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Author Ciach, M., & Fröhlich, A. doi  openurl
  Title Ungulates in the city: light pollution and open habitats predict the probability of roe deer occurring in an urban environment Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Urban Ecosystems Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 22 Issue 3 Pages 513–523  
  Keywords Animals; ungulates; Poland; Europe; roe deer; Capreolus capreolus  
  Abstract Although large and medium-sized herbivorous mammals avoid urbanized areas, they have recently begun to colonize towns and cities. In general, ungulates continue to avoid the centres of urban areas, and utilize mainly their thinly built-up outskirts. While extension of urban development is preventing ungulates from penetrating the urban landscape, the influence of noise and light pollution on the occurrence of mammalian herbivores is still poorly understood. Hence, we investigated the hypothesis that habitat availability shapes the distribution of roe deer Capreolus capreolus and artificial lightening discourages them from penetrating the urban landscape. Roe deer was recorded on 37% of randomly selected sample plots (N = 60) located within the city of Kraków (S Poland). The occupied plots contained significantly more open habitats, woodland patches were larger in them, but proximity to rivers, and noise and light pollution were significantly lower. The logistic regression model revealed that an increasing area of open habitats was positively correlated with the probability of roe deer occurring. However, the artificial lighting at night was negatively correlated with the probability of the species occurring: the negative effect of light pollution was mitigated by the greater area of open habitats. Our study highlights the very considerable potential of light pollution as a predictor of the occurrence of large mammals in the urban landscape. We argue that urbanization and the related artificial lighting at night may be a factor preventing ungulates from penetrating potentially suitable habitats in urban areas.  
  Address Department of Forest Biodiversity, Institute of Forest Ecology and Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry, University of Agriculture, Kraków, Poland; michal.ciach(at)ur.krakow.pl  
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2305  
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Author Seymoure, B. M., Linares, C., & White, J. doi  openurl
  Title Connecting spectral radiometry of anthropogenic light sources to the visual ecology of organisms Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 308 Issue 2 Pages 93-110  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology; color space; ecological consequences; just noticeable difference; light pollution; photoreceptors; radiance; visual models; visual systems  
  Abstract Humans have drastically altered nocturnal environments with electric lighting. Animals depend on natural night light conditions and are now being inundated with artificial lighting. There are numerous artificial light sources that differ in spectral composition that should affect the perception of these light sources and due to differences in animal visual systems, the differences in color perception of these anthropogenic light sources should vary significantly. The ecological and evolutionary ramifications of these perceptual differences of light sources remain understudied. Here, we quantify the radiance of nine different street lights comprised of four different light sources: Metal Halide, Mercury Vapor, Light Emitting Diodes, and High‐Pressure Sodium and model how five animal visual systems will be stimulated by these light sources. We calculated the number of photons that photoreceptors in different visual systems would detect. We selected five visual systems: avian UV/VIS, avian V/VIS, human, wolf and hawk moth. We included non‐visual photoreceptors of vertebrates known for controlling circadian rhythms and other physiological traits. The nine light types stimulated visual systems and the photoreceptors within the visual systems differently. Furthermore, we modelled the chromatic contrast (Just Noticeable Differences [JNDs]) and color space overlap for each light type comparison for each visual system to see if organisms would perceive the lights as different colors. The JNDs of most light type comparisons were very high, indicating most visual systems would detect all light types as different colors, however mammalian visual systems would perceive many lights as the same color. We discuss the importance of understanding not only the brightness of artificial light types, but also the spectral composition of light types, as most organisms have different visual systems from humans. Thus, for researchers to understand how artificial light sources affect the visual environment of specific organisms and thus mitigate the effects, spectral information is crucial.  
  Address Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA; brett.seymoure(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher ZSL Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2306  
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Author Garrett, J. K., Donald, P. F., & Gaston, K. J. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Skyglow extends into the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages cv.12480  
  Keywords Skyglow; Conservation; Biodiversity; Key Biodiversity Area; KBA  
  Abstract The proportion of the Earth’s surface that experiences a naturally dark environment at night is rapidly declining with the introduction of artificial light. Biological impacts of this change have been documented from genes to ecosystems, and for a wide diversity of environments and organisms. The likely severity of these impacts depends heavily on the relationship between the distribution of artificial night-time lighting and biodiversity. Here, we carry out a global assessment of the overlap between areas of conservation priority and the most recent atlas of artificial skyglow. We show that of the world’s Key Biodiversity Areas (KBAs), less than a third have completely pristine night-time skies, about a half lie entirely under artificially bright skies and only about a fifth contain no area in which night-time skies are not polluted to the zenith. The extent of light pollution of KBAs varies by region, affecting the greatest proportion of KBAs in Europe and the Middle East. Statistical modelling revealed associations between light pollution within KBAs and associated levels of both gross domestic product and human population density. This suggests that these patterns will worsen with continued economic development and growth in the human population  
  Address Environment & Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, UK; j.k.garrett(at)exeter.ac.uk  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2309  
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Author Peregrym, M., Kónya E. P., & Vasyliuk, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) on the National Nature Parks, Biosphere and Naturе Reserves of the Steppe Zone and Crimean Mountains within Ukraine Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Palaearctic Grasslands Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; Conservation  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) and sky glow are a recognized anthropogenic pressure, but the consequences of this pressure on protected areas within Ukraine are unclear. This research attempted to estimate the level of light pollution on the protected territories of the National Nature Parks (NNPs), Biosphere and Nature Reserves in the Steppe Zone and Crimea Mountains of Ukraine. Kmz layers of

these protected territories and the New World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness, through Google Earth Pro, were used to calculate the level of artificial sky brightness for 15 NNPs, three Biosphere Reserves and 10 Nature Reserves. The results show that even some of the most protected areas within the Steppe Zone and Crimean Mountains are impacted by ALAN. Of the studied protected areas 44.2% have a natural dark night sky, 40.1% have artificial brightness ranging between 8 and 16%, and the remainder (15.7%) are polluted with an artificial brightness greater than 16%. Areas with light pollution greater than 16% are often situated near big cities or industrial centers. It was noted that light pollution levels were not taken into account during the creation of any protected areas within Ukraine.
 
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  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2310  
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Author Frank, T. M., Gabbert, W. C., Chaves-Campos, J., & LaVal, R. K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Impact of artificial lights on foraging of insectivorous bats in a Costa Rican cloud forest Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Journal of Tropical Ecology Abbreviated Journal (up)  
  Volume 35 Issue 1 Pages 8-17  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Determining the effects of light pollution on tropical bat communities is important for understanding community assembly rules in urban areas. Studies from temperate regions suggest that, among aerial insectivorous bats, fast-flying species that forage in the open are attracted to artificial lights, whereas slow-flying species that forage in cluttered environments avoid those lights. We measured aerial insectivore responses to light pollution in a tropical cloud forest to test this hypothesis. Bat echolocation was recorded at 20 pairs of light and dark sites in Monteverde, Costa Rica. Foraging activity was higher at artificially lighted sites than dark sites near the new moon, especially around blue-white fluorescent lighting. Most recorded bat species showed increased or unchanged activity in response to light, including some slow-flying and edge-foraging bats. This finding suggests that, contrary to the evaluated hypothesis, flight speed and foraging mode are not sufficient to determine bat responses to artificial lights in the tropics. Two bat species showed decreased activity at light sites, and a low species evenness was recorded around lights, particularly fluorescent lights, compared with dark sites. As in the temperate zone, light pollution in the tropics seems to concentrate certain bat species around human-inhabited areas, potentially shifting community structure.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2311  
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