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Author Yun, Hee-Kyung; Choi, Tae-Bong; Kim, Bu-Kyung; Kim, Hoon 윤희경; 최태봉; 김부경; 김훈
Title Study on the Standard Guideline of Environmental Impact Assessment Focusing on Light Pollution 빛공해 분야의 환경영향평가 지침 표준화 연구 Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Environmental Impact Assessment (환경영향평가) Abbreviated Journal
Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 63-70
Keywords Planning
Abstract (up) Artificial lighting is an essential part, but it causes light pollution due to unnecessary or excessive use of light. Light pollution has negative effects such as power waste, adverse health effects, destruction of the ecosystem. But currently, light pollution is managed only post-management. The purpose of this study is to standardize methods of environmental impact assessment focusing on light pollution to effectively manage and reduce the negative effect of areas that may cause light pollution in advance.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Korean Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2632
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Author Rodriguez, A.; Holmes, N.D.; Ryan, P.G.; Wilson, K.-J.; Faulquier, L.; Murillo, Y.; Raine, A.F.; Penniman, J.; Neves, V.; Rodriguez, B.; Negro, J.J.; Chiaradia, A.; Dann, P.; Anderson, T.; Metzger, B.; Shirai, M.; Deppe, L.; Wheeler, J.; Hodum, P.; Gouveia, C.; Carmo, V.; Carreira, G.P.; Delgado-Alburqueque, L.; Guerra-Correa, C.; Couzi, F.-X.; Travers, M.; Le Corre, M.
Title A global review of seabird mortality caused by land-based artificial lights Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol
Volume 31 Issue 5 Pages 986-1001
Keywords Animals; Ecology
Abstract (up) Artificial lights at night cause high mortality of seabirds, one of the most endangered groups of birds globally. Fledglings of burrow-nesting seabirds, and to a lesser extent adults, are grounded by lights when they fly at night. We review the current state of knowledge of light attraction, identify information gaps and propose measures to address the problem. Although other avian families such as Alcidae and Anatidae can be involved, the most affected seabirds are petrels and shearwaters: at least 56 species, more than one-third of them (24) threatened, are grounded by lights. Grounded seabirds have been found worldwide, mainly on oceanic islands but also at some continental locations. Petrel breeding grounds confined to formerly uninhabited islands are particularly at risk from ever-growing levels of light pollution due to tourism and urban sprawl. Where it is impractical to ban external lights, rescue programs of grounded birds offer the most immediate and extended mitigation measures to reduce light-induced mortality, saving thousands of birds every year. These programs also provide useful information for seabird management. However, the data typically are fragmentary and often strongly biased so the phenomenon is poorly understood, leading to inaccurate impact estimates. We identified as the most urgent priority actions: 1) estimation of mortality and impact on populations; 2) assessment of threshold light levels and safe distances from light sources; 3) documenting the fate of rescued birds; 4) improvement of rescue campaigns, particularly in terms of increasing recovery rates and level of care; and 5) research on seabird-friendly lights to reduce attraction. More research is necessary to improve our understanding of this human-wildlife conflict and to design effective management and mitigation measures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Address UMR ENTROPIE, Universite de la Reunion 15, avenue Rene Cassin – CS 92003 97744 Saint Denis Cedex 9, La Reunion, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:28151557 Approved no
Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1632
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Author Bailey, L.A.; Brigham, R.M.; Bohn, S.J.; Boyles, J.G.; Smit, B.
