toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author Grauer, A.D.; Grauer, P.A.; Davies, N.; Davies, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of Space Weather on the Natural Night Sky Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal PASP  
  Volume 131 Issue 1005 Pages 114508  
  Keywords Darkness; night sky brightness; United States; New Zealand; Sun; space weather; solar wind  
  Abstract In 2018, Solar Cycle 24 entered a deep solar minimum. During this period, we collected night sky brightness data at Cosmic Campground International Dark Sky Sanctuary (CCIDSS) in the USA (2018 September 4–2019 January 4) and at Aotea/Great Barrier Island International Dark Sky Sanctuary (AGBIIDSS) in New Zealand (2018 March 26–August 31. These sites have artificial-light-pollution-free natural night skies. The equipment employed are identical Unihedron SQM-LU-DL meters, used as single-channel differential photometers, to scan the sky as Earth rotates on its axis. We have developed new analysis techniques which select those data points which are uninfluenced by Sun, Moon, or clouds to follow brightness changes at selected points on the celestial sphere and to measure the brightness of the airglow above its quiescent level. The 2018 natural night sky was measured to change in brightness by approximately 0.9 mag arcsec−2 at both locations. Preliminary results indicate the modulations of the light curves (brightness versus R.A.) we observed are related in complex ways to elements of space weather conditions in the near-Earth environment. In particular, episodes of increased night sky brightness are observed to be contemporaneous with geomagnetic activity, increases in mean solar wind speed, and some solar proton/electron fluence events. Charged particles in the solar wind take days to reach near-Earth environment after a coronal hole is observed to be facing in our direction. Use of this information could make it possible to predict increases in Earth’s natural night sky brightness several days in advance. What we have learned during this solar minimum leads us to search for other solar driven changes in night sky brightness as the Sun begins to move into solar maximum conditions.  
  Address Catalina Sky Survey, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, USA; algrauer(at)me.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Astronomical Society of the Pacific Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2696  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jechow, A.; Holker, F.; Kyba, C.C.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Using all-sky differential photometry to investigate how nocturnal clouds darken the night sky in rural areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1391  
  Keywords Skyglow; differential photometry; clouds; sky brightness  
  Abstract Artificial light at night has affected most of the natural nocturnal landscapes worldwide and the subsequent light pollution has diverse effects on flora, fauna and human well-being. To evaluate the environmental impacts of light pollution, it is crucial to understand both the natural and artificial components of light at night under all weather conditions. The night sky brightness for clear skies is relatively well understood and a reference point for a lower limit is defined. However, no such reference point exists for cloudy skies. While some studies have examined the brightening of the night sky by clouds in urban areas, the published data on the (natural) darkening by clouds is very sparse. Knowledge of reference points for the illumination of natural nocturnal environments however, is essential for experimental design and ecological modeling to assess the impacts of light pollution. Here we use differential all-sky photometry with a commercial digital camera to investigate how clouds darken sky brightness at two rural sites. The spatially resolved data enables us to identify and study the nearly unpolluted parts of the sky and to set an upper limit on ground illumination for overcast nights at sites without light pollution.  
  Address GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Remote Sensing, Telegrafenberg, 14473, Potsdam, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30718668; PMCID:PMC6361923 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2188  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kolláth, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring and modelling light pollution at the Zselic Starry Sky Park Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Physics: Conference Series Abbreviated Journal J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.  
  Volume 218 Issue Pages 012001  
  Keywords Skyglow; modeling; measurement; SQM; sky brightness; Zselic; International Dark Sky Park; Hungry; measurements; modeling; light pollution; skyglow; radiative transfer  
  Abstract One of the first 'International Dark-sky Parks' in Europe was established at the Zselic Landscape Protection Area in Hungary. A special monitoring program has been carrying on to survey the quality of the night sky using 'Sky Quality Meters' and DSLR cameras. The main conclusion of our measurements is that the local villages have only a minimal effect on the quality of the sky. There are light-domes due to the neighbouring cities only close to the horizon, the main source of obtrusive light is the city of Kaposvár. The anthropogenic component of zenith luminance of the night sky is obtained as the function of the distance from the city centre of Kaposvár. Our data were modelled by radiation transfer calculations. These results can help to draw attention to the energy emitted useless to the space and to protect our nocturnal landscape of nature parks for the next generations.  
