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Author Abd Mutalib, A.H.; Fadzly, N.; Ahmad, A.; Nasir, N.
Title Understanding nesting ecology and behaviour of green marine turtles at Setiu, Terengganu, Malaysia Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Marine Ecology Abbreviated Journal Mar Ecol
Volume 36 Issue 4 Pages 1003-1012
Keywords Chelonia mydas; conservation; green turtles; nesting behaviour; nesting ecology; sea turtles; reptiles; marine reptiles; verterbrates; ecology; Sea turtle conservation; Setiu; Malaysia
Abstract In this paper, we emphasize the importance of understanding the nesting ecology and nesting behaviour of green marine turtles (Chelonia mydas). Data were collected from 2007 until 2012 from nesting beaches at Setiu Terengganu, Malaysia. We focused on one of the beaches, Telaga Papan, based on data collected in 2012. We recorded the distribution of nesting areas, the emergence hour and the correlation between successful nesting attempts and false crawls. Telaga Papan had a significantly higher distribution of green marine turtle nesting compared with the other five beaches (ANOVA, F5,42 = 8.874, P < 0.01, mean = 36.750 ± 3.727). The highest number of successful nesting attempts was recorded in 2012 (mean = 28.714). A majority of the species landed between 22:00 and 23:59 h (25%). There was a strong correlation between successful nesting attempts and false crawls (rs = 0.883, P = 0.02). Based on these findings on the nesting ecology and nesting behaviour of green marine turtles, we suggest that scientific research, strict monitoring, awareness programs and policy implementation should be carried out proactively. Such activities are necessary to reduce the anthropogenic pressures at the nesting beaches as well as to ensure more successful nesting attempts of green marine turtles in Setiu.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 369
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Author Constant, N.
Title Geospatial assessment of artificial lighting impacts on sea turtles in Tortuguero, Costa Rica Type Manuscript
Year 2015 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; sea turtles; light pollution; GIS; Tortuguero; Costa Rica
Abstract Between June and August 2014, I conducted walking surveys to map the nesting beach

and light sources using a Trimble Juno SB GPS unit, and I developed a GIS database that formed the basis for subsequent analyses and data visualization. I built STC’s monitoring data from 2004 through 2014 into a polygon layer of the beach subdivided into mile sections defined by mile markers erected by STC. During the new moon in June and July 2014, I conducted brightness surveys in concert with STC’s light surveys and measured brightness in units of luminance at 50-meter intervals along the beach using a Unihedron Sky Quality Meter. Using spatial data of the beach and light sources, luminance data from brightness assessments, and monitoring data from STC, I determined a mean luminance value for each mile section, examined the relationship between luminance and nesting activity, and mapped light pollution on the beach.

I found that mean luminance and the total number of green turtle emergences per mile section were significantly negatively correlated. Mean luminance exceeded the minimum threshold for light pollution in 6 of the 43 mile sections, and there were significantly fewer emergences in mile sections experiencing light pollution. Mean luminance was highest in mile sections adjacent to Tortuguero Village, where sources of artificial light were concentrated. These findings were consistent with STC’s light survey data, and mean light count and the total number of green turtle emergences per mile section from 2004 to 2014 were also significantly negatively correlated. Cumulatively, these results suggest that artificial lighting from adjacent development impacts green turtle utilization of nesting habitat and changes the spatial distribution of green turtle nesting activity on Tortuguero Beach.

