|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Grove, L.
Title Reducing Acadia's Light Pollution Type Manuscript
Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Conservation; Society; Economics; Acadia National Park; Maine; benefit cost analysis; astrotourism; contingent valuation method; dark sky places; dark sky park
Abstract (up) Acadia National Park is among the most visited national parks in the United States, attracting millions of people per year. Thousands of those visitors come to the park for “astro-tourism,” as Acadia has become one of the premier stargazing locations on the east coast. There remains, however, the continued threat from light pollution from the surrounding communities that negatively affects Acadia's darkness, contributing to a lesser visitor experience and potentially harming native ecosystems. Although park management and community organizations have engaged in significant efforts to decrease Acadia's nighttime light levels and raise awareness among visitors and locals regarding the importance of darkness, the park still seek to continue to decrease light pollution. This report developed policy options that could help solve the long-term policy goal of decreasing nighttime lighting levels within and around Acadia while also using the International Dark-Sky Association's Dark-Sky Park designation requirements as a reasonable, short-term policy benchmark.

Working within existing organizations, the policy options crafted to address Acadia’s nighttime lighting levels were analyzed both qualitatively through a criteria evaluation and quantitatively through a Benefit Cost Analysis.

The options included 1) the formation of a Darkness Coalition within the League of Towns, 2) a reimagining of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Dark-Sky Project into the Dark-Sky Taskforce, 3) the creation of a Lighting Consultant position paid through the Friends of Acadia Wild Acadia initiative, and 4) the combination of Coalition and the Taskforce into the League of Towns – Dark-Sky Partnership (LOT-DSP). The report recommends the adoption of Option 4 – the creation of the LOT – DSP. While this option does not provide the greatest estimated monetary net value compared to the Status Quo in the quantitative evaluation, it still provides an estimated benefit of about $105 million over the course of five years and is the strongest option in the qualitative analysis. The LOT – DSP provides the best opportunity for Acadia to achieve legitimate and long-lasting nighttime light level reduction.
Address Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, Garrett Hall, 235 McCormick Road, P.O. Box 400893, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4893 USA; locher.grove(at)gmail.com
Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis
Publisher University of Virginia Place of Publication Charlottesville Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1449
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, S.; Cheng, L.; Liu, X.; Mao, J.; Wu, J.; Li, M.
Title City type-oriented modeling electric power consumption in China using NPP-VIIRS nighttime stable light data Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Energy Abbreviated Journal Energy
Volume 189 Issue Pages 116040
Keywords Energy; Remote Sensing; China; electric power consumption; Night lights; Nighttime light; VIIRS-DNB
Abstract (up) Accelerating urbanization has created tremendous pressure on the global environment and energy supply, making accurate estimates of energy use of great importance. Most current models for estimating electric power consumption (EPC) from nighttime light (NTL) imagery are oversimplified, ignoring influential social and economic factors. Here we propose first classifying cities by economic focus and then separately estimating each category’s EPC using NTL data. We tested this approach using statistical employment data for 198 Chinese cities, 2015 NTL data from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and annual electricity consumption statistics. We used cluster analysis of employment by sector to divide the cities into three types (industrial, service, and technology and education), then established a linear regression model for each city's NTL and EPC. Compared with the estimation results before city classification (R2: 0.785), the R2 of the separately modeled service cities and technology and education cities increased to 0.866 and 0.830, respectively. However, the results for industrial cities were less consistent due to their more complex energy consumption structure. In general, using classification before modeling helps reflect factors affecting the relationship between EPC and NTL, making the estimation process more reasonable and improving the accuracy of the results.
Address School of Geography and Ocean Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210023, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0360-5442 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2672
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Li, K.; Chen, Y.
