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Author Arnaud Da Silva, Jelmer M. Samplonius, Emmi Schlicht, Mihai Valcu, Bart Kempenaers
Title Artificial night lighting rather than traffic noise affects the daily timing of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Behavioral Ecology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 25 Issue 5 Pages 1037-1047
Keywords animal, birds, dawn chorus, dusk chorus, light intensity, light pollution, noise pollution, seasonality, songbird, weather
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1105
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Author Cochran, W.W.; Mouritsen, H.; Wikelski, M.
Title Migrating songbirds recalibrate their magnetic compass daily from twilight cues Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal Science
Volume 304 Issue 5669 Pages 405-408
Keywords *Animal Migration; Animals; Biological Clocks; Calibration; Cues; *Flight, Animal; Geography; *Magnetics; *Orientation; *Solar System; Songbirds/*physiology
Abstract Night migratory songbirds can use stars, sun, geomagnetic field, and polarized light for orientation when tested in captivity. We studied the interaction of magnetic, stellar, and twilight orientation cues in free-flying songbirds. We exposed Catharus thrushes to eastward-turned magnetic fields during the twilight period before takeoff and then followed them for up to 1100 kilometers. Instead of heading north, experimental birds flew westward. On subsequent nights, the same individuals migrated northward again. We suggest that birds orient with a magnetic compass calibrated daily from twilight cues. This could explain how birds cross the magnetic equator and deal with declination.
Address Illinois Natural History Survey, 607 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL61820, USA. Sparrow@springnet1.com
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ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:15087541 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 57
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Author Da Silva, A.; Valcu, M.; Kempenaers, B.
Title Light pollution alters the phenology of dawn and dusk singing in common European songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 2015 Issue Pages 20140126
Keywords Animals; birds; artificial light at night; seasonality; song production; dawn chorus; dusk chorus; weather; European robin; Erithacus rubecula; common blackbird; song thrush; Turdus philomelos; great tit; Parus major; blue tit; common chaffinch; Fringilla coelebs
Abstract Artificial night lighting is expanding globally, but its ecological consequences remain little understood. Animals often use changes in day length as a cue to time seasonal behaviour. Artificial night lighting may influence the perception of day length, and may thus affect both circadian and circannual rhythms. Over a 3.5 month period, from winter to breeding, we recorded daily singing activity of six common songbird species in 12 woodland sites, half of which were affected by street lighting. We previously reported on analyses suggesting that artificial night lighting affects the daily timing of singing in five species. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of artificial night lighting is also associated with the seasonal occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. We found that in four species dawn and dusk singing developed earlier in the year at sites exposed to light pollution. We also examined the effects of weather conditions and found that rain and low temperatures negatively affected the occurrence of dawn and dusk singing. Our results support the hypothesis that artificial night lighting alters natural seasonal rhythms, independently of other effects of urbanization. The fitness consequences of the observed changes in seasonal timing of behaviour remain unknown.
Address Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Eberhard-Gwinner-Strasse, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany; b.kempenaers@orn.mpg.de
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Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
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Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1124
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Author Da Silva, Arnaud; de Jong, Maaike; van Grunsven, Roy; H A Visser, Marcel; E Kempenaers, Bart; Spoelstra, Kamiel
Title Experimental illumination of a forest: no effects of lights of different colours on the onset of the dawn chorus in songbirds Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 4 Issue 1 Pages 160638
Keywords animals; birds; dawn song; light spectra; light intensity
Abstract Light pollution is increasing exponentially, but its impact on animal behaviour is still poorly understood. For songbirds, the most repeatable finding is that artificial night lighting leads to an earlier daily onset of dawn singing. Most of these studies are, however, correlational and cannot entirely dissociate effects of light pollution from other effects of urbanization. In addition, there are no studies in which the effects of different light colours on singing have been tested. Here, we investigated whether the timing of dawn singing in wild songbirds is influenced by artificial light using an experimental set-up with conventional street lights. We illuminated eight previously dark forest edges with white, green, red or no light, and recorded daily onset of dawn singing during the breeding season. Based on earlier work, we predicted that onset of singing would be earlier in the lighted treatments, with the strongest effects in the early-singing species. However, we found no significant effect of the experimental night lighting (of any colour) in the 14 species for which we obtained sufficient data. Confounding effects of urbanization in previous studies may explain these results, but we also suggest that the experimental night lighting may not have been strong enough to have an effect on singing.
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Call Number LoNNe @ schroer @ Serial 1619
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Author Dominoni, D.; Quetting, M.; Partecke, J.
Title Artificial light at night advances avian reproductive physiology Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 280 Issue 1756 Pages 20123017
Keywords Animals; *Lighting; Male; Molting; Photoperiod; Reproduction/*physiology; Singing; Songbirds/*physiology; Testis/anatomy & histology; Testosterone/blood; Trees
Abstract Artificial light at night is a rapidly increasing phenomenon and it is presumed to have global implications. Light at night has been associated with health problems in humans as a consequence of altered biological rhythms. Effects on wild animals have been less investigated, but light at night has often been assumed to affect seasonal cycles of urban dwellers. Using light loggers attached to free-living European blackbirds (Turdus merula), we first measured light intensity at night which forest and city birds are subjected to in the wild. Then we used these measurements to test for the effect of light at night on timing of reproductive physiology. Captive city and forest blackbirds were exposed to either dark nights or very low light intensities at night (0.3 lux). Birds exposed to light at night developed their reproductive system up to one month earlier, and also moulted earlier, than birds kept under dark nights. Furthermore, city birds responded differently than forest individuals to the light at night treatment, suggesting that urbanization can alter the physiological phenotype of songbirds. Our results emphasize the impact of human-induced lighting on the ecology of millions of animals living in cities and call for an understanding of the fitness consequences of light pollution.
Address Department of Migration and Immuno-ecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, Radolfzell 78315, Germany. ddominoni@orn.mpg.de
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ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
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Notes PMID:23407836; PMCID:PMC3574380 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 50
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