These results were consistent with the findings of previous studies conducted on sea turtle nesting beaches and support the need for a turtle-friendly lighting initiative in Tortuguero.
Address Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, 450 Research Dr, Durham, NC 27708 USA
Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis
Publisher Duke University Place of Publication Durham, NC Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1247
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Author Lorne, J.; Salmon, M.
Title Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean Type Journal Article
Year 2007 Publication Endangered Species Research Abbreviated Journal Endang. Species Res.
Volume 3 Issue Pages 23-30
Keywords Sea-finding · Orientation; Migration; Sea turtle; Loggerhead turtle; Caretta caretta; Photopollution; animals; turtles; marine turtles; reptiles
Abstract Artificial lighting disrupts sea turtle hatchling orientation from the nest to the sea. We studied how a light-induced landward crawl affects the later ability of hatchlings to crawl to the sea, and to swim away from the shore from a dark beach. A brief (2 min) landward crawl had no effect on swimming orientation as long as surface waves were present. In a calm sea, landward-crawling hatchlings failed to swim offshore, while those crawling seaward were well oriented. A long (2 h) crawl toward a landward light source, however, impaired the ability of hatchlings to crawl seaward. These results demonstrate that orientation toward artificial light sources compromises the ability of hatchlings to respond to natural orientation cues, both on land and in the sea. Based on these results, we suggest several changes to current management practices used when releasing misoriented turtles in the wild.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
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ISSN 1863-5407 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 77
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Author Mazor, T.; Levin, N.; Possingham, H.P.; Levy, Y.; Rocchini, D.; Richardson, A.J.; Kark, S.
Title Can satellite-based night lights be used for conservation? The case of nesting sea turtles in the Mediterranean Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal Biological Conservation
Volume 159 Issue Pages 63-72
Keywords Artificial night lights; Caretta caretta; Chelonia mydas; Coastal conservation; Satellite imagery; Sea turtle conservation
Abstract Artificial night lights pose a major threat to multiple species. However, this threat is often disregarded in conservation management and action because it is difficult to quantify its effect. Increasing availability of high spatial-resolution satellite images may enable us to better incorporate this threat into future work, particularly in highly modified ecosystems such as the coastal zone. In this study we examine the potential of satellite night light imagery to predict the distribution of the endangered loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtle nests in the eastern Mediterranean coastline. Using remote sensing tools and high resolution data derived from the SAC-C satellite and the International Space Station, we examined the relationship between the long term spatial patterns of sea turtle nests and the intensity of night lights along Israel’s entire Mediterranean coastline. We found that sea turtles nests are negatively related to night light intensity and are concentrated in darker sections along the coast. Our resulting GLMs showed that night lights were a significant factor for explaining the distribution of sea turtle nests. Other significant variables included: cliff presence, human population density and infrastructure. This study is one of the first to show that night lights estimated with satellite-based imagery can be used to help explain sea turtle nesting activity at a detailed resolution over large areas. This approach can facilitate the management of species affected by night lights, and will be particularly useful in areas that are inaccessible or where broad-scale prioritization of conservation action is required.
Address ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions, School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 213
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Author Pendoley, K.; Kamrowski, R.
Title Influence of horizon elevation on the sea-finding behaviour of hatchling flatback turtles exposed to artificial light glow Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Marine Ecology Progress Series Abbreviated Journal Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser.
Volume 529 Issue Pages 279-288
Keywords Animals; Hatchling orientation; Artificial lighting; Horizon elevation; Marine turtle; Conservation management; Elevation; Industry; Coastal development; Sea turtle; Sea turtle conservation
Abstract Marine turtles are threatened globally by increasing coastal development. In particular, increased artificial lighting at the nesting beach has the potential to disrupt turtle breeding success. Few published data exist regarding the behaviour of the flatback turtle Natator depressus, a species endemic to Australia, in response to artificial light. Given the ongoing industrialisation of the Australian coastline, this study is a timely investigation into the orientation of flatback hatchlings exposed to light glow produced by lighting typically used in industrial settings. We recorded the orientation of hatchlings at the nesting beach on Barrow Island, Western Australia, exposed to 3 types of standard lighting — high-pressure sodium vapour (HPS), metal halide (MH), and fluorescent white (FW)—at 3 different intensities. The light array was positioned either behind a high dune (producing a high, dark silhouette; 16° elevation), or in a low creek bed (producing a low silhouette and bright horizon; 2° elevation). At medium and high light intensities of all 3 light types, hatchlings were significantly less ocean-oriented when exposed to light at 2° elevation compared to 16° elevation. This difference remained with glow from low-intensity MH light; however, there was no significant difference in orientation of hatchlings exposed to low- intensity HPS and FW light glow at either elevation. Our study emphasises the importance of horizon elevation cues in hatchling sea-finding. Since all species of marine turtles show similar sea-finding behaviour, our results have important implications for management of lighting adjacent to turtle nesting beaches in Australia and elsewhere, as coastal development continues.
Address Pendoley Environmental Pty Ltd, 12A Pitt Way, Booragoon, Western Australia 6154, Australia; ruth.kamrowski@penv.com.au
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1189
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