  Address Konkoly Observatory, Konkoly Thege u. 15-17, H-1121 Budapest, Hungary; kollath(at)konkoly.hu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1742-6596 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1436  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kyba, C.C.M.; Tong, K.P.; Bennie, J.; Birriel, I.; Birriel, J.J.; Cool, A.; Danielsen, A.; Davies, T.W.; Outer, P.N. den; Edwards, W.; Ehlert, R.; Falchi, F.; Fischer, J.; Giacomelli, A.; Giubbilini, F.; Haaima, M.; Hesse, C.; Heygster, G.; Hölker, F.; Inger, R.; Jensen, L.J.; Kuechly, H.U.; Kuehn, J.; Langill, P.; Lolkema, D.E.; Nagy, M.; Nievas, M.; Ochi, N.; Popow, E.; Posch, T.; Puschnig, J.; Ruhtz, T.; Schmidt, W.; Schwarz, R.; Schwope, A.; Spoelstra, H.; Tekatch, A.; Trueblood, M.; Walker, C.E.; Weber, M.; Welch, D.L.; Zamorano, J.; Gaston, K.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Worldwide variations in artificial skyglow Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci. Rep.  
  Volume 5 Issue Pages 8409  
  Keywords Skyglow; light pollution; measurements; remote sensing; sky brightness; calibration  
  Abstract Despite constituting a widespread and significant environmental change, understanding of artificial nighttime skyglow is extremely limited. Until now, published monitoring studies have been local or regional in scope, and typically of short duration. In this first major international compilation of monitoring data we answer several key questions about skyglow properties. Skyglow is observed to vary over four orders of magnitude, a range hundreds of times larger than was the case before artificial light. Nearly all of the study sites were polluted by artificial light. A non-linear relationship is observed between the sky brightness on clear and overcast nights, with a change in behavior near the rural to urban landuse transition. Overcast skies ranged from a third darker to almost 18 times brighter than clear. Clear sky radiances estimated by the World Atlas of Artificial Night Sky Brightness were found to be overestimated by ~25%; our dataset will play an important role in the calibration and ground truthing of future skyglow models. Most of the brightly lit sites darkened as the night progressed, typically by ~5% per hour. The great variation in skyglow radiance observed from site-to-site and with changing meteorological conditions underlines the need for a long-term international monitoring program.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute for Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries, Berlin, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1103  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Leinert, C.; Bowyer, S.; Haikala, L.K.; Hanner, M.S.; Hauser, M.G.; Levasseur-Regourd, A.-C.; Mann, I.; Mattila, K.; Reach, W.T.; Schlosser, W.; Staude, H.J.; Toller, G.N.; Weiland, J.L.; Weinberg, J.L.; Witt, A.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The 1997 reference of diffuse night sky brightness Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series Abbreviated Journal Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. Ser.  
  Volume 127 Issue 1 Pages 1-99  
  Keywords Skyglow; darkness; Sky brightness  
  Abstract In the following we present material in tabular and graphical form, with the aim to allow the non-specialist to obtain a realistic estimate of the diffuse night sky brightness over a wide range of wavelengths from the far UV longward of Lyalpha to the far-infrared. At the same time the data are to provide a reference for cases in which background brightness has to be discussed, including the planning for space observations and the issue of protection of observatory sites. We try to give a critical presentation of the status at the beginning of 1997. Prepared by members of Commission 21 ``Light of the night sky'' of the IAU, including most of the recent (vice-)presidents.  
  Address Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg, Germany  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher EDP Sciences Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0365-0138 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1132  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: