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Author Collison, F.M.; Poe, K.
Title “Astronomical Tourism”: The Astronomy and Dark Sky Program at Bryce Canyon National Park Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Tourism Management Perspectives Abbreviated Journal (down) Tourism Management Perspectives
Volume 7 Issue Pages 1-15
Keywords Astronomy-related tourism; National parks; Night sky darkness; astrotourism; dark skies
Abstract Astronomical tourism represents a less-studied segment of sustainable tourism, where a dark night sky is the underlying resource. This article evaluates an astronomical tourism program, in this case at a national park with dark skies for observing. Bryce Canyon National Park (BCNP) in the southwestern United States has a well-developed astronomy program to serve visitors. The program consists of solar viewing during the day, multimedia evening programs, and night-time star gazing with telescopes. Depending on the specific measure used, it appears that up to 10% of park visitors may be involved with the formal Astronomy and Dark Sky Program and/or more informal astronomy activities. BCNP appears well positioned to take advantage of the dark sky attributes of the park and to educate visitors about the importance of maintaining and/or increasing the darkness of night skies. Potential future developments in the program may serve to further increase the number of visitors to BCNP.
Address School of Travel Industry Management, 1901 Ruby Lane, Liberty, MO 64068; collison(at)hawaii.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211-9736 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 128
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Author Mitchell, D.; Gallaway, T.
Title Dark sky tourism: economic impacts on the Colorado Plateau Economy, USA Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Tourism Review Abbreviated Journal (down) Tour. Rev.
Volume 74 Issue 4 Pages 930-942
Keywords Society; tourism; Colorado Plateau; United States; astrotourism
Abstract This paper aims to examine the economic impact from dark-sky tourism in national parks in the USA on the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado Plateau is a region encompassing parts of Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah that is known for its dark, star-filled night skies. Tourists in national parks are increasingly interested in observing this natural recreational amenity – especially considering that it is an ecological amenity that is quickly disappearing from the planet. Using a 10-year forecast of visitors to the national parks and using standard input-output modeling, it is observed that, for the first time anywhere, the value of dark skies to tourism in this area. The authors find that non-local tourists who value dark skies will spend $5.8bn over the next 10 years in the Colorado Plateau. These tourist expenditures will generate $2.4bn in higher wages and create over 10,000 additional jobs each year for the region. Furthermore, as dark skies are even more intense natural amenity in the non-summer months, they have the ability to increase visitor counts to national parks year-round and lead to a more efficient use of local community and tourism-related resources throughout the year.
Address Department of Economics, Missouri State University, Springfield, Missouri, USA;
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Emerald Group Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1660-5373 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2684
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Author Lazar, M.
Title Shedding Light on the Global Distribution of Economic Activity Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication The Open Geography Journal Abbreviated Journal (down) Togeogj
Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 147-160
Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing
Abstract Collection of data on economic variables, especially sub-national income levels, is problematic, due to various shortcomings in the data collection process. Additionally, the informal economy is often excluded from official statistics. Nighttime lights satellite imagery and the LandScan population grid provide an alternative means for measuring economic activity. We have developed a model for creating a disaggregated map of estimated total (formal plus informal) economic activity for countries and states of the world. Regression models were developed to calibrate the sum of lights to official measures of economic activity at the sub-national level for China, India, Mexico, and the United States and at the national level for other countries of the world, and subsequently unique coefficients were derived. Multiplying the unique coefficients with the sum of lights provided estimates of total economic activity, which were spatially distributed to generate a spatially disaggregated 1 km2 map of total economic activity.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1874-9232 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2440
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Author Murphy, B.A.; O’Brien, C.; Elliott, J.A.
Title Red light at night permits the nocturnal rise of melatonin production in horses Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication The Veterinary Journal Abbreviated Journal (down) The Veterinary Journal
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Exposure to white light at night suppresses melatonin production, impacts circadian rhythms and contributes to ill-health in humans. Human interaction with horses frequently occurs at night. We tested the hypothesis that dim red light would not suppress the nightly rise in serum melatonin levels in horses. In a crossover design, six horses were maintained for consecutive 48 h periods under a Light:Red (LR) and a Light:Dark (LD) photo-schedule. Transitions from light (>200 lux, polychromatic white light) to red (5 lux, peak wavelength 625 nm) or dark (<0.5 lux), and vice versa, coincided with ambient sunset and sunrise times. Blood was collected at 2 h intervals for 24 h during each treatment via indwelling jugular catheters. Samples were harvested for serum and stored at −20 °C until assayed for melatonin by radioimmunoassay. Repeated measures two-way ANOVA and t-tests analysed for differences in LR and LD melatonin profiles and their circadian rhythm parameters.

No time x treatment interaction or effect of treatment on serum melatonin levels were demonstrated (P > 0.05). A robust main effect of time (P<0.0001) predominated, with melatonin levels rising at night under both treatments. Statistically significant differences were not observed when LR and LD were compared for circadian rhythm measures of night time peak, area under the curve (AUC), or for times of onset (evening rise), offset (morning decline), or peak duration. Low intensity red light at night did not impact the pattern of melatonin secretion in this study and is, therefore, unlikely to impact the physiology of circadian or seasonal regulation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1090-0233 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2656
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Author BjÖRnberg, T.K.S.; Wilbur, K.M.
Title Copepod Phototaxis And Vertical Migration Influenced By Xanthene Dyes Type Journal Article
Year 1968 Publication The Biological Bulletin Abbreviated Journal (down) The Biological Bulletin
Volume 134 Issue 3 Pages 398-410
Keywords Animals
Abstract 1. Phototaxis of the copepods Paracalanus crassirostris, Calanopia americana, and Acartia lillijeborgi has been measured by determining the percentage of a population moving toward or away from a point source of light per unit time. Quantitative differences in positive phototaxis were found between the species. Photopositive responses differed during the day and night in Acartia but not in Paracalanus and Calanopia.

2. Rhodamine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) brought about the following effects: (a) Locomotor activity was reversibly inhibited in all species. (b) Photopositive responses were increased in Calanopia and Acartia but decreased in Paracalanus. (c) The difference between day and night responses to a point source of light was abolished in Acartia and induced in Calanopia. (d) Somersaulting was induced in Paracalanus but not in the other species.

3. Pyronine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) also decreased locomotor activity. Fluorescein sodium (1.1 x 10-5 M and 1.1 x 10-4 M) was without significant effect.

4. Paracalanus, Calanopia, and Acartia exhibited characteristically distinct diurnal migratory cycles in vertical cylinders, which correlated well with behavior in natural waters. Calanopia and Acartia migrated to the bottom in the daylight whereas Paracalanus and young forms of Acartia were widely distributed vertically during daylight. Specimens of Calanopia and Acartia kept in the dark did not migrate.

5. The effects of rhodamine B (8.4 x 10-6 M) on vertical migration depended upon species, developmental stage, and time of day. In general, rhodamine increased the concentration of animals at the surface at night and at the bottom in daylight. Fluorescein sodium (1.1 x 10-5 M and 1.1 x 10-4 M) had little effect on vertical migration.

6. The effectiveness of rhodamine B and pyronine B is probably related to the presence of diethylamine groups lacking in fluorescein.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0006-3185 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2469
Permanent link to this record