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Author Dominoni, D.M.; Smit, J.A.H.; Visser, M.E.; Halfwerk, W.
Title Multisensory pollution: Artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise have interactive effects on activity patterns of great tits (Parus major) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume 256 Issue Pages 113314
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) Urbanisation is increasing globally at a rapid pace. Consequently, wild species face novel environmental stressors associated with urban sprawl, such as artificial light at night and noise. These stressors have pervasive effects on the behaviour and physiology of many species. Most studies have singled out the impact of just one of these stressors, while in the real world they are likely to co-occur both temporally and spatially, and we thus lack a clear understanding of the combined effect of anthropogenic stressors on wild species. Here, we experimentally exposed captive male great tits (Parus major) to artificial light at night and 24 h noise in a fully factorial experiment. We then measured the effect of both these stressors on their own and their combination on the amount and timing of activity patterns. We found that both light and noise affected activity patterns when presented alone, but in opposite ways: light increased activity, particularly at night, while noise reduced it, particularly during the day. When the two stressors were combined, we found a synergistic effect on the total activity and the nighttime activity, but an antagonistic effect on daytime activity. The significant interaction between noise and light treatment also differed among forest and city birds. Indeed, we detected a significant interactive effect on light and noise on daytime, nighttime, dusktime and offset of activity of urban birds, but not of forest birds. These results suggest that both artificial light at night and anthropogenic noise can drive changes in activity patterns, but that the specific impacts depend on the habitat of origin. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that co-occurring exposure to noise and light can lead to a stronger impact at night than predicted from the additive effects and thus that multisensory pollution may be a considerable threat for wildlife.
Address Department of Animal Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, the Netherlands; avide.dominoni(at)glasgow.ac.uk
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2744
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Author Lee, J.G.-H.; MacGregor-Fors, I.; Yeh, P.J.
Title Sunrise in the city: disentangling drivers of the avian dawn chorus onset in urban greenspaces Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Journal of Avian Biology Abbreviated Journal J Avian Biol
Volume 48 Issue 7 Pages 955-964
Keywords Animals
Abstract (down) Urban systems are known to have a number of effects on avian diversity, density, and morphological and behavioral traits. However, no study to date has simultaneously examined the wide range of urban variables in relation to the avian dawn chorus, a complex behavioral phenomenon. Previous studies investigating adjustments of the dawn chorus onset in urban settings have mainly been confined to relationships with noise and light levels. In addition to noise and light levels, in this study we included other potentially related environmental characteristics describing vegetation structure, urban infrastructure, and human activity, all of which have been shown to be drivers of bird diversity in urban areas. We conducted dawn chorus surveys at 38 Los Angeles urban greenspaces and used a classification and regression tree analysis to identify specific urban scenarios that best explained timing differences in the dawn chorus onset. Our results show that light level was the most important determinant of the dawn chorus onset time, in which, counter-intuitively, bird communities in greenspaces with higher light levels had later onsets. In addition, noise was an important factor for the chorus onset in greenspaces with higher light levels. Although our results differ from those of previous studies, these findings highlight the importance of noise and light levels in explaining dawn chorus onset variation, indicating the need for further research in untangling this complex and ecologically important phenomenon.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0908-8857 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1623
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Author Xia, C.; Yeh, A.G.-O.; Zhang, A.
Title Analyzing spatial relationships between urban land use intensity and urban vitality at street block level: A case study of five Chinese megacities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Landscape and Urban Planning Abbreviated Journal Landscape and Urban Planning
Volume 193 Issue Pages 103669
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) Urban sprawl in urbanizing China has resulted in a series of ecological and environmental problems. Urban planners have been committed to promoting compact development through high-density and mixed land use. However, a problem brought by such compact urban form is the mismatch between physical spaces and socio-economic activities. To date, minimal research has been conducted using spatial statistics to study this issue at the local scales. Moreover, urban night-time vitality has been consistently ignored in existing studies. In the current work, urban land use intensity was analyzed on the basis of street block density and typology, and urban daytime and night-time vitality were measured using small catering business and night-time light data, respectively. The spatial relationships between urban land use intensity and urban vitality were investigated using a local indicator of spatial association (LISA), and five megacities in China were taken as a case study to examine whether variations exist between different cities. Results showed a significant positive spatial autocorrelation between urban land use intensity and urban vitality according to global statistics. Therefore, socio-economic activities are more likely to be abundant in densely developed urban areas. However, local spatial mismatches were found in the five megacities, indicating overcrowded or underutilized urban spaces in all the cities. These relationships were associated with different urban areas (urbanized before 1995 and during 1995–2015), land use conditions (function and mixture) and time periods (day and night). The results of this work will provide a comprehensive understanding of compact city and sustainability.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0169-2046 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2697
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Author Welch, R.
Title Monitoring urban population and energy utilization patterns from satellite Data Type Journal Article
Year 1980 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 1-9
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (down) Urban population trends in China and energy utilization patterns in the United States have been assessed from LANDSAT and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) images. Regression models developed from population (P) data and urban area (A) measurements on LANDSAT images are of the form P = αAb and provide insights into the success of Chinese urban planning policies for cities with populations of 500,000 to 2,000,000 people. Studies of the relationships between population, urban area, and electric-energy utilization patterns have been conducted from DMSP images of the United States. Microdensitometer profiles of illuminated cities recorded on nighttime (visual band) images are used in combination with the map boundaries of the built-up areas to create unique three-dimensional representations of the urban centers. The volumes of these three-dimensional figures may be computed and plotted with respect to population and/or energy utilization data to model regional patterns of use. Improvements in the quality of sensor data should increase the potential for monitoring urban energy demands and populations.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2382
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Author Kazemidemneh, M.; Mahdavinejad, M.
Title Use of Space Syntax Technique to Improve the Quality of Lighting and Modify Energy Consumption Patterns in Urban Spaces Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication European Journal of Sustainable Development Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue 2 Pages 29-40
Keywords Lighting
Abstract (down) Urban lighting is one of the significant issues that urban designers and architects are facing, and it has received a special attention in recent years. Urban lighting pursues critical goals such as preserving the livability of the city during nighttime, providing a sense of security, maintaining the city‟s readability, etc. Use of incompatible patterns for lighting design wastes significant amount of energy annually. A master lighting plan for urban areas should be recommended to achieve these goals and prevent wasteful energy use in lighting. One of the solutions for designing an appropriate plan is to notice the pedestrian traffic pattern in the city by considering space syntax model and integration maps analysis. In this research, one of Tehran‟s regions has been chosen and its integration map has been generated using appropriate software. Tehran is selected as case study of this research while the results might be applied in other similar cities especially in developing countries. First, based on the integration degree of the passages which reveals pedestrian traffic pattern and considering recommended illuminance standards, the average required lighting has been determined. Second, comparing the measured lighting intensity and the standard amounts reveals the correlation between the presented urban lighting and energy consumption model. Eventually, different solutions for appropriate urban lighting design based on acceptable energy consumption patterns have been suggested.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2096
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