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Author Shlesinger, T.; Loya, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Breakdown in spawning synchrony: A silent threat to coral persistence Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal (down) Science  
  Volume 365 Issue 6457 Pages 1002-1007  
  Keywords Animals; Coral  
  Abstract The impacts of human and natural disturbances on coral reefs are typically quantified through visible damage (e.g., reduced coral coverage as a result of bleaching events), but changes in environmental conditions may also cause damage in less visible ways. Despite the current paradigm, which suggests consistent, highly synchronized spawning events, corals that reproduce by broadcast spawning are particularly vulnerable because their reproductive phenology is governed by environmental cues. Here, we quantify coral spawning intensity during four annual reproductive seasons, alongside laboratory analyses at the polyp, colony, and population levels, and we demonstrate that, compared with historical data, several species from the Red Sea have lost their reproductive synchrony. Ultimately, such a synchrony breakdown reduces the probability of successful fertilization, leading to a dearth of new recruits, which may drive aging populations to extinction.  
  Address School of Zoology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31488683 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2673  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Bharti, N.; Tatem, A.J.; Ferrari, M.J.; Grais, R.F.; Djibo, A.; Grenfell, B.T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Explaining seasonal fluctuations of measles in Niger using nighttime lights imagery Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Science (New York, N.Y.) Abbreviated Journal (down) Science  
  Volume 334 Issue 6061 Pages 1424-1427  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Cities; Emigration and Immigration; Epidemics; *Epidemiologic Methods; Humans; Light; Measles/*epidemiology/transmission; Niger/epidemiology; *Population Density; Remote Sensing Technology; *Seasons; Spacecraft  
  Abstract Measles epidemics in West Africa cause a significant proportion of vaccine-preventable childhood mortality. Epidemics are strongly seasonal, but the drivers of these fluctuations are poorly understood, which limits the predictability of outbreaks and the dynamic response to immunization. We show that measles seasonality can be explained by spatiotemporal changes in population density, which we measure by quantifying anthropogenic light from satellite imagery. We find that measles transmission and population density are highly correlated for three cities in Niger. With dynamic epidemic models, we demonstrate that measures of population density are essential for predicting epidemic progression at the city level and improving intervention strategies. In addition to epidemiological applications, the ability to measure fine-scale changes in population density has implications for public health, crisis management, and economic development.  
  Address Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. nbharti@princeton.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:22158822; PMCID:PMC3891598 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2770  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dunster, G.P.; de la Iglesia, L.; Ben-Hamo, M.; Nave, C.; Fleischer, J.G.; Panda, S.; de la Iglesia, H.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleepmore in Seattle: Later school start times are associated with more sleep and better performance in high school students Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci. Adv.  
  Volume 4 Issue 12 Pages eaau6200  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Most teenagers are chronically sleep deprived. One strategy proposed to lengthen adolescent sleep is to delay secondary school start times. This would allow students to wake up later without shifting their bedtime, which is biologically determined by the circadian clock, resulting in a net increase in sleep. So far, there is no objective quantitative data showing that a single intervention such as delaying the school start time significantly increases daily sleep. The Seattle School District delayed the secondary school start time by nearly an hour. We carried out a pre-/post-research study and show that there was an increase in the daily median sleep duration of 34 min, associated with a 4.5% increase in the median grades of the students and an improvement in attendance.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2131  
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Author Manriquez, P.H.; Jara, M.E.; Diaz, M.I.; Quijon, P.A.; Widdicombe, S.; Pulgar, J.; Manriquez, K.; Quintanilla-Ahumada, D.; Duarte, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light pollution influences behavioral and physiological traits in a keystone predator species, Concholepas concholepas Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 661 Issue Pages 543-552  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial Light At Night (ALAN) is an increasing global problem that, despite being widely recognized in terrestrial systems, has been studied much less in marine habitats. In this study we investigated the effect of ALAN on behavioral and physiological traits of Concholepas concholepas, an important keystone species of the south-eastern Pacific coast. We used juveniles collected in intertidal habitats that had not previously been exposed to ALAN. In the laboratory we exposed them to two treatments: darkness and white LED (Lighting Emitting Diodes) to test for the impacts of ALAN on prey-searching behavior, self-righting time and metabolism. In the field, the distribution of juveniles was observed during daylight-hours to determine whether C. concholepas preferred shaded or illuminated microhabitats. Moreover, we compared the abundance of juveniles collected during day- and night-time hours. The laboratory experiments demonstrated that juveniles of C. concholepas seek out and choose their prey more efficiently in darkened areas. White LED illuminated conditions increased righting times and metabolism. Field surveys indicated that, during daylight hours, juveniles were more abundant in shaded micro-habitats than in illuminated ones. However, during darkness hours, individuals were not seen to aggregate in any particular microhabitats. We conclude that the exposure to ALAN might disrupt important behavioral and physiological traits of small juveniles in this species which, as a mechanism to avoid visual predators, are mainly active at night. It follows that ALAN in coastal areas might modify the entire community structure of intertidal habitats by altering the behavior of this keystone species.  
  Address Departamento de Ecologia y Biodiversidad, Facultad de Ciencias de la Vida, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago, Chile  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30682607 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2213  
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Author Zhen, J.; Pei, T.; Xie, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Kriging methods with auxiliary nighttime lights data to detect potentially toxic metals concentrations in soil Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication The Science of the Total Environment Abbreviated Journal (down) Sci Total Environ  
  Volume 659 Issue Pages 363-371  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The spatial distribution of potentially toxic metals (PTMs) has been shown to be related to anthropogenic activities. Several auxiliary variables, such as those related to remote sensing data (e.g. digital elevation models, land use, and enhanced vegetation index) and soil properties (e.g. pH, soil type and cation exchange capacity), have been used to predict the spatial distribution of soil PTMs. However, these variables are mostly focused on natural processes or a single aspect of anthropogenic activities and cannot reflect the effects of integrated anthropogenic activities. Nighttime lights (NTL) images, a representative variable of integrated anthropogenic activities, may have the potential to reflect PTMs distribution. To uncover this relationship and determine the effects on evaluation precision, the NTL was employed as an auxiliary variable to map the distribution of PTMs in the United Kingdom. In this study, areas with a digital number (DN)>/=50 and an area>30km(2) were extracted from NTL images to represent regions of high-frequency anthropogenic activities. Subsequently, the distance between the sampling points and the nearest extracted area was calculated. Barium, lead, zinc, copper, and nickel concentrations exhibited the highest correlation with this distance. Their concentrations were mapped using distance as an auxiliary variable through three different kriging methods, i.e., ordinary kriging (OK), cokriging (CK), and regression kriging (RK). The accuracy of the predictions was evaluated using the leave-one-out cross validation method. Regardless of the elements, CK and RK always exhibited lower mean absolute error and root mean square error, in contrast to OK. This indicates that using the NTL as the auxiliary variable indeed enhanced the prediction accuracy for the relevant PTMs. Additionally, RK showed superior results in most cases. Hence, we recommend RK for prediction of PTMs when using the NTL as the auxiliary variable.  
  Address State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources(GPMR), Faculty of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, 430074, China  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30599355 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2494  
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