|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Willett, M.
Title Colonising the Ancient Night? Functions of the Night-Time in Ancient Greek Warfare. Type Manuscript
Year 2019 Publication Leiden University Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Society; warfare; night; ancient world; classics
Abstract In this thesis, I will explore, on an intellectual and sensory level, the ways in which the night time was perceived and utilised in the context of ancient Greek warfare. By ascertaining what activities took place during the night time of the 4th century BC, in a military context, it will become possible to understand more about how the experience of the night was used and presented in antiquity. I will argue that far from being desolate and empty of human presence, the ancient night was a significant time for military activity and that it was in fact used in a variety of interesting ways that are not served by the rather simplistic image of nocturnal ‘colonisation’ presented in Histories of the Early Modern period.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis
Publisher Leiden University Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2908
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Wallner, S.; Kocifaj, M.; Komar, L.; Solano-Lamphar, H.A.
Title Night-sky imaging as a potential tool for characterization of total lumen output from small and medium-sized cities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 494 Issue 4 Pages 5008-5017
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract In this article, the asymptotic formula developed in past work and applied to predict skyglow due to distant sources was evolved, with the objective of characterizing small and medium-sized cities in the observer's surroundings. To enable this, a combination of theoretical computations and in situ measurements is needed, aiming to distinguish between dominant and smaller light-emitting sources, with the latter usually being camouflaged when measuring the night sky. Furthermore, for numerical modelling of skyglow, few of the most important parameters, specifically the amount of total lumens installed and radiated to the upward hemisphere, can be derived. Astronomical observatories, in particular, can profit from this concept, since they are usually situated far away from large cities but can still be surrounded by smaller villages and towns. We present a detailed description of how theoretical computations are combined with all-sky photometry in order to obtain the properties mentioned. Results are compared with satellite data, showing that, regarding approximations undertaken for processing, they are comparable, underlining the functionality of our approach. The idea of including in situ observations enables us to quantify the impact of small and medium-sized cities globally and independent of location, as long as measurements were conducted outside light domes. In addition, the presented work may be of major interest to the light-pollution community if conducting long-term observations of cities, since the quality of commonly used satellite data is going to decrease in the future, due to blindness in short wavelengths and upcoming conversions of public lighting systems to blue-enlightened LEDs.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0035-8711 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2911
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.
Title Urban Lighting Masterplan—Definitions, Methodologies and Collaboration Type Book Chapter
Year 2019 Publication Urban Lighting for People: Evidence—Based Lighting Design for the Built Environment Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume Issue Pages 18–41
Keywords Planning
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher RIBA Publishing Place of Publication London, UK Editor Davoudian, N.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 9780367814588 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2934
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Deal, S.
Title Striking a Balance Between Starry Skies and Urban Illumination Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Water Log Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 40 Issue 2 Pages
Keywords Planning; Ecology; Skyglow; Commentary
Abstract For countless centuries, people have looked up at the night sky in awe and wonder. However, the starry night skies have been increasingly subsumed by ambient light from cities. Many urban areas across the world are over illuminated, leaving city dwellers unable to take in the natural day-night pattern of the skies. This disruption is not merely a setback for stargazers; excessive lighting from city streets can have an adverse impact on wildlife and human welfare. Sea turtle hatchlings, which instinctively crawl towards the night sky to reach the safety of the ocean, may be enticed by the stronger

glow of nearby streetlights. Artificial lights also steer migratory bird species off course and interfere with their ability to detect ideal conditions for nesting.

1 Overly bright lighting in residential areas can disrupt human sleeping

habits as well. These impacts associated with excess lighting

show that cities have an important role to play in regulating

lighting sources
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2944
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Dick, R.
Title The Biological Basis for the Canadian Guideline for Outdoor Lighting 1. General Scotobiology Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Abbreviated Journal (up)
Volume 114 Issue 3 Pages 122-126
Keywords Biology; Ecology
Abstract The subject of limiting outdoor lighting seems straightforward- it saves electricity and reduces glare, but society has a predilection for activity at night that requires more than natural light. This extends beyond urban areas. “Cottage country” is well lit along the shoreline, and even campgrounds filled with amateur astronomers have lots of unshielded lights. Although these tend to be red, they still undermine our night vision (Dick, 2016) and change the nocturnal ambience. The main problem of whether outdoor lighting is good or bad depends on who is judge. Is there a less equivocal way to assess or define acceptable outdoor lighting, especially in rural areas? Must rural lighting follow “Best Practices” for cities? This is the first in a series of papers that will discuss the science behind the ecological impacts of artificial (anthropogenic) light at night. It will propose rational solutions to reduce these impacts and will define the characteristics of artificial light that minimize these disruptions that we call lighting with “low-ecological impact.” Although taking an ecological approach to outdoor lighting is unusual, we have observed that if the nocturnal environment is preserved for wildlife, it is usually sufficient for astronomy. Although it is understood that observatories may require a curfew during the three weeks centred on the new Moon. This first paper will set the stage for this somewhat unorthodox exploration into light.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2945
Permanent link to this record