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Author Tossa, P.; Souques, M.
Title Effects of artificial light at night and light pollution on human circadian rhythms Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environnement Risques Santé Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 18 Issue 6 Pages 477-487
Keywords Reveiw; Human Health
Abstract Artificial light is a tangible manifestation of economic and social development, as well as a response to certain needs, especially comfort and civil and road safety. However, this use has been so associated with technological progress that its invasion of daily life has been almost imperceptible. With the recent increase in night lighting (11 million light points in 2016 according to the French Agency for the Environment and Energy Management) and the production of new lamp technologies (in particular light-emitting diodes or LEDs), societal concerns have emerged and are growing. These concerns include light pollution and the impact of blue light on human health and the environment. The scientific community has also taken up the subject, publishing in recent years a large and ever-increasing number of articles on the effects of artificial light at night on fauna and flora as well as on human health. In this review, we propose a synthesis of knowledge on human health effects of light based on scientific reports and an update of recent scientific production.

This review updates knowledge of the chronobiological effects of light at night, particularly blue light. We also briefly describe the potential beneficial effects of light on well-being.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1635-0421 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2806
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Author Ehrlich, D.; Schiavina, M.; Pesaresi, M.; Kemper, T.
Title Detecting spatial pattern of inequalities from remote sensing – Towards mapping of deprived communities and poverty Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication EUR 29465 EN Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume Issue Pages JRC113941
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Spatial inequalities across the globe are not easy to detect and satellite data have shown to be of use in this task. Earth Observation (EO) data combined with other information sources can provide complementary information to those derived from traditional methods. This research shows patterns of inequalities emerging by combining global night lights measured from Earth Observation, population density and built-up in 2015. The focus of the paper is to describe the spatial patterns that emerge by combing the three variables. This work focuses on processing EO data to derive information products, and in combining built-up- and population density with night-time lights emission. The built-up surface was derived entirely from remote sensing archives using artificial intelligence and pattern recognition techniques. The built-up was combined with population census data to derive population density. Also the night-time lights emission data were available from EO satellite sensors. The three layers are subsequently combined as three colour compositions based on the three primary colours (i.e. red, green and blue) to display the “spatial human settlement pattern” maps. These GHSL nightlights provide insights in inequalities across the globe. Many patterns seem to be associated with countries income. Typically, high income countries are very well lit at night, low income countries are poorly lit at night. All larger cities of the world are lit at night, those in low-income countries are often less well lit than cites in high-income countries. There are also important differences in nightlights emission in conflict areas, or along borders of countries. This report provides a selected number of patterns that are described at the regional, national and local scale. However, in depth analysis would be required to assess more precisely that relation between wealth access to energy and countries GDP, for example. This work also addresses regional inequality in GHSL nightlights in Slovakia. The country was selected to address the deprivation of the Roma minority community. The work aims to relate the information from the GHSL nightlights with that collected from field survey and census information conducted at the national level. Socio-economic data available at subnational level was correlated with nightlight. The analysis shows that despite the potential of GHSL nightlights in identifying deprived areas, the measurement scale of satellite derived nightlights at 375 x 375 m to 750 x 750 m pixel size is too coarse to capture the inequalities of deprived communities that occur at finer scale. In addition, in the European context, the gradient of inequality is not strong enough to produce strong evidence. Although there is a specific pattern of GHSL nightlights in settlements with high Roma presence, this cannot be used to identify such areas among the others. This work is part of the exploratory data analysis conducted within the GHSL team. The exploratory analysis will be followed by more quantitative assessments that will be available in future work.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher European Union Place of Publication Luxembourg Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-92-79-97528-8 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2821
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Author Letzkus, L.
Title Red Light at Night: A Feasibility Study in Hospitalized Patients Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication MEDSURG Nursing Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 29 Issue 1 Pages 38-42
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light can be a noxious stimulus during hospitalization. The study evaluated use of a red night-light intervention for hospitalized adults. The red light was found to be a feasible intervention and well received by participants.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2831
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Author Puschnig, J.; Wallner, S.; Posch, T.
Title Circalunar variations of the night sky brightness – an FFT perspective on the impact of light pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 492 Issue 2 Pages 2622-2637
Keywords Skyglow; Moonlight
Abstract Circa-monthly activity conducted by moonlight is observed in many species on Earth. Given the vast amount of artificial light at night (ALAN) that pollutes large areas around the globe, the synchronization to the circalunar cycle is often strongly perturbed. Using 2-yr data from a network of 23 photometers (Sky Quality Meters; SQM) in Austria (latitude ∼48°), we quantify how light pollution impacts the recognition of the circalunar periodicity. We do so via frequency analysis of nightly mean sky brightnesses using Fast Fourier Transforms. A very tight linear relation between the mean zenithal night sky brightness (NSB) given in magSQMarcsec−2 and the amplitude of the circalunar signal is found, indicating that for sites with a mean zenithal NSB brighter than 16.5 magSQMarcsec−2 the lunar rhythm practically vanishes. This finding implies that the circalunar rhythm is still detectable (within the broad bandpass of the SQM) at most places around the globe, but its amplitude against the light polluted sky is strongly reduced. We find that the circalunar contrast in zenith is reduced compared to ALAN-free sites by factors of 19 in the state capital of Linz (∼200 000 inhabitants) and 13 in small towns, e.g. Freistadt and Mattighofen, with less than 10 000 inhabitants. Only two of our sites, both situated in national parks (Bodinggraben and Zöblboden), show natural circalunar amplitudes. At our urban sites, we further detect a strong seasonal signal that is linked to the amplification of anthropogenic skyglow during the winter months due to climatological conditions.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2838
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Author Cavazzani, S.; Ortolani, S.; Bertolo, A.; Binotto, R.; Fiorentin, P.; Carraro, G.; Saviane, I.; Zitelli, V.
Title Sky Quality Meter and satellite correlation for night cloud-cover analysis at astronomical sites Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 493 Issue 2 Pages 2463-2471
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract The analysis of night cloud cover is very important for astronomical observations in real time, considering a typical observation time of about 15 minutes, and to provide statistics. In this article, we use the Sky Quality Meter (SQM) for high-resolution temporal analysis of the La Silla and Asiago (Ekar Observatory) sky: 3 and 5 minutes respectively. We investigate the annual temporal evolution of the natural contributions of the sky at a site not influenced by artificial light at night (ALAN) and at one highly influenced. We also make a correlation between GOES and Aqua satellite data and ground-based SQM data to confirm the relationship between the SQM data and cloud cover. We develop an algorithm that allows the use of the SQM for night cloud detection and reach correlations with the nighttime cloud cover detected by the GOES and Aqua satellites of 97.2 per cent at La Silla and 94.6 per cent at Asiago. Our algorithm also classifies photometric (PN) and spectroscopic nights (SN). We measure 59.1 per cent PN and 21.7 per cent SN for a total percentage of clear nights of 80.8 per cent at La Silla in 2018. The respective Ekar Observatory values are 31.1 per cent PN, 24.0 per cent SN and 55.1 per cent of total clear night time. Application to the SQM network would involve the development of long-term statistics and large data forecasting models for site testing and real-time astronomical observation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2842
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