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Author Grauer, A.D.; Grauer, P.A.; Davies, N.; Davies, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of Space Weather on the Natural Night Sky Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal PASP  
  Volume 131 Issue 1005 Pages (down) 114508  
  Keywords Darkness; night sky brightness; United States; New Zealand; Sun; space weather; solar wind  
  Abstract In 2018, Solar Cycle 24 entered a deep solar minimum. During this period, we collected night sky brightness data at Cosmic Campground International Dark Sky Sanctuary (CCIDSS) in the USA (2018 September 4–2019 January 4) and at Aotea/Great Barrier Island International Dark Sky Sanctuary (AGBIIDSS) in New Zealand (2018 March 26–August 31. These sites have artificial-light-pollution-free natural night skies. The equipment employed are identical Unihedron SQM-LU-DL meters, used as single-channel differential photometers, to scan the sky as Earth rotates on its axis. We have developed new analysis techniques which select those data points which are uninfluenced by Sun, Moon, or clouds to follow brightness changes at selected points on the celestial sphere and to measure the brightness of the airglow above its quiescent level. The 2018 natural night sky was measured to change in brightness by approximately 0.9 mag arcsec−2 at both locations. Preliminary results indicate the modulations of the light curves (brightness versus R.A.) we observed are related in complex ways to elements of space weather conditions in the near-Earth environment. In particular, episodes of increased night sky brightness are observed to be contemporaneous with geomagnetic activity, increases in mean solar wind speed, and some solar proton/electron fluence events. Charged particles in the solar wind take days to reach near-Earth environment after a coronal hole is observed to be facing in our direction. Use of this information could make it possible to predict increases in Earth’s natural night sky brightness several days in advance. What we have learned during this solar minimum leads us to search for other solar driven changes in night sky brightness as the Sun begins to move into solar maximum conditions.  
  Address Catalina Sky Survey, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, USA; algrauer(at)me.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Astronomical Society of the Pacific Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0004-6280 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2696  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Liu, M.; Li, W.; Zhang, B.; Hao, Q.; Xiaowei, G.; Yuchuan, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Research on the Influence of Weather Conditions on Urban Night Light Environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society  
  Volume 54 Issue Pages (down) 101980  
  Keywords Skyglow; Weather; sky brightness; Urban  
  Abstract The increasingly serious urban light pollution has deepened the relevant research, and weather conditions indeed have great impact on the urban night light environment. Based on the SQM instrument, fish-eye camera and weather-related systems, this paper analyzes the changing law of night sky with time and weather. The brightness of the typical clear night sky changes regularly with time, and mainly includes five phases: rapid decline phase, slow decline phase, unstable decline phase, smooth phase, and rapid increase phase of sky brightness. In two phases of the smooth sky brightness, the average sky brightness in the high and low brightness phase respectively is 18.123 mag/arcsecond2 and 18.82 mag/arcsecond2, and about 15 times and 8 times higher than those of the natural night sky. This paper establishes the regression model of typical clear night sky brightness in rapid decline phase and rapid increase phase of sky brightness. The sky magnitude brightness in rainy weather is much lower than that in clear weather, the difference is about 3 mag/arcsecond2, the brightness can be reach 15.63 mag / arcsecond2; the average magnitude brightness in snowy days is about 0.17 mag/arcsecond2 higher than that in cloudy weather. There is a significant correlation among the air quality index, the ground illumination ratio of moon, the atmospheric visibility and the sky brightness. The deepened air pollution can also intensify light pollution, which can increase to 3 and 10 times higher than the night sky brightness under the moderate and severe air pollution. The lunar cycle has the least impact on light pollution in clear days, the sky brightness with the full moon is about 2 and 3 times higher than that without the moon.  
