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Author Abay, K.A.; Amare, M.
Title Night light intensity and women's body weight: Evidence from Nigeria Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Economics and Human Biology Abbreviated Journal Econ Hum Biol
Volume 31 Issue Pages 238-248
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Body Mass Index; *Body Weight; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Lighting/*statistics & numerical data; Middle Aged; Nigeria/epidemiology; Obesity/epidemiology; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prevalence; *Urbanization; Young Adult; *Bmi; *Nigeria; *Night light; *Obesity; *Overweight; *Urbanization
Abstract The prevalence of overweight and obesity are increasing in many African countries and hence becoming regional public health challenges. We employ satellite-based night light intensity data as a proxy for urbanization to investigate the relationship between urbanization and women's body weight. We use two rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey data from Nigeria. We employ both nonparametric and parametric estimation approaches that exploit both the cross-sectional and longitudinal variations in night light intensities. Our empirical analysis reveals nonlinear relationships between night light intensity and women's body weight measures. Doubling the sample's average level of night light intensity is associated with up to a ten percentage point increase in the probability of overweight. However, despite the generally positive relationship between night light intensity and women's body weight, the strength of the relationship varies across the assorted stages of night light intensity. Early stages of night light intensity are not significantly associated with women's body weight, while higher stages of nightlight intensities are associated with higher rates of overweight and obesity. Given that night lights are strong predictors of urbanization and related economic activities, our results hint at nonlinear relationships between various stages of urbanization and women's body weight.
Address International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA. Electronic address: M.Amare@cgiar.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1570-677X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30312904 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2714
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Author Liu, M.; Li, W.; Zhang, B.; Hao, Q.; Xiaowei, G.; Yuchuan, L.
Title Research on the Influence of Weather Conditions on Urban Night Light Environment Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society
Volume 54 Issue Pages 101980
Keywords Skyglow; Weather; sky brightness; Urban
Abstract The increasingly serious urban light pollution has deepened the relevant research, and weather conditions indeed have great impact on the urban night light environment. Based on the SQM instrument, fish-eye camera and weather-related systems, this paper analyzes the changing law of night sky with time and weather. The brightness of the typical clear night sky changes regularly with time, and mainly includes five phases: rapid decline phase, slow decline phase, unstable decline phase, smooth phase, and rapid increase phase of sky brightness. In two phases of the smooth sky brightness, the average sky brightness in the high and low brightness phase respectively is 18.123 mag/arcsecond2 and 18.82 mag/arcsecond2, and about 15 times and 8 times higher than those of the natural night sky. This paper establishes the regression model of typical clear night sky brightness in rapid decline phase and rapid increase phase of sky brightness. The sky magnitude brightness in rainy weather is much lower than that in clear weather, the difference is about 3 mag/arcsecond2, the brightness can be reach 15.63 mag / arcsecond2; the average magnitude brightness in snowy days is about 0.17 mag/arcsecond2 higher than that in cloudy weather. There is a significant correlation among the air quality index, the ground illumination ratio of moon, the atmospheric visibility and the sky brightness. The deepened air pollution can also intensify light pollution, which can increase to 3 and 10 times higher than the night sky brightness under the moderate and severe air pollution. The lunar cycle has the least impact on light pollution in clear days, the sky brightness with the full moon is about 2 and 3 times higher than that without the moon.
Address Corresponding author at: No.2, Ling Gong Road, Gan Jing Zi District, School of Architecture and Fine Art, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liao Ning Province 116024, China; iumingyitj(at)163.com
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2759
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Author Xue, X.; Lin, Y.; Zheng, Q.; Wang, K.; Zhang, J.; Deng, J.; Abubakar, G.A.; Gan, M.
