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Author Sutton, P.C.
Title (up) A scale-adjusted measure of “Urban sprawl” using nighttime satellite imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2003 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 86 Issue 3 Pages 353-369
Keywords Urban sprawl; Sprawl Line; Nighttime satellite imagery; DMSP-OLS; remote sensing; satellite; llight at night
Abstract “Urban Sprawl” is a growing concern of citizens, environmental organizations, and governments. Negative impacts often attributed to urban sprawl are traffic congestion, loss of open space, and increased pollutant runoff into natural waterways. Definitions of “Urban Sprawl” range from local patterns of land use and development to aggregate measures of per capita land consumption for given contiguous urban areas (UA). This research creates a measure of per capita land use consumption as an aggregate index for the spatially contiguous urban areas of the conterminous United States with population of 50,000 or greater. Nighttime satellite imagery obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program's Operational Linescan System (DMSP OLS) is used as a proxy measure of urban extent. The corresponding population of these urban areas is derived from a grid of the block group level data from the 1990 U.S. Census. These numbers are used to develop a regression equation between Ln(Urban Area) and Ln(Urban Population). The ‘scale-adjustment’ mentioned in the title characterizes the “Urban Sprawl” of each of the urban areas by how far above or below they are on the “Sprawl Line” determined by this regression. This “Sprawl Line” allows for a more fair comparison of “Urban Sprawl” between larger and smaller metropolitan areas because a simple measure of per capita land consumption or population density does not account for the natural increase in aggregate population density that occurs as cities grow in population. Cities that have more “Urban Sprawl” by this measure tended to be inland and Midwestern cities such as Minneapolis–St. Paul, Atlanta, Dallas–Ft. Worth, St. Louis, and Kansas City. Surprisingly, west coast cities including Los Angeles had some of the lowest levels of “Urban Sprawl” by this measure. There were many low light levels seen in the nighttime imagery around these major urban areas that were not included in either of the two definitions of urban extent used in this study. These areas may represent a growing commuter-shed of urban workers who do not live in the urban core but nonetheless contribute to many of the impacts typically attributed to “Urban Sprawl”. “Urban Sprawl” is difficult to define precisely partly because public perception of sprawl is likely derived from local land use planning decisions, spatio-demographic change in growing urban areas, and changing values and social mores resulting from differential rates of international migration to the urban areas of the United States. Nonetheless, the aggregate measures derived here are somewhat different than similar previously used measures in that they are ‘scale-adjusted’; also, the spatial patterns of “Urban Sprawl” shown here shed some insight and raise interesting questions about how the dynamics of “Urban Sprawl” are changing.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 233
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Author Kuechly, H.U.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Ruhtz, T.; Lindemann, C.; Wolter, C.; Fischer, J.; Hölker, F.
Title (up) Aerial survey and spatial analysis of sources of light pollution in Berlin, Germany Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 126 Issue Pages 39-50
Keywords Light pollution; Artificial lighting; Urban analysis; Remote sensing; GIS; Darkness; Spatial analysis; Light at night
Abstract Aerial observations of light pollution can fill an important gap between ground based surveys and nighttime satellite data. Terrestrially bound surveys are labor intensive and are generally limited to a small spatial extent, and while existing satellite data cover the whole world, they are limited to coarse resolution. This paper describes the production of a high resolution (1 m) mosaic image of the city of Berlin, Germany at night. The dataset is spatially analyzed to identify the major sources of light pollution in the city based on urban land use data. An area-independent ‘brightness factor’ is introduced that allows direct comparison of the light emission from differently sized land use classes, and the percentage area with values above average brightness is calculated for each class. Using this methodology, lighting associated with streets has been found to be the dominant source of zenith directed light pollution (31.6%), although other land use classes have much higher average brightness. These results are compared with other urban light pollution quantification studies. The minimum resolution required for an analysis of this type is found to be near 10 m. Future applications of high resolution datasets such as this one could include: studies of the efficacy of light pollution mitigation measures, improved light pollution simulations, economic and energy use, the relationship between artificial light and ecological parameters (e.g. circadian rhythm, fitness, mate selection, species distributions, migration barriers and seasonal behavior), or the management of nightscapes. To encourage further scientific inquiry, the mosaic data is freely available at Pangaea: http://dx.doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.785492.
Address Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Earth Sciences, Institute for Space Sciences, Carl-Heinrich-Becker-Weg 6‐10, 12165 Berlin, Germany
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 188
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Author Zhou, N.; Hubacek, K.; Roberts, M.
Title (up) Analysis of spatial patterns of urban growth across South Asia using DMSP-OLS nighttime lights data Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Applied Geography Abbreviated Journal Applied Geography
Volume 63 Issue Pages 292-303
Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics; Asia; South Asia; DMSP-OLS; Nighttime Lights; urban; Economic Development; India; Pakistan; Sri Lanka; Nepal; Bangladesh; GIS
Abstract Over the last quarter of a century, analyzing the pace of urbanization and urban economic growth in South Asia has become increasingly important. However, a key challenge relates to the absence of spatially disaggregated national accounts data – in particular, the absence of GDP data for sub-national administrative units and individual cities. The absence of such data limits the scope for detailed empirical analysis of spatial patterns of economic growth, particularly across individual urban settlements or cities. This paper aims to test the suitability of DMSP-OLS Nighttime Lights (NTL) data as a proxy for GDP to analyze detailed spatial patterns of urban economic growth across South Asia over the period 1999–2010. It will help to build an understanding of the nature and heterogeneity of spatial patterns of urban economic growth within the region and contribute to the development of a framework for the usage of NTL to investigate such patterns. Geographic Information System (GIS) is employed to identify the cities and urban agglomerations together with their NTL data in South Asia, and spatial statistics are used to analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of NTL growth. This paper adopts descriptive and inferential statistics to determine the quantitative relationship between NTL and population, urban size, and proximity to the coast. This paper reveals that the inter-annually calibrated NTL data is a good proxy for changes in national and sub-national GDP. In South Asia, the urban NTL hot spots are around major cities with populations between 1.3 and 2.6 million in 1999 and 0.5 to 1.3 million in 2010. Cities in the region have also become more clustered and connected forming urban agglomerations. NTL per unit of land in such clusters tends to be higher than in single cities in South Asia. India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka tend to have higher NTL (economic) growth on average, while Nepal and Bangladesh have lower growth or declining NTL. There exists a very strong positive linear relation between distance to the coast and the total NTL within that distance, which leads to similar NTL growth rates among inland and coastal cities.
Address Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0143-6228 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1240
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Author Perkin, E.K.; Hölker, F.; Tockner, K.; Richardson, J.S.
Title (up) Artificial light as a disturbance to light-naïve streams Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Freshwater Biology Abbreviated Journal Freshw Biol
Volume 59 Issue 11 Pages 2235–2244
Keywords cutthroat trout; drift; invertebrates; light pollution; urbanization; *Fishes; Oncorhynchus clarkii; British Columbia
Abstract Summary

Artificial light at night is prevalent in human-dominated landscapes, and streams in these landscapes can be expected to be affected by artificial lights. We hypothesised that artificial light at night would reduce the activity of aquatic insects, resulting in reduced drift rates, lower fish growth rates and lower leaf litter decomposition rates.

We tested these hypotheses by installing street lights to reaches in four forested, natural streams of coastal British Columbia each paired with a control reach. Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) are the top predators in these streams and feed mostly on terrestrial and drifting aquatic invertebrates.

We found that the night-time drift of aquatic invertebrates in lit reaches was ˜50% of the drift in dark reaches. However, the density of emerging aquatic insects, the density of insects falling into reaches, leaf litter decomposition rate and the number and growth rate of trout caught were not significantly different between the dark and experimentally lit reaches.

We conclude that, while short-term exposure to artificial light during the summer changes invertebrate behaviour, it does not significantly alter other trophic levels in forested headwater streams. Our results suggest that low levels of artificial light do not strongly influence stream ecosystems, but future research should determine whether this is true for all seasons and longer-term exposure to light.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0046-5070 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 361
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Author Robert, K.A.; Lesku, J.A.; Partecke, J.; Chambers, B.
Title (up) Artificial light at night desynchronizes strictly seasonal reproduction in a wild mammal Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci
Volume 282 Issue 1816 Pages
Keywords Animals; Macropus eugenii; anthropogenic disturbance; circadian disruption; light pollution; melatonin; trophic mismatch; ecology; wildlife
Abstract Change in day length is an important cue for reproductive activation in seasonally breeding animals to ensure that the timing of greatest maternal investment (e.g. lactation in mammals) coincides with favourable environmental conditions (e.g. peak productivity). However, artificial light at night has the potential to interfere with the perception of such natural cues. Following a 5-year study on two populations of wild marsupial mammals exposed to different night-time levels of anthropogenic light, we show that light pollution in urban environments masks seasonal changes in ambient light cues, suppressing melatonin levels and delaying births in the tammar wallaby. These results highlight a previously unappreciated relationship linking artificial light at night with induced changes in mammalian reproductive physiology, and the potential for larger-scale impacts at the population level.
Address School of Animal Biology, The University of Western Australia, Perth 6009, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:26423847 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1286
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