|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Komine, H.; Koike, S.; Schwarzkopf, L.
Title Impacts of artificial light on food intake in invasive toads Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 6527
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a major form of anthropogenic disturbance. ALAN attracts nocturnal invertebrates, which are a food source for nocturnal predators, including invasive species. Few studies quantify the effects of increased food availablity by ALAN on invasive vertebrate predators, and enhancement of food intake caused by ALAN may also be influenced by various environmental factors, such as proximitity to cities, moon phase, temperature, rainfall and wind speed. Revealing the potential impacts on invasive predators of ALAN-attracted invertebrates, and the influence of other factors on these effects, could provide important insights for the management of these predators. We constructed and supplied with artificial light field enclosures for invasive toads, and placed them at locations with different levels of ambient light pollution, in northeastern Australia. In addition, we determined the effect of rainfall, temperature, wind speed, and lunar phase on food intake in toads. We found that ALAN greatly increased the mass of gut contents of invasive toads compared to controls, but that the effect was increased in dark lunar phases, and when there were low ambient light pollution levels. Effects of rainfall, temperature and wind speed on food intake were comparatively weak. To avoid providing food resources to toads, management of ALAN in rural areas, and during dark lunar phases may be advisable. On the contrary, to effectively capture toads, trapping using lights as lures at such times and places should be more successful.
Address College of Science and Engineering, Centre for Biodiversity & Climate Change, James Cook University, Townsville, 4811, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32300179 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2882
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Zamorano, J.; Gallego, J.; Gaston, K.J.
Title The nature of the diffuse light near cities detected in nighttime satellite imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue Pages 7829
Keywords Skyglow; Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract Diffuse glow has been observed around brightly lit cities in nighttime satellite imagery since at least the first publication of large scale maps in the late 1990s. In the literature, this has often been assumed to be an error related to the sensor, and referred to as “blooming”, presumably in relation to the effect that can occur when using a CCD to photograph a bright light source. Here we show that the effect seen on the DMSP/OLS, SNPP/VIIRS-DNB and ISS is not only instrumental, but in fact represents a real detection of light scattered by the atmosphere. Data from the Universidad Complutense Madrid sky brightness survey are compared to nighttime imagery from multiple sensors with differing spatial resolutions, and found to be strongly correlated. These results suggest that it should be possible for a future space-based imaging radiometer to monitor changes in the diffuse artificial skyglow of cities.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2909
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, C.; Zhu, H.; Ye, X.; Jiang, C.; Dong, J.; Wang, D.; Wu, Y.
Title Study on Average Housing Prices in the Inland Capital Cities of China by Night-time Light Remote Sensing and Official Statistics Data Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 7732
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract In this paper, the annually average Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) night-time light data is first proposed as a surrogate indicator to mine and forecast the average housing prices in the inland capital cities of China. First, based on the time-series analysis of individual cities, five regression models with gross error elimination are established between average night-time light intensity (ANLI) and average commercial residential housing price (ACRHP) adjusted by annual inflation rate or not from 2002 to 2013. Next, an optimal model is selected for predicting the ACRHPs in 2014 of these capital cities, and then verified by the interval estimation and corresponding official statistics. Finally, experimental results show that the quadratic polynomial regression is the optimal mining model for estimating the ACRHP without adjustments in most provincial capitals and the predicted ACRHP of these cities are almost in their interval estimations except for the overrated Chengdu and the underestimated Wuhan, while the adjusted ACRHP is all in prediction interval. Overall, this paper not only provides a novel insight into time-series ACRHP data mining based on time-series ANLI for capital city scale but also reveals the potentiality and mechanism of the comprehensive ANLI to characterize the complicated ACRHP. Besides, other factors influencing housing prices, such as the time-series lags of government policy, are tested and analysed in this paper.
Address Key Laboratory for Geographical Process Analysing and Modelling, and College of Urban and Environmental Science, Central China Normal University, 152 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, 430079, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32382080 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2914
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Baekelandt, S.; Milla, S.; Cornet, V.; Flamion, E.; Ledore, Y.; Redivo, B.; Antipine, S.; Mandiki, S.N.M.; Houndji, A.; El Kertaoui, N.; Kestemont, P.
Title Seasonal simulated photoperiods influence melatonin release and immune markers of pike perch Sander lucioperca Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 2650
Keywords Animals
Abstract Melatonin is considered as the time-keeping hormone acting on important physiological functions of teleosts. While the influence of melatonin on reproduction and development is well described, its potential role on immune functions has little been considered. In order to better define an immune modulation by the melatonin hormone, we hypothesized that natural variations of photoperiod and subsequent changes in melatonin release profile may act on immune status of pikeperch. Therefore, we investigated during 70 days the effects of two photoperiod regimes simulating the fall and spring in western Europe, on pikeperch physiological and immune responses. Samples were collected at 04:00 and 15:00 at days 1, 37 and 70. Growth, plasma melatonin levels, innate immune markers and expression of immune-relevant genes in head kidney tissue were assessed. While growth and stress level were not affected by the seasonal simulated photoperiods, nocturnal levels of plasma melatonin were photoperiod-dependent. Innate immune markers, including lysozyme, complement, peroxidase and phagocytic activities, were stimulated by the fall-simulated photoperiod and a significant correlation was made with plasma melatonin. In addition to bring the first evidence of changes in fish immunocompetence related to photoperiod, our results provide an additional indication supporting the immunomodulatory action of melatonin in teleosts.
Address Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), Institute of Life, Earth & Environment, University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, Namur, B-5000, Belgium
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32060347; PMCID:PMC7021833 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2942
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Larsen, D.A.; Martin, A.; Pollard, D.; Nielsen, C.F.; Hamainza, B.; Burns, M.; Stevenson, J.; Winters, A.
Title Leveraging risk maps of malaria vector abundance to guide control efforts reduces malaria incidence in Eastern Province, Zambia Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Rep
Volume 10 Issue 1 Pages 10307
Keywords Remote sensing
Abstract Although transmission of malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases is geographically heterogeneous, in sub-Saharan Africa risk maps are rarely used to determine which communities receive vector control interventions. We compared outcomes in areas receiving different indoor residual spray (IRS) strategies in Eastern Province, Zambia: (1) concentrating IRS interventions within a geographical area, (2) prioritizing communities to receive IRS based on predicted probabilities of Anopheles funestus, and (3) prioritizing communities to receive IRS based on observed malaria incidence at nearby health centers. Here we show that the use of predicted probabilities of An. funestus to guide IRS implementation saw the largest decrease in malaria incidence at health centers, a 13% reduction (95% confidence interval = 5-21%) compared to concentrating IRS geographically and a 37% reduction (95% confidence interval = 30-44%) compared to targeting IRS based on health facility incidence. These results suggest that vector control programs could produce better outcomes by prioritizing IRS according to malaria-vector risk maps.
Address University of Montana, Missoula, MT, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32587283; PMCID:PMC7316765 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3025
Permanent link to this record