|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Do, Q.-T.; Shapiro, J.N.; Elvidge, C.D.; Abdel-Jelil, M.; Ahn, D.P.; Baugh, K.; Hansen-Lewis, J.; Zhizhin, M.; Bazilian, M.D.
Title Terrorism, geopolitics, and oil security: Using remote sensing to estimate oil production of the Islamic State Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Energy Research & Social Science Abbreviated Journal Energy Research & Social Science
Volume 44 Issue Pages 411-418
Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics
Abstract (up) As the world’s most traded commodity, oil production is typically well monitored and analyzed. It also has established links to geopolitics, international relations, and security. Despite this attention, the illicit production, refining, and trade of oil and derivative products occur all over the world and provide significant revenues outside of the oversight and regulation of governments. A prominent manifestation of this phenomenon is how terrorist and insurgent organizations—including the Islamic State group, also known as ISIL/ISIS or Daesh—use oil as a revenue source. Understanding the spatial and temporal variation in production can help determine the scale of operations, technical capacity, and revenue streams. This information, in turn, can inform both security and reconstruction strategies. To this end, we use satellite multi-spectral imaging and ground-truth pre-war output data to effectively construct a real-time census of oil production in areas controlled by the ISIL terrorist group. More broadly, remotely measuring the activity of extractive industries in conflict-affected areas without reliable administrative data can support a broad range of public policy and decisions and military operations.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2214-6296 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1864
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Spitschan, M.; Cajochen, C.
Title Binocular facilitation in light-mediated melatonin suppression? Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Journal of Pineal Research Abbreviated Journal J Pineