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Author Pawson, S.M.; Bader, M.K.-F.
Title LED lighting increases the ecological impact of light pollution irrespective of color temperature Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Ecological Applications Abbreviated Journal Ecological Applications
Volume 24 Issue 7 Pages 1561-1568
Keywords biodiversity; high-pressure sodium lamp; light pollution; spectra; street lighting; urbanization; LED; color temperature; ecology
Abstract Recognition of the extent and magnitude of night-time light pollution impacts on natural ecosystems is increasing, with pervasive effects observed in both nocturnal and diurnal species. Municipal and industrial lighting is on the cusp of a step change where energy-efficient lighting technology is driving a shift from “yellow” high-pressure sodium vapor lamps (HPS) to new “white” light-emitting diodes (LEDs). We hypothesized that white LEDs would be more attractive and thus have greater ecological impacts than HPS due to the peak UV-green-blue visual sensitivity of nocturnal invertebrates. Our results support this hypothesis; on average LED light traps captured 48% more insects than were captured with light traps fitted with HPS lamps, and this effect was dependent on air temperature (significant light × air temperature interaction). We found no evidence that manipulating the color temperature of white LEDs would minimize the ecological impacts of the adoption of white LED lights. As such, large-scale adoption of energy-efficient white LED lighting for municipal and industrial use may exacerbate ecological impacts and potentially amplify phytosanitary pest infestations. Our findings highlight the urgent need for collaborative research between ecologists and electrical engineers to ensure that future developments in LED technology minimize their potential ecological effects.
Address Scion, P.O. Box 29-237, Fendalton, Christchurch, New Zealand
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1051-0761 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 367
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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Partecke, J.
Title Does light pollution alter daylength? A test using light loggers on free-ranging European blackbirds (Turdus merula) Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci
Volume 370 Issue Pages 20140118
Keywords Animals; urbanization; light pollution; artificial light at night; light loggers; daylength; photoperiod; Turdus merula; European blackbird
Abstract Artificial light at night is one of the most apparent environmental changes accompanying anthropogenic habitat change. The global increase in light pollution poses new challenges to wild species, but we still have limited understanding of the temporal and spatial pattern of exposure to light at night. In particular, it has been suggested by several studies that animals exposed to light pollution, such as songbirds, perceive a longer daylength compared with conspecifics living in natural darker areas, but direct tests of such a hypothesis are still lacking. Here, we use a combination of light loggers deployed on individual European blackbirds, as well as automated radiotelemetry,to examine whether urban birds are exposed to a longer daylength than forest counterparts. We first used activity data from forest birds to determine the level of light intensity which defines the onset and offset of daily activity in rural areas. We then used this value as threshold to calculate the subjective perceived daylength of both forest and urban blackbirds. In March, when reproductive growth occurs, urban birds were exposed on average to a 49-min longer subjective perceived daylength than forest ones, which corresponds to a 19-day difference in photoperiod at this time of the year. In the field, urban blackbirds reached reproductive maturity 19 day earlier than rural birds, suggesting that light pollution could be responsible of most of the variation in reproductive timing found between urban and rural dwellers. We conclude that light at night is the most relevant change in ambient light affecting biological rhythms in avian urban-dwellers, most likely via a modification of the perceived photoperiod.
Address Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK; davide.dominoni@glasgow.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Royal Society Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title The biological impacts of artificial light at night: from molecules to communities Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1117
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Author Clewley, G.D.; Plummer, K.E.; Robinson, R.A.; Simm, C.H.; Toms, M.P.
Title The effect of artificial lighting on the arrival time of birds using garden feeding stations in winter: A missed opportunity? Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal Urban Ecosystems
Volume 19 Issue 2 Pages 535–546
Keywords Animals; Artificial light; Citizen science; Foraging; Garden birds; Supplementary feeding; Urbanization
Abstract The proliferation of artificial lighting at night is one of the key anthropogenic changes associated with urbanised areas as well as some non-urban areas. Disruption to natural light/dark regimes can have considerable effects on the timing of different behaviours of birds, particularly during the breeding season. However, the effect of artificial lights on the timing of behaviours during winter has received relatively little attention, despite the fact that time partitioning of foraging can have implications for avian winter survival. In this study, we assess at a landscape scale during winter, whether birds arrive at feeding stations earlier in areas with increased levels of artificial lighting using data from a citizen science project. Arrival times of the ten most commonly recorded species were associated with a combination of the density of artificial lights, temperature, rainfall and urban land cover. We found no evidence that birds advance the onset of foraging in gardens with more artificial lights nearby; contrary to our prediction, birds generally arrived later into these areas. This is possibly a response to differences in food availability or predation risk in areas with more artificial lights. We conclude that artificial light at night may not be as important for driving the timing of foraging behaviour in winter as previously thought, but it remains to be seen whether this represents a missed opportunity to extend the foraging period or an adaptive response.
