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Author Cornean, R.E.; Margescu, M.; Simionescu, B. url  openurl
  Title Disruption of the Cyrcadian System and Obesity Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Jurnalul Pediatrului Abbreviated Journal Jurnalul Pediatrului  
  Volume (up) XVIII Issue Supplement 3 Pages 38-42  
  Keywords Human Health; sleep deprivation; circadian rhythms; *Chronobiology Disorders; chronodisruption; obesity  
  Abstract Disruption of the cyrcadian system is a relatively new concept incriminated as being responsible for obesity, cardiovascular involvement, cognitive impairment, premature aging and last but not least, cancer. Because obesity is undoubtedly assimilated today to the medical conditions related to the disruption of the normal chronobiology, this paper presents the pivotal role of chronodisruption in the neuroendocrine control of appetite among these patients.  
  Address University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Iuliu Hatieganu” Cluj – Napoca, Romania; recornean(as)yahoo.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Romanian Society of Pediatric Surgery Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2065-4855 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1349  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Andreatta, G.; Tessmar-Raible, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The still dark side of the moon: molecular mechanisms of lunar-controlled rhythms and clocks Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Journal of Molecular Biology Abbreviated Journal J Mol Biol  
  Volume (up) in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Review; Animals; Hormones; Lunar rhythms; Physiology; Proteome; Transcriptome  
  Abstract Starting with the beginning of the last century, a multitude of scientific studies has documented that the lunar cycle times behaviors and physiology in many organisms. It is plausible that even the first life forms adapted to the different rhythms controlled by the moon. Consistently, many marine species exhibit lunar rhythms, and also the number of documented “lunar-rhythmic” terrestrial species is increasing. Organisms follow diverse lunar geophysical/astronomical rhythms, which differ significantly in terms of period length: from hours (circalunidian and circatidal rhythms) to days (circasemilunar and circalunar cycles). Evidence for internal circatital and circalunar oscillators exists for a range of species based on past behavioral studies, but those species with well-documented behaviorally free-running lunar rhythms are not typically used for molecular studies. Thus, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely obscure: the dark side of the moon. Here we review findings which start to connect molecular pathways with moon-controlled physiology and behaviors. The present data indicate connections between metabolic/endocrine pathways and moon-controlled rhythms, as well as interactions between circadian and circatidal/circalunar rhythms. Moreover, recent high-throughput analyses provide useful leads towards pathways, as well as molecular markers. However, for each interpretation it is important to carefully consider the – partly substantially differing – conditions used in each experimental paradigm. In the future, it will be important to use lab experiments to delineate the specific mechanisms of the different solar- and lunar-controlled rhythms, but to also start integrating them together, as life has evolved equally long under rhythms of both sun and moon.  
  Address Max Perutz Labs, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna; Research Platform “Rhythms of Life”, University of Vienna, Vienna BioCenter, Dr. Bohr-Gasse 9/4, A-1030 Vienna. Electronic address: kristin.tessmar@mfpl.ac.at  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0022-2836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:32198116 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2865  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Smith, M.R.; Eastman, C.I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Shift work: health, performance and safety problems, traditional countermeasures, and innovative management strategies to reduce circadian misalignment Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication Nature and Science of Sleep Abbreviated Journal Nat Sci Sleep  
  Volume (up) 4 Issue Pages 111-132  
  Keywords bright light; circadian rhythms; melatonin; night work; phase-shifting; sleep  
  Abstract There are three mechanisms that may contribute to the health, performance, and safety problems associated with night-shift work: (1) circadian misalignment between the internal circadian clock and activities such as work, sleep, and eating, (2) chronic, partial sleep deprivation, and (3) melatonin suppression by light at night. The typical countermeasures, such as caffeine, naps, and melatonin (for its sleep-promoting effect), along with education about sleep and circadian rhythms, are the components of most fatigue risk-management plans. We contend that these, while better than nothing, are not enough because they do not address the underlying cause of the problems, which is circadian misalignment. We explain how to reset (phase-shift) the circadian clock to partially align with the night-work, day-sleep schedule, and thus reduce circadian misalignment while preserving sleep and functioning on days off. This involves controlling light and dark using outdoor light exposure, sunglasses, sleep in the dark, and a little bright light during night work. We present a diagram of a sleep-and-light schedule to reduce circadian misalignment in permanent night work, or a rotation between evenings and nights, and give practical advice on how to implement this type of plan.  
