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Author Rodríguez Martín, A.; Holmberg, R.; Dann, P.; Chiaradia, A.
Title Penguin colony attendance under artificial lights for ecotourism Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 457-464
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) Wildlife watching is an emerging ecotourism activity around the world. In Australia and New Zealand, night viewing of little penguins attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors per year. As penguins start coming ashore after sunset, artificial lighting is essential to allow visitors to view them in the dark. This alteration of the nightscape warrants investigation for any potential effects of artificial lighting on penguin behavior. We experimentally tested how penguins respond to different light wavelengths (colors) and intensities to examine effects on the colony attendance behavior at two sites on Phillip Island, Australia. At one site, nocturnal artificial illumination has been used for penguin viewing for decades, whereas at the other site, the only light is from the natural night sky. Light intensity did not affect colony attendance behaviors of penguins at the artificially lit site, probably due to penguin habituation to lights. At the not previously lit site, penguins preferred lit paths over dark paths to reach their nests. Thus, artificial light might enhance penguin vision at night and consequently it might reduce predation risk and energetic costs of locomotion through obstacle and path detection. Although penguins are faithful to their path, they can be drawn to artificial lights at small spatial scale, so light pollution could attract penguins to undesirable lit areas. When artificial lighting is required, we recommend keeping lighting as dim and time-restricted as possible to mitigate any negative effects on the behavior of penguins and their natural habitat.
Address Research Department, Phillip Island Nature Parks, Cowes, Victoria, Australia
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ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29603671 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1834
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Author Maurer, A. S., Thawley, C. J., Fireman, A. L., Giery, S. T., & Stroud, J.T.
Title Nocturnal Activity of Antiguan Lizards Under Artificial Light Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Herpetological Conservation and Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 14 Issue 1 Pages 105–110
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) Widespread human development has led to the proliferation of artificial light at night, an increasingly recognized but poorly understood component of anthropogenic global change. Animals specialized to diurnal activity are presented opportunities to use this night-light niche, but the ecological consequences are largely unknown. While published records make note of nocturnal activity in a diversity of diurnal taxa, few case studies have gone beyond isolated observations to quantify patterns of nocturnal activity, document animal behavior, and describe new species interactions. From 13 June to 15 July 2017, we conducted hourly nocturnal surveys to assess how two species of diurnal Anolis lizards (Leach’s Anole, Anolis leachii, and Watt’s Anole, A. wattsi) use artificial light on Long Island, Antigua. Our data show that both anole species foraged in artificially illuminated habitats and were more active prior to sunrise compared to the early night. Mark-resight data for a focal species, A. leachii, suggest that patterns of nocturnal activity were not significantly different between individuals. Finally, our behavioral observations for the two anoles and a third lizard species, the nocturnal Thick-tailed Gecko (Thecadactylus rapicauda), reveal a lack of agonistic interactions. Our study reveals an altered temporal niche for two diurnal Antiguan lizards and adds to a growing body of evidence documenting the broad influences of anthropogenic change on biodiversity
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Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2472
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Author Garratt, M.J.; Jenkins, S.R.; Davies, T.W.
Title Mapping the consequences of artificial light at night for intertidal ecosystems Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment
Volume 691 Issue Pages 760-768
Keywords Ecology; Lighting
Abstract (down) Widespread coastal urbanization has resulted in artificial light pollution encroaching into intertidal habitats, which are highly valued by society for ecosystem services including coastal protection, climate regulation and recreation. While the impacts of artificial light at night in terrestrial and riparian ecosystems are increasingly well documented, those on organisms that reside in coastal intertidal habitats are less well explored. The distribution of artificial light at night from seaside promenade lighting was mapped across a sandy shore, and its consequences for macroinvertebrate community structure quantified accounting for other collinear environmental variables known to shape biodiversity in intertidal ecosystems (shore height, wave exposure and organic matter content). Macroinvertebrate community composition significantly changed along artificial light gradients. Greater numbers of species and total community biomass were observed with increasing illumination, a relationship that was more pronounced (increased effects size) with increasing organic matter availability. Individual taxa exhibited different relationships with artificial light illuminance; the abundances of 27% of non-rare taxa [including amphipods (Amphipoda), catworms (Nephtys spp.), and sand mason worms (Lanice conchilega)] decreased with increasing illumination, while 20% [including tellins (Tellinidae spp.), lugworms (Arenicola marina) and ragworms (Nereididae spp.)] increased. Possible causes of these relationships are discussed, including direct effects of artificial light on macroinvertebrate behaviour and indirect effects via trophic interactions. With increasing light pollution in coastal zones around the world, larger scale changes in intertidal ecosystems could be occurring.
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ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2590
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Author Davies, T.W.; Bennie, J.; Cruse, D.; Blumgart, D.; Inger, R.; Gaston, K.J.
Title Multiple night-time light-emitting diode lighting strategies impact grassland invertebrate assemblages Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol
Volume 23 Issue 7 Pages 2641-2648
Keywords Ecology; grasslands; LED
Abstract (down) White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are rapidly replacing conventional outdoor lighting technologies around the world. Despite rising concerns over their impact on the environment and human health, the flexibility of LEDs has been advocated as a means of mitigating the ecological impacts of globally widespread outdoor night-time lighting through spectral manipulation, dimming and switching lights off during periods of low demand. We conducted a three-year field experiment in which each of these lighting strategies was simulated in a previously artificial light naive grassland ecosystem. White LEDs both increased the total abundance and changed the assemblage composition of adult spiders and beetles. Dimming LEDs by 50% or manipulating their spectra to reduce ecologically damaging wavelengths partially reduced the number of commoner species affected from seven to four. A combination of dimming by 50% and switching lights off between midnight and 04:00 am showed the most promise for reducing the ecological costs of LEDs, but the abundances of two otherwise common species were still affected. The environmental consequences of using alternative lighting technologies are increasingly well established. These results suggest that while management strategies using LEDs can be an effective means of reducing the number of taxa affected, averting the ecological impacts of night-time lighting may ultimately require avoiding its use altogether.
Address Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK
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Publisher Wiley Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28139040 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1634
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Author Suk, J.Y.; Walter, R.
Title Street Lighting and Public Safety: New Nighttime Lighting Documentation Method Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication ARCC Conference Repository Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Public Safety; Lighting
Abstract (down) While the rapid transition of street lighting technologies is occurring across the country for its promising benefits of high energy efficiency, higher intensity, long lamp life, and low maintenance, there is a lack of understanding on the impacts from street lighting’s physical characteristics on public safety. Nighttime lighting and its impact on the incidence of crime and roadway accidents has been investigated since the 1960s in the United States and the United Kingdom. However, prior research has not presented any scientific evidence such as quantified lighting characteristic data and its impacts on public safety because they relied on subjective survey inputs or over-simplified quantification of nighttime lighting conditions. To overcome the limitation of previous studies, extensive documentation of street lighting characteristics was conducted in downtown San Antonio, Texas, which adopts both conventional and new street lighting technologies. Two different sets of light level data were collected on roadways in order to measure the amount of light falling on the ground and on drivers’ eyes inside a car. Correlated color temperature and a color rendering index of nighttime lighting were recorded. The collected lighting data was mapped in a Geographic Information Systems database in order to spatially analyze lighting characteristics. The paper first highlights the potential issues with lighting analysis in previous studies. Next, the proposed research methodology to address these issues for both data collection and spatial analyses is explained. Finally, the preliminary documentation and analysis of street lighting characteristics are presented.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2103
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