rate of human settlement positively correlate with hurricane proneness levels. The intensified human settlement in high hurricane-exposure zones deserves further attention for coastal resilience.  
  Address Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, 29208, U.S.A  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2519  
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Author Li, S.; Cheng, L.; Liu, X.; Mao, J.; Wu, J.; Li, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title City type-oriented modeling electric power consumption in China using NPP-VIIRS nighttime stable light data Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy  
  Volume 189 Issue Pages 116040  
  Keywords Energy; Remote Sensing; China; electric power consumption; Night lights; Nighttime light; VIIRS-DNB  
  Abstract Accelerating urbanization has created tremendous pressure on the global environment and energy supply, making accurate estimates of energy use of great importance. Most current models for estimating electric power consumption (EPC) from nighttime light (NTL) imagery are oversimplified, ignoring influential social and economic factors. Here we propose first classifying cities by economic focus and then separately estimating each category’s EPC using NTL data. We tested this approach using statistical employment data for 198 Chinese cities, 2015 NTL data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and annual electricity consumption statistics. We used cluster analysis of employment by sector to divide the cities into three types (industrial, service, and technology and education), then established a linear regression model for each city's NTL and EPC. Compared with the estimation results before city classification (R2: 0.785), the R2 of the separately modeled service cities and technology and education cities increased to 0.866 and 0.830, respectively. However, the results for industrial cities were less consistent due to their more complex energy consumption structure. In general, using classification before modeling helps reflect factors affecting the relationship between EPC and NTL, making the estimation process more reasonable and improving the accuracy of the results.  
  Address School of Geography and Ocean Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2672  
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Author Lu, L.; Weng, Q.; Xie, Y.; Guo, H.; Li, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An assessment of global electric power consumption using the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System nighttime light imagery Type Journal Article
  Year (down) 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy  
  Volume 189 Issue Pages 116351  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Energy; electric power consumption; Night lights  
  Abstract Industrialization and urbanization have led to a remarkable increase of electric power consumption (EPC) during the past decades. To assess the changing patterns of EPC at the global scale, this study utilized nighttime lights in conjunction with population and built-up datasets to map EPC at 1 km resolution. Firstly, the inter-calibrated nighttime light data were enhanced using the V4.0 Gridded Population Density data and the Global Human Settlement Layer. Secondly, linear models were calibrated to relate EPC to the enhanced nighttime light data; these models were then employed to estimate per-pixel EPC in 2000 and 2013. Finally, the spatiotemporal patterns of EPC between the periods were analyzed at the country, continental, and global scales. The evaluation of the EPC estimation shows a reasonable accuracy at the provincial scale with R2 of 0.8429. Over 30% of the human settlements in Asia, Europe, and North America showed apparent EPC growth. At the national scale, moderate and high EPC growth was observed in 45% of the built-up areas in East Asia. The spatial clustering patterns revealed that EPC decreased in Russia and the Western Europe. This study provides fresh insight into the spatial pattern and variations of global electric power consumption.  
  Address Key Laboratory of Digital Earth Science, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100094, PR China; qweng(at)indstate.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2701  
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