Title An experimental test of the allotonic frequency hypothesis to isolate the effects of light pollution on bat prey selection Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Oecologia Abbreviated Journal Oecologia
Volume 190 Issue 2 Pages 367–374
Keywords Animals; Ecology; bats; moths; insects; mammals
Abstract (up) Artificial lights may be altering interactions between bats and moth prey. According to the allotonic frequency hypothesis (AFH), eared moths are generally unavailable as prey for syntonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies between 20 and 50 kHz within the hearing range of eared moths) due to the moths' ability to detect syntonic bat echolocation. Syntonic bats therefore feed mainly on beetles, flies, true bugs, and non-eared moths. The AFH is expected to be violated around lights where eared moths are susceptible to exploitation by syntonic bats because moths' evasive strategies become less effective. The hypothesis has been tested to date almost exclusively in areas with permanent lighting, where the effects of lights on bat diets are confounded with other aspects of human habitat alteration. We undertook diet analysis in areas with short-term, localized artificial lighting to isolate the effects of artificial lighting and determine if syntonic and allotonic bats (i.e., bats that use echolocation frequencies outside the hearing range of eared moths) consumed more moths under conditions of artificial lights than in natural darkness. We found that syntonic bats increased their consumption of moth prey under experimentally lit conditions, likely owing to a reduction in the ability of eared moths to evade the bats. Eared moths may increase in diets of generalist syntonic bats foraging around artificial light sources, as opposed to allotonic species and syntonic species with a more specialized diet.
Address Department of Zoology and Entomology, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown, 6140, South Africa. b.smit@ru.ac.za
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31139944 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2511
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Author Lawrence, B.K.; Fehr, W.R.
Title Reproductive Response of Soybeans to Night Interruption1 Type Journal Article
Year 1981 Publication Crop Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume 21 Issue 5 Pages 755
Keywords Plants
Abstract (up) Artificial lights may be used to delay flowering of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] cultivars. Previous research has suggested that night interruption imposed every other night would delay flowering as much as every-night interruption. Our objective was to evaluate the reproductive development of cultivars when exposed to night interruption every night compared with exposure every other night. One cultivar of each Maturity Group 00 through V was grown in the field at Ames, Iowa during 1978 and 1979. The four light treatments imposed every night or every other night included illumination with incandescent light from sunset to sunrise, 2300 to 0030 hours, 0030 to 0200 hours, or 0200 to 0330 hours. Control plots were not exposed to artificial light.

The average number of days that reproductive development was delayed beyond the control was twice as great for the every-night treatments as for the every-other-night treatments. Illumination from sunset to sunrise delayed reproductive development significantly more than the treatments of night interruption for 1.5 hours. Night interruption near the end of the dark period (0200 to 0330 hours) delayed reproductive development more than the earlier interruptions.

The results did not support the hypothesis that light treatments every other night would delay reproductive development as much as every-night interruptions. The lighting regime needed to delay reproductive development will depend on the photoperiod requirements of the cultivars and duration of the delay that is desired.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0011-183X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2367
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Author Xie, Y.; Weng, Q.; Fu, P.
Title Temporal variations of artificial nighttime lights and their implications for urbanization in the conterminous United States, 2013–2017 Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment
Volume 225 Issue Pages 160-174
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) Artificial nighttime lights (NTL) generated by human activities offer a unique opportunity to understand urban environments. Although previous studies have widely used NTL images to map urban extent at multiple scales, it remains a challenging task to address how NTL respond exactly to urbanization and thus to map urbanization from NTL. In this study, using monthly Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP/VIIRS) NTL images between 2013 and 2017, we developed a method to decompose time-series NTL signal into annual and seasonal components. Further, we proposed an NTL-based indicator for the detection of impervious surfaces change (ISC) by integrating annual increment and seasonal variation of NTL brightness. The indicator was then used to identify ISC by using a thresholding method. The application of the methodology in the conterminous United States (CONUS) revealed a more rapid urbanization in the southern CONUS than the northern states and a northeastern-southwestern gradient of NTL seasonality. It was also found that NTL of November and December provided the most accurate characterization of urban extent for most areas in the CONUS. The detection of ISC in four representative regions (i.e. Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, greater Washington D.C., Denver-Aurora, and Atlanta) resulted in a moderate to high accuracy with the overall accuracy of ~80% and the Kappa value ranging from 0.56 to 0.73. Despite of this, the results showed a low accuracy of NTL-derived changing year of ISC (Kappa: 0.28) because of the existence of temporal inconsistency between NTL increase and ISC. The proposed method has the potential to timely map urban expansion at large geographical scales (e.g., continental and global) in a cost-efficient manner.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2336
Permanent link to this record