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Author Smith, M.R.; Eastman, C.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shift work: health, performance and safety problems, traditional countermeasures, and innovative management strategies to reduce circadian misalignment Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Nature and Science of Sleep Abbreviated Journal Nat Sci Sleep  
  Volume 4 Issue Pages 111-132  
  Keywords bright light; circadian rhythms; melatonin; night work; phase-shifting; sleep  
  Abstract There are three mechanisms that may contribute to the health, performance, and safety problems associated with night-shift work: (1) circadian misalignment between the internal circadian clock and activities such as work, sleep, and eating, (2) chronic, partial sleep deprivation, and (3) melatonin suppression by light at night. The typical countermeasures, such as caffeine, naps, and melatonin (for its sleep-promoting effect), along with education about sleep and circadian rhythms, are the components of most fatigue risk-management plans. We contend that these, while better than nothing, are not enough because they do not address the underlying cause of the problems, which is circadian misalignment. We explain how to reset (phase-shift) the circadian clock to partially align with the night-work, day-sleep schedule, and thus reduce circadian misalignment while preserving sleep and functioning on days off. This involves controlling light and dark using outdoor light exposure, sunglasses, sleep in the dark, and a little bright light during night work. We present a diagram of a sleep-and-light schedule to reduce circadian misalignment in permanent night work, or a rotation between evenings and nights, and give practical advice on how to implement this type of plan.  
  Address Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1179-1608 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23620685; PMCID:PMC3630978 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 149  
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Author Stevens, R.G.; Blask, D.E.; Brainard, G.C.; Hansen, J.; Lockley, S.W.; Provencio, I.; Rea, M.S.; Reinlib, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Meeting report: the role of environmental lighting and circadian disruption in cancer and other diseases Type Journal Article
  Year 2007 Publication Environmental Health Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Environ Health Perspect  
  Volume 115 Issue 9 Pages 1357-1362  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; *Circadian Rhythm; Environmental Exposure; Humans; *Lighting/adverse effects; *Neoplasms/etiology; Research; breast cancer; circadian rhythms; clock genes; lighting; melatonin; phototransduction; pineal gland  
  Abstract Light, including artificial light, has a range of effects on human physiology and behavior and can therefore alter human physiology when inappropriately timed. One example of potential light-induced disruption is the effect of light on circadian organization, including the production of several hormone rhythms. Changes in light-dark exposure (e.g., by nonday occupation or transmeridian travel) shift the timing of the circadian system such that internal rhythms can become desynchronized from both the external environment and internally with each other, impairing our ability to sleep and wake at the appropriate times and compromising physiologic and metabolic processes. Light can also have direct acute effects on neuroendocrine systems, for example, in suppressing melatonin synthesis or elevating cortisol production that may have untoward long-term consequences. For these reasons, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences convened a workshop of a diverse group of scientists to consider how best to conduct research on possible connections between lighting and health. According to the participants in the workshop, there are three broad areas of research effort that need to be addressed. First are the basic biophysical and molecular genetic mechanisms for phototransduction for circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation. Second are the possible physiologic consequences of disrupting these circadian regulatory processes such as on hormone production, particularly melatonin, and normal and neoplastic tissue growth dynamics. Third are effects of light-induced physiologic disruption on disease occurrence and prognosis, and how prevention and treatment could be improved by application of this knowledge.  
  Address Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA. bugs@uchc.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0091-6765 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:17805428; PMCID:PMC1964886 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 821  
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Author Wams, E.J.; Woelders, T.; Marring, I.; van Rosmalen, L.; Beersma, D.G.M.; Gordijn, M.C.M.; Hut, R.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Linking Light Exposure and Subsequent Sleep: A Field Polysomnography Study in Humans Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Sleep Abbreviated Journal Sleep  
  Volume 40 Issue 12 Pages  
  Keywords actigraphy; chronobiology; circadian rhythms; scoring; sleep/wake mechanisms  
  Abstract Study objectives: To determine the effect of light exposure on subsequent sleep characteristics under ambulatory field conditions. Methods: Twenty healthy participants were fitted with ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) and wrist-actigraphs to assess light exposure, rest-activity, sleep quality, timing, and architecture. Laboratory salivary dim-light melatonin onset was analyzed to determine endogenous circadian phase. Results: Later circadian clock phase was associated with lower intensity (R2 = 0.34, chi2(1) = 7.19, p < .01), later light exposure (quadratic, controlling for daylength, R2 = 0.47, chi2(3) = 32.38, p < .0001), and to later sleep timing (R2 = 0.71, chi2(1) = 20.39, p < .0001). Those with later first exposure to more than 10 lux of light had more awakenings during subsequent sleep (controlled for daylength, R2 = 0.36, chi2(2) = 8.66, p < .05). Those with later light exposure subsequently had a shorter latency to first rapid eye movement (REM) sleep episode (R2 = 0.21, chi2(1) = 5.77, p < .05). Those with less light exposure subsequently had a higher percentage of REM sleep (R2 = 0.43, chi2(2) = 13.90, p < .001) in a clock phase modulated manner. Slow-wave sleep accumulation was observed to be larger after preceding exposure to high maximal intensity and early first light exposure (p < .05). Conclusions: The quality and architecture of sleep is associated with preceding light exposure. We propose that light exposure timing and intensity do not only modulate circadian-driven aspects of sleep but also homeostatic sleep pressure. These novel ambulatory PSG findings are the first to highlight the direct relationship between light and subsequent sleep, combining knowledge of homeostatic and circadian regulation of sleep by light. Upon confirmation by interventional studies, this hypothesis could change current understanding of sleep regulation and its relationship to prior light exposure. Clinical trial details: This study was not a clinical trial. The study was ethically approved and nationally registered (NL48468.042.14).  
  Address Chronobiology Unit, Groningen Institute for Evolutionary Life Sciences, University of Groningen, The Netherlands  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0161-8105 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29040758; PMCID:PMC5806586 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1885  
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