  Address Biological Rhythms Research Laboratory, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1179-1608 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:23620685; PMCID:PMC3630978 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 149  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Reiter, R.J.; Tan, D.X.; Korkmaz, A.; Rosales-Corral, S.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Melatonin and stable circadian rhythms optimize maternal, placental and fetal physiology Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Human Reproduction Update Abbreviated Journal Hum Reprod Update  
  Volume (up) 20 Issue 2 Pages 293-307  
  Keywords Human Health; Animals; Antioxidants/physiology; Biological Clocks/physiology; Circadian Rhythm/*physiology; Female; Fetus/*physiology; Humans; Mammals; Melatonin/biosynthesis/*physiology; Mice; Oxidative Stress/physiology; Parturition/physiology; Placenta/metabolism/*physiology; Pre-Eclampsia/etiology/metabolism; Pregnancy; Uterus/metabolism; circadian rhythms; fetus; melatonin; placenta; pre-eclampsia  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: Research within the last decade has shown melatonin to have previously-unsuspected beneficial actions on the peripheral reproductive organs. Likewise, numerous investigations have documented that stable circadian rhythms are also helpful in maintaining reproductive health. The relationship of melatonin and circadian rhythmicity to maternal and fetal health is summarized in this review. METHODS: Databases were searched for the related published English literature up to 15 May 2013. The search terms used in various combinations included melatonin, circadian rhythms, biological clock, suprachiasmatic nucleus, ovary, pregnancy, uterus, placenta, fetus, pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, ischemia-reperfusion, chronodisruption, antioxidants, oxidative stress and free radicals. The results of the studies uncovered are summarized herein. RESULTS: Both melatonin and circadian rhythms impact reproduction, especially during pregnancy. Melatonin is a multifaceted molecule with direct free radical scavenging and indirect antioxidant activities. Melatonin is produced in both the ovary and in the placenta where it protects against molecular mutilation and cellular dysfunction arising from oxidative/nitrosative stress. The placenta, in particular, is often a site of excessive free radical generation due to less than optimal adhesion to the uterine wall, which leads to either persistent hypoxia or intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation, processes that cause massive free radical generation and organ dysfunction. This may contribute to pre-eclampsia and other disorders which often complicate pregnancy. Melatonin has ameliorated free radical damage to the placenta and to the fetus in experiments using non-human mammals. Likewise, the maintenance of a regular maternal light/dark and sleep/wake cycle is important to stabilize circadian rhythms generated by the maternal central circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Optimal circadian rhythmicity in the mother is important since her circadian clock, either directly or indirectly via the melatonin rhythm, programs the developing master oscillator of the fetus. Experimental studies have shown that disturbed maternal circadian rhythms, referred to as chronodisruption, and perturbed melatonin cycles have negative consequences for the maturing fetal oscillators, which may lead to psychological and behavioral problems in the newborn. To optimize regular circadian rhythms and prevent disturbances of the melatonin cycle during pregnancy, shift work and bright light exposure at night should be avoided, especially during the last trimester of pregnancy. Finally, melatonin synergizes with oxytocin to promote delivery of the fetus. Since blood melatonin levels are normally highest during the dark period, the propensity of childbirth to occur at night may relate to the high levels of melatonin at this time which work in concert with oxytocin to enhance the strength of uterine contractions. CONCLUSIONS: A number of conclusions naturally evolve from the data summarized in this review: (i) melatonin, of both pineal and placental origin, has essential functions in fetal maturation and placenta/uterine homeostasis; (ii) circadian clock genes, which are components of all cells including those in the peripheral reproductive organs, have important roles in reproductive and organismal (fetal and maternal) physiology; (iii) due to the potent antioxidant actions of melatonin, coupled with its virtual absence of toxicity, this indoleamine may have utility in the treatment of pre-eclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, placental and fetal ischemia/reperfusion, etc. (iv) the propensity for parturition to occur at night may relate to the synergism between the nocturnal increase in melatonin and oxytocin.  
  Address Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1355-4786 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:24132226 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 504  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Qian, J.; Scheer, F.A.J.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Circadian System and Glucose Metabolism: Implications for Physiology and Disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: TEM Abbreviated Journal Trends Endocrinol Metab  
  Volume (up) 27 Issue 5 Pages 282-293  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian rhythms; food timing; glucose metabolism; melatonin; sleep; type 2 diabetes  
  Abstract The circadian system serves one of the most fundamental properties present in nearly all organisms: it generates 24-h rhythms in behavioral and physiological processes and enables anticipating and adapting to daily environmental changes. Recent studies indicate that the circadian system is important in regulating the daily rhythm in glucose metabolism. Disturbance of this circadian control or of its coordination relative to the environmental/behavioral cycle, such as in shift work, eating late, or due to genetic changes, results in disturbed glucose control and increased type 2 diabetes risk. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying glucose regulation by the circadian system and its disturbance may help in the development of therapeutic interventions against the deleterious health consequences of circadian disruption.  
  Address Medical Chronobiology Program, Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; fscheer(at)bwh.harvard.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Cell Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1043-2760 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27079518; PMCID:PMC4842150 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1446  
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