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Author (up) Johansson, M.; Pedersen, E.; Maleetipwan-Mattsson, P.; Kuhn, L.; Laike, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Perceived outdoor lighting quality (POLQ): A lighting assessment tool Type Journal Article
  Year 2013 Publication Journal of Environmental Psychology Abbreviated Journal Journal of Environmental Psychology  
  Volume 39 Issue Pages 14-21  
  Keywords Perception; Street lighting; Observation-based environmental assessment; Urban space  
  Abstract A shift towards more energy-efficient light sources for outdoor lighting such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is underway. Photometric measures are not sufficient to capture how users experience the light, so complementary tools are required. This study aimed to develop an observer-based environmental assessment tool, based on bipolar semantic differentials, for outdoor lighting in urban spaces. Exploratory (N = 130) and confirmatory (N = 117) factor analyses of observations of lighting installations made by laypersons on-site along pedestrian paths, resulted in two dimensions of high reliability: the Perceived Strength Quality (PSQ, Cronbach's alpha = 0.82–0.85) and the Perceived Comfort Quality (PCQ, Cronbach's alpha = 0.77–0.81). PSQ and PCQ differentiated between light sources of different illuminance level, colour temperature and colour rendering. Regression analyses showed that the perceived lighting qualities helped to explain the variance in visual accessibility, whereas PCQ helped to explain perceived danger in the environment. The perceived lighting qualities can add to the understanding of pedestrians' perception of outdoor lighting, and is proposed as a complementary tool for development of sustainable light designs in the urban environment.  
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  ISSN 0272-4944 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 279  
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Author (up) Keshet-Sitton, A.; Or-Chen, K.; Yitzhak, S.; Tzabary, I.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Can Avoiding Light at Night Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer? Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Integrative Cancer Therapies Abbreviated Journal Integr Cancer Ther  
  Volume 15 Issue 2 Pages 145-152  
  Keywords Human Health; artificial light at night; breast cancer; latency period; rural; short wavelength illumination; urban; oncogenesis; oncology; epidemiology  
  Abstract Excessive exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN) suppresses nocturnal melatonin (MLT) production in the pineal gland and is, therefore, associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (BC). We examined indoor and outdoor light habits of 278 women, BC patients (n = 93), and controls (n = 185; 2010-2014). Cases and controls were age and residential area matched. Data regarding behavior in the sleeping habitat in a 5-year period, 10 to 15 years prior to disease diagnosis, were collected using a questionnaire. Sleep quality, bedtime, sleep duration, TV watching habits, presleeping reading habits, subjective illumination intensity, and type of illumination were collected. Binary logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals (ORs with 95% CIs) for BC patients in relation to those habits. OR results revealed that women who had slept longer (controls), 10 to 15 years before the time of the study, in a period of 5 years, had a significant (OR = 0.74; 95% CI = 0.57-0.97; P < .03) reduced BC risk. Likewise, women who had been moderately exposed to ALAN as a result of reading using bed light (reading lamp) illumination and women who had slept with closed shutters reduced their BC risk: OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.67-0.97, P < .02, and OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.68-0.99, P < .04, respectively. However, women who had been exposed to ALAN as a result of living near strong illumination sources were at a significantly higher BC risk (OR = 1.52; 95% CI = 1.10-2.12; P < .01). These data support the hypothesis that diminishing nighttime light exposure will diminish BC risk and incidence. This hypothesis needs to be tested directly using available testing strategies and technologies that continuously measure an individual's light exposure, its timing, and sleep length longitudinally and feed this information back to the individual, so that BC risk can be distinguished prospectively.  
  Address Atalya Keshet-Sitton, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Faculty of Management, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 31905, Israel. atalyaks(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1534-7354 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:26631258 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1314  
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Author (up) Kleinteich, A.; Schneider, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Developmental strategies in an invasive spider: constraints and plasticity Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Ecological Entomology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 36 Issue 1 Pages 82-93  
  Keywords Animals, arthropod development; bridge spider; dyar; growth patterns; invasive species; larinioides sclopetarius; life-history; plasticity; s rule; urban ecology  
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  ISSN 0307-6946 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 674  
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Author (up) Kloog, I.; Haim, A.; Stevens, R.G.; Portnov, B.A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global co-distribution of light at night (LAN) and cancers of prostate, colon, and lung in men Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 108-125  
  Keywords Circadian Rhythm; Colonic Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Electricity; Humans; Incidence; *Light; Lung Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Male; Prostatic Neoplasms/*epidemiology; Risk Factors; Urban Population; World Health; Oncogenesis  
  Abstract The incidence rates of cancers in men differ by countries of the world. We compared the incidence rates of three of the most common cancers (prostate, lung, and colon) in men residing in 164 different countries with the population-weighted light at night (LAN) exposure and with several developmental and environmental indicators, including per capita income, percent urban population, and electricity consumption. The estimate of per capita LAN exposure was a novel aspect of this study. Both ordinary least squares (OLS) and spatial error (SE) regression models were used in the analysis. We found a significant positive association between population exposure to LAN and incidence rates of prostate cancer, but no such association with lung cancer or colon cancer. The prostate cancer result is consistent with a biological theory and a limited number of previous studies of circadian disruption and risk. The LAN-prostate cancer connection is postulated to be due to suppression of melatonin and/or disruption of clock gene function. An analysis holding other variables at average values across the 164 countries yielded a risk of prostate cancer in the highest LAN-exposed countries 110% higher than in the lowest LAN exposed countries. This observed association is a necessary condition for a potentially large effect of LAN on risk of prostate cancer. However, it is not sufficient due to potential confounding by factors that increase the risk of prostate cancer and are also associated with LAN among the studied countries.  
  Address Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Management, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:19142761 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 163  
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Author (up) Kloog, I.; Portnov, B.A.; Rennert, H.S.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Does the modern urbanized sleeping habitat pose a breast cancer risk? Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int  
  Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 76-80  
  Keywords Human Health; ged; Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects; Breast Neoplasms/*etiology; Case-Control Studies; Circadian Rhythm/*radiation effects; Female; Humans; Light/*adverse effects; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Risk Factors; *Sleep; Urbanization  
  Abstract Due to its disruptive effects on circadian rhythms and sleep deprivation at night, shiftworking is currently recognized as a risk factor for breast cancer (BC). As revealed by the present analysis based on a comparative case-control study of 1679 women, exposure to light-at-night (LAN) in the “sleeping habitat” is significantly associated with BC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.220, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.118-1.311; p < .001), controlling for education, ethnicity, fertility, and alcohol consumption. The novelty of the present research is that, to the best of the authors' knowledge, it is the first study to have identified an unequivocal positive association between bedroom-light intensity and BC risk. Thus, according to the results of the present study, not only should artificial light exposure in the working environment be considered as a potential risk factor for BC, but also LAN in the “sleeping habitat.”  
  Address Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Graduate School of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:21182407 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 770  
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