Title Mapping the fine-scale spatial pattern of artificial light pollution at night in urban environments from the perspective of bird habitats Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Sci Total Environ
Volume 702 Issue Pages 134725
Keywords Remote Sensing; Animals; ALAN pollution; Circuitscape; Land cover; Nighttime light image; Urban ecology
Abstract The increase in artificial light at night (ALAN) is a global concern, while the pattern of ALAN pollution inside urban areas has not yet been fully explored. To fill this gap, we developed a novel method to map fine-scale ALAN pollution patterns in urban bird habitats using high spatial resolution ALAN satellite data. First, an ALAN pollution map was derived from JL1-3B satellite images. Then, the core habitat nodes (CHNs) representing the main habitats for urban birds to inhabit were identified from the land cover map, which was produced using Gaofen2 (GF2) data, and the high probability corridors (HPCs), indicating high connectivity paths, were derived from Circuitscape software. Finally, the ALAN patterns in the CHNs and HPCs were analysed, and the mismatch index was proposed to evaluate the trade-off between human activity ALAN demands and ALAN supply for the protection of urban birds. The results demonstrated that 115 woodland patches covering 4149.0ha were selected as CHNs, and most of the CHNs were large urban parks or scenic spots located in the urban fringe. The 2923 modelled HPCs occupying 1179.2ha were small remaining vegetation patches and vegetated corridors along the major transport arteries. The differences in the ALAN pollution patterns between CHNs and HPCs were mainly determined by the characteristics of the green space patches and the light source types. The polluted regions in the CHNs were clustered in a few regions that suffered from concentrated and intensive ALAN, while most of the CHNs remained unaffected. In contrast, the 727 HPCs were mainly polluted by street lighting was scattered and widely distributed, resulting a more varying influence to birds than that in the CHNs. Relating patterns of the ALAN to bird habitats and connectivity provides meaningful information for comprehensive planning to alleviate the disruptive effects of ALAN pollution.
Address College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, Zhejiang, China. Electronic address: ganmuye@zju.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31734607 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2765
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Author Shi, L.; Foody, G.M.; Boyd, D.S.; Girindran, R.; Wang, L.; Du, Y.; Ling, F.
Title Night-time lights are more strongly related to urban building volume than to urban area Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing Letters Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing Letters
Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 29-36
Keywords Remote Sensing; Urban; Night Lights
Abstract A strong relationship between night-time light (NTL) data and the areal extent of urbanized regions has been observed frequently. As urban regions have an important vertical dimension, it is hypothesized that the strength of the relationship with NTL can be increased by consideration of the volume rather than simply the area of urbanized land. Relationships between NTL and the area and volume of urbanized land were determined for a set of towns and cities in the UK, the conterminous states of the USA and countries of the European Union. Strong relationships between NTL and the area urbanized were observed, with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9282 to 0.9446. Higher correlation coefficients were observed for the relationship between NTL and urban building volume, ranging from 0.9548 to 0.9604; The difference in the correlations obtained with volume and with area was statistically significant at the 95% level of confidence. Studies using NTL data may be strengthened by consideration of the volume rather than just area of urbanized land.
Address Key Laboratory for Environment and Disaster Monitoring and Evaluation, Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China; shilingfei14(at)mails.ucas.ac.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Taylor & Francis Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2150-704X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2783
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Kjellberg Jensen, J.; de Jong, M.; Visser, M.E.; Spoelstra, K.
Title Artificial light at night, in interaction with spring temperature, modulates timing of reproduction in a passerine bird Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America Abbreviated Journal Ecol Appl
Volume Issue Pages in press
Keywords Animals; Parus major; Alan; light pollution; phenology; timing of reproduction; urbanization
Abstract The ecological impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) on phenological events such as reproductive timing is increasingly recognized. In birds, previous experiments under controlled conditions showed that ALAN strongly advances gonadal growth, but effects on egg-laying date are less clear. In particular, effects of ALAN on timing of egg-laying are found to be year-dependent, suggesting an interaction with climatic conditions such as spring temperature, which is known have strong effects on the phenology of avian breeding. Thus, we hypothesized that ALAN and temperature interact to regulate timing of reproduction in wild birds. Field studies have suggested that sources of ALAN rich in short wavelengths can lead to stronger advances in egg-laying date. We therefore tested this hypothesis in the great tit (Parus major), using a replicated experimental setup where eight previously unlit forest transects were illuminated with either white, green, or red LED light, or left dark as controls. We measured timing of egg-laying for 619 breeding events spread over six consecutive years and obtained temperature data for all sites and years. We detected overall significantly earlier egg-laying dates in the white and green light versus the dark treatment, and similar trends for red light. However, there was a strong inter-annual variability in mean egg-laying dates in all treatments, which was explained by spring temperature. We did not detect any fitness consequence of the changed timing of egg-laying due to ALAN, which suggests that advancing reproduction in response to ALAN might be adaptive.
Address Plant Ecology and Nature Conservation Group, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language (down) English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31863538 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2805
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