Address British Trust for Ornithology, The Nunnery, Thetford, Norfolk, IP24 2PU, UK; gary.clewley(at)bto.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Springer Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1083-8155 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) IDA @ john @ Serial 1316
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Author Hasan, N.M.
Title Comparison of the onset of dawn chorus of bulbuls and house sparrows in two different geographical locations: effect of climate, noise and light pollution. Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Research Opinions in Animal & Veterinary Sciences Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 4 Pages 220-225
Keywords Animals; bulbul; Pycnonotidae; house sparrow; Passer domesticus; Tulkarem; Ar-Rayyan; Palestinian Authority; Riyadh; Saudi Arabia; dawn chorus; urbanization
Abstract The onset of dawn chorus was studied for a period of fourteen months for bulbuls (Pycnonotidae) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in two different geographical locations. One is very quiet and semi lit place in the suburbs of the small Mediterranean city of Tulkarem/Palestinian Authority. The other location is comparatively noisy and very well lit place in the Ar-Rayyan urban district of the city of Riyadh/ Saudi Arabia where desert climate prevails. This study is the first of its kind and clearly shows that the timing of dawn chorus is similar for

autumn and winter seasons in both locations but major differences were observed from February until September between the two locations. It can be concluded that very early timing of dawn chorus during spring / summer for the Riyadh location cannot only be attributed to breeding season and is temperature dependent (strong positive correlation, r>0.6). The similarities for autumn and early winter between the two locations is very interesting in that it is not in agreement with the notion that big cities (urbanization) influence the timing of dawn chorus due to noise and light pollution. This emphasizes that dawn chorus is a complex process and that change in the onset and pattern of dawn chorus can not merely be attributed to one variable such as noise or light pollution alone.
Address Department of Basic sciences, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdel Aziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2221-1896 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number (up) LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 397
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Author Hale, J.D.; Fairbrass, A.J.; Matthews, T.J.; Davies, G.; Sadler, J.P.
Title The ecological impact of city lighting scenarios: exploring gap crossing thresholds for urban bats Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Connectivity; Lighting; Movement; Pipistrellus pipistrellus; Scenarios; Urban; Urbanization; gap crossing
Abstract As the global population urbanises, dramatic changes are expected in city lighting and the urban form, which may threaten the functioning of urban ecosystems and the services they deliver. However, little is known about the ecological impact of lighting in different urban contexts. Movement is an important ecological process that can be disrupted by artificial lighting. We explored the impact of lighting on gap crossing for Pipistrellus pipistrellus, a species of bat (Chiroptera) common within UK cities. We aimed to determine whether the probability of crossing gaps in tree cover varied with crossing distance and lighting level, through stratified field surveys. We then used the resulting data on barrier thresholds to model the landscape resistance due to lighting across an entire city and explored the potential impact of scenarios for future changes to street lighting. The level of illumination required to create a barrier effect reduced as crossing distance increased. For those gaps where crossing was recorded, bats selected the darker parts of gaps. Heavily built parts of the case study city were associated with large and brightly lit gaps, and spatial models indicate movement would be highly restricted in these areas. Under a scenario for brighter street lighting, the area of accessible land-cover was further reduced in heavily built parts of the city. We believe that this is the first study to demonstrate how lighting may create resistance to species movement throughout an entire city. That connectivity in urban areas is being disrupted for a relatively common species raises questions about the impacts on less tolerant groups and the resilience of bat communities in urban centres. However, this mechanistic approach raises the possibility that some ecological function could be restored in these areas through the strategic dimming of lighting and narrowing of gaps. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands, United Kingdom
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:25644403 Approved no
Call Number (up) LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 1100
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