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Author Depner, C.M.; Melanson, E.L.; McHill, A.W.; Wright, K.P.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mistimed food intake and sleep alters 24-hour time-of-day patterns of the human plasma proteome Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal (down) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 115 Issue 23 Pages E5390-E5399  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Proteomics holds great promise for understanding human physiology, developing health biomarkers, and precision medicine. However, how much the plasma proteome varies with time of day and is regulated by the master circadian suprachiasmatic nucleus brain clock, assessed here by the melatonin rhythm, is largely unknown. Here, we assessed 24-h time-of-day patterns of human plasma proteins in six healthy men during daytime food intake and nighttime sleep in phase with the endogenous circadian clock (i.e., circadian alignment) versus daytime sleep and nighttime food intake out of phase with the endogenous circadian clock (i.e., circadian misalignment induced by simulated nightshift work). We identified 24-h time-of-day patterns in 573 of 1,129 proteins analyzed, with 30 proteins showing strong regulation by the circadian cycle. Relative to circadian alignment, the average abundance and/or 24-h time-of-day patterns of 127 proteins were altered during circadian misalignment. Altered proteins were associated with biological pathways involved in immune function, metabolism, and cancer. Of the 30 circadian-regulated proteins, the majority peaked between 1400 hours and 2100 hours, and these 30 proteins were associated with basic pathways involved in extracellular matrix organization, tyrosine kinase signaling, and signaling by receptor tyrosine-protein kinase erbB-2. Furthermore, circadian misalignment altered multiple proteins known to regulate glucose homeostasis and/or energy metabolism, with implications for altered metabolic physiology. Our findings demonstrate the circadian clock, the behavioral wake-sleep/food intake-fasting cycle, and interactions between these processes regulate 24-h time-of-day patterns of human plasma proteins and help identify mechanisms of circadian misalignment that may contribute to metabolic dysregulation.  
  Address Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Diabetes, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29784788 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1916  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano-Lamphar, H.A.; Videen, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Night-sky radiometry can revolutionize the characterization of light-pollution sources globally Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal (down) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 116 Issue 16 Pages 7712-7717  
  Keywords Skyglow  
  Abstract The city emission function (CEF), describing the angular emission from an entire city as a light source, is one of the key elements in night-sky radiance models. The CEF describes the rate at which skyglow depends on distance and is indispensable in any prediction of light-pollution propagation into nocturnal environments. Nevertheless, the CEF remains virtually unexplored because appropriate retrieval tools have been unavailable until very recently. A CEF has now been obtained from ground-based night-sky observations and establishes an experiment successfully conducted in the field to retrieve the angular emission function for an urban area. The field campaign was conducted near the city of Los Mochis, Mexico, which is well isolated from other cities and thus dominates all light emissions in its vicinity. The experiment has proven that radiometry of a night sky can provide information on the light output pattern of a distant city and allows for systematic, full-area, and cost-efficient CEF monitoring worldwide. A database of CEFs could initiate a completely new phase in light-pollution research, with significant economy and advanced accuracy of night-sky brightness predictions. The experiment and its interpretation represent unique progress in the field and contribute to our fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which direct and reflected uplight interact while forming the CEF.  
  Address Battlefield Environment Division, Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30936314; PMCID:PMC6475415 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2330  
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Author Phillips, A.J.K.; Vidafar, P.; Burns, A.C.; McGlashan, E.M.; Anderson, C.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.; Lockley, S.W.; Cain, S.W. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High sensitivity and interindividual variability in the response of the human circadian system to evening light Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal (down) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 116 Issue 24 Pages 12019-12024  
  Keywords Human Health; circadian rhythms; light sensitivity; circadian disruption; melatonin suppression; evening light  
  Abstract Before the invention of electric lighting, humans were primarily exposed to intense (>300 lux) or dim (<30 lux) environmental light-stimuli at extreme ends of the circadian system's dose-response curve to light. Today, humans spend hours per day exposed to intermediate light intensities (30-300 lux), particularly in the evening. Interindividual differences in sensitivity to evening light in this intensity range could therefore represent a source of vulnerability to circadian disruption by modern lighting. We characterized individual-level dose-response curves to light-induced melatonin suppression using a within-subjects protocol. Fifty-five participants (aged 18-30) were exposed to a dim control (<1 lux) and a range of experimental light levels (10-2,000 lux for 5 h) in the evening. Melatonin suppression was determined for each light level, and the effective dose for 50% suppression (ED50) was computed at individual and group levels. The group-level fitted ED50 was 24.60 lux, indicating that the circadian system is highly sensitive to evening light at typical indoor levels. Light intensities of 10, 30, and 50 lux resulted in later apparent melatonin onsets by 22, 77, and 109 min, respectively. Individual-level ED50 values ranged by over an order of magnitude (6 lux in the most sensitive individual, 350 lux in the least sensitive individual), with a 26% coefficient of variation. These findings demonstrate that the same evening-light environment is registered by the circadian system very differently between individuals. This interindividual variability may be an important factor for determining the circadian clock's role in human health and disease.  