Title A Genetic Algorithm-Based Urban Cluster Automatic Threshold Method by Combining VIIRS DNB, NDVI, and NDBI to Monitor Urbanization Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 277
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Accurate and timely information related to quantitative descriptions and spatial distributions of urban areas is crucial to understand urbanization dynamics and is also helpful to address environmental issues associated with rapid urban land-cover changes. Thresholding is acknowledged as the most popular and practical way to extract urban information from nighttime lights. However, the difficulty of determining optimal threshold remains challenging to applications of this method. In order to address the problem of selecting thresholds, a Genetic Algorithm-based urban cluster automatic threshold (GA-UCAT) method by combining Visible-Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite Day/Night band (VIIRS DNB), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and Normalized Difference Built-up Index (NDBI) is proposed to distinguish urban areas from dark rural background in NTL images. The key point of this proposed method is to design an appropriate fitness function of GA by means of integrating between-class variance and inter-class variance with all these three data sources to determine optimal thresholds. In accuracy assessments by comparing with ground truth—Landsat 8 OLI images, this new method has been validated and results with OA (Overall Accuracy) ranging from 0.854 to 0.913 and Kappa ranging from 0.699 to 0.722 show that the GA-UCAT approach is capable of describing spatial distributions and giving detailed information of urban extents. Additionally, there is discussion on different classifications of rural residential spots in Landsat remote sensing images and nighttime light (NTL) and evaluations of spatial-temporal development patterns of five selected Chinese urban clusters from 2012 to 2017 on utilizing this proposed method. The new method shows great potential to map global urban information in a simple and accurate way and to help address urban environmental issues.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2340
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Tilottama, G., Sutton, P. C., & Elvidge, C. D.
Title Informal Economy and Remittance Estimates of India Using Nighttime Imagery Type Journal Article
Year 2010 Publication International Journal of Ecological Economics & Statistics Abbreviated Journal
Volume 17 Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics
Abstract (up) Accurate estimates of the magnitude and spatial distribution of both formal and informal economic activity have many useful applications. Developing alternative methods for making estimates of these economic activities may prove to be useful when other measures are of suspect accuracy or unavailable. This research explores the potential for estimating the formal and informal economy for India using known relationships between the spatial patterns of nighttime satellite imagery and economic activity in the United States (U.S.). Regression models have been developed between spatial patterns of nighttime imagery and Adjusted Official Gross State Product (AGSP) for the states of the U.S. The slope and intercept parameters derived from the regression models of the U.S. were blindly applied to India, resulting in an underestimation of Gross State Income (GSI) for each state and Union Territory (UT) of India because of the lower level of urbanization in India in comparison to the U.S. However, a comparison of estimated GSI from the nighttime lights image and the official Gross State Product (GSP) of the states and UTs of India indicates a high correlation between them (r = 0.93). The different levels of urbanization (i.e. percent of population in urban areas) in the U.S. and India are used to adjust the Estimated Gross Domestic Income (EGDI) by multiplying by the ratio of the percentage of the population in urban areas for the two countries. This gives the Adjusted Estimated Gross Domestic Income of India (AEGDI), which is compared with the official Gross National Income (GNI) estimates of India’s states and UTs. The results suggest that the magnitude of India’s informal economy and the inflow of remittances are 150 percent larger than their existing official estimates in the GNI.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2554
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chen, X.; Jia, X.; Pickering, M.
Title A Nighttime Lights Adjusted Impervious Surface Index (NAISI) with Integration of Landsat Imagery and Nighttime Lights Data from International Space Station Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation Abbreviated Journal International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation
Volume 83 Issue Pages 101889
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Accurate mapping of impervious surface is essential for both urbanization monitoring and micro-ecosystem research. However, the confusion between impervious surface and bare soil is the major concern due to their high spectral similarity in optical imagery. Integration of multi-sensor images is considered to offer a better capacity for distinguishing impervious surface from background. In this paper, a new impervious surface index namely nighttime light adjusted impervious surface index (NAISI), which integrates information from Landsat and nighttime lights (NTL) data from International Space Station (NTL-ISS), is proposed. Parallel to baseline subtraction approaches, NAISI integrate the information from the first component of principal component (PC) transformation of NTL-ISS, the Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI) and the third component of tasseled cap transform (TC3) of the Landsat data. Visual interpretation and quantitative indices (SDI, Kappa and overall accuracy) were adopted to elevate the accuracy and separability of NAISI. Comparative analysis with NTL derived light intensity, optical indices, as well as existing optical-NTL indices were conducted to examine the performance of NAISI. Results indicate that NAISI achieves a more promising capability in impervious surface mapping. This demonstrates the superiority of integration of optical and nighttime lights information for imperviousness detection.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0303-2434 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2658
Permanent link to this record