  Address Corresponding author at: No.2, Ling Gong Road, Gan Jing Zi District, School of Architecture and Fine Art, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liao Ning Province 116024, China; iumingyitj(at)163.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2759  
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Author Spitschan, M.; Aguirre, G.K.; Brainard, D.H.; Sweeney, A.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Variation of outdoor illumination as a function of solar elevation and light pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 6 Issue Pages (down) 26756  
  Keywords Skyglow; Measurements; light pollution; daylight; twilight; sky brightness; spectral irradiance; CIE  
  Abstract The illumination of the environment undergoes both intensity and spectral changes during the 24 h cycle of a day. Daylight spectral power distributions are well described by low-dimensional models such as the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) daylight model, but the performance of this model in non-daylight regimes is not characterised. We measured downwelling spectral irradiance across multiple days in two locations in North America: One rural location (Cherry Springs State Park, PA) with minimal anthropogenic light sources, and one city location (Philadelphia, PA). We characterise the spectral, intensity and colour changes and extend the existing CIE model for daylight to capture twilight components and the spectrum of the night sky.  
  Address Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27272736 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1464  
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Author Kolláth, Z. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Measuring and modelling light pollution at the Zselic Starry Sky Park Type Journal Article
  Year 2010 Publication Journal of Physics: Conference Series Abbreviated Journal J. Phys.: Conf. Ser.  
  Volume 218 Issue Pages (down) 012001  
  Keywords Skyglow; modeling; measurement; SQM; sky brightness; Zselic; International Dark Sky Park; Hungry; measurements; modeling; light pollution; skyglow; radiative transfer  
  Abstract One of the first 'International Dark-sky Parks' in Europe was established at the Zselic Landscape Protection Area in Hungary. A special monitoring program has been carrying on to survey the quality of the night sky using 'Sky Quality Meters' and DSLR cameras. The main conclusion of our measurements is that the local villages have only a minimal effect on the quality of the sky. There are light-domes due to the neighbouring cities only close to the horizon, the main source of obtrusive light is the city of Kaposvár. The anthropogenic component of zenith luminance of the night sky is obtained as the function of the distance from the city centre of Kaposvár. Our data were modelled by radiation transfer calculations. These results can help to draw attention to the energy emitted useless to the space and to protect our nocturnal landscape of nature parks for the next generations.  
  Address Konkoly Observatory, Konkoly Thege u. 15-17, H-1121 Budapest, Hungary; kollath(at)konkoly.hu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher IOP Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1742-6596 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1436  
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Author den Outer, P.; Lolkema, D.; Haaima, M.; van der Hoff, R.; Spoelstra, H.; Schmidt, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Intercomparisons of nine sky brightness detectors Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)  
  Volume 11 Issue 10 Pages (down) 9603-9612  
  Keywords Calibration; Darkness; *Extraterrestrial Environment; Humans; Light; Luminescent Measurements; Netherlands; *Optical Phenomena; Optics and Photonics/*instrumentation/*methods; Sky Quality Meter; artificial lighting; intercalibration; intercomparison; light pollution; night sky brightness  
  Abstract Nine Sky Quality Meters (SQMs) have been intercompared during a night time measurement campaign held in the Netherlands in April 2011. Since then the nine SQMs have been distributed across The Netherlands and form the Dutch network for monitoring night sky brightness. The goal of the intercomparison was to infer mutual calibration factors and obtain insight into the variability of the SQMs under different meteorological situations. An ensemble average is built from the individual measurements and used as a reference to infer the mutual calibration factors. Data required additional synchronization prior to the calibration determination, because the effect of moving clouds combined with small misalignments emerges as time jitter in the measurements. Initial scatter of the individual instruments lies between +/-14%. Individual night time sums range from -16% to +20%. Intercalibration reduces this to 0.5%, and -7% to +9%, respectively. During the campaign the smallest luminance measured was 0.657 +/- 0.003 mcd/m(2) on 12 April, and the largest value was 5.94 +/- 0.03 mcd/m(2) on 2 April. During both occurrences interfering circumstances like snow cover or moonlight were absent.  
  Address National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, A. van Leeuwenhoeklaan 9, 3720 BA Bilthoven, The Netherlands. peter.den.outer@rivm.nl  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22163715; PMCID:PMC3231263 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 196  
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