  Address Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia sean.cain@monash.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31138694 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2521  
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Author Hochard, J.P.; Hamilton, S.; Barbier, E.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Mangroves shelter coastal economic activity from cyclones Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal (down) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 116 Issue 25 Pages 12232-12237  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Mangroves; Coastline; Coastal management; Cyclones; weather  
  Abstract Mangroves shelter coastlines during hazardous storm events with coastal communities experiencing mangrove deforestation are increasingly vulnerable to economic damages resulting from cyclones. To date, the benefits of mangroves in terms of protecting coastal areas have been estimated only through individual case studies of specific regions or countries. Using spatially referenced data and statistical methods, we track from 2000 to 2012 the impact of cyclones on economic activity in coastal regions inhabited by nearly 2,000 tropical and subtropical communities across 23 major mangrove-holding countries. We use nighttime luminosity to represent temporal trends in coastal economic activity and find that direct cyclone exposure typically results in permanent loss of 5.4-6.7 mo for a community with an average mangrove extent (6.3 m per meter of coastline); whereas, a community with more extensive mangroves (25.6 m per meter of coastline) experiences a loss equivalent to 2.6-5.5 mo. These results suggest that mangrove restoration efforts for protective benefits may be more cost effective, and mangrove deforestation more damaging, than previously thought.  
  Address Department of Economics and the School of Global Environmental Sustainability, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31160457 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2536  
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Author Quinn, D.; Kress, D.; Chang, E.; Stein, A.; Wegrzynski, M.; Lentink, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title How lovebirds maneuver through lateral gusts with minimal visual information Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Abbreviated Journal (down) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A  
  Volume 116 Issue 30 Pages 15033-15041  
  Keywords Animals; bird; control; flight; gust; visual  
  Abstract Flying birds maneuver effectively through lateral gusts, even when gust speeds are as high as flight speeds. What information birds use to sense gusts and how they compensate is largely unknown. We found that lovebirds can maneuver through 45 degrees lateral gusts similarly well in forest-, lake-, and cave-like visual environments. Despite being diurnal and raised in captivity, the birds fly to their goal perch with only a dim point light source as a beacon, showing that they do not need optic flow or a visual horizon to maneuver. To accomplish this feat, lovebirds primarily yaw their bodies into the gust while fixating their head on the goal using neck angles of up to 30 degrees . Our corroborated model for proportional yaw reorientation and speed control shows how lovebirds can compensate for lateral gusts informed by muscle proprioceptive cues from neck twist. The neck muscles not only stabilize the lovebirds' visual and inertial head orientations by compensating low-frequency body maneuvers, but also attenuate faster 3D wingbeat-induced perturbations. This head stabilization enables the vestibular system to sense the direction of gravity. Apparently, the visual horizon can be replaced by a gravitational horizon to inform the observed horizontal gust compensation maneuvers in the dark. Our scaling analysis shows how this minimal sensorimotor solution scales favorably for bigger birds, offering local wind angle feedback within a wingbeat. The way lovebirds glean wind orientation may thus inform minimal control algorithms that enable aerial robots to maneuver in similar windy and dark environments.  
  Address Mechanical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305; danquinn@virginia.edu dlentink@stanford.edu  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31289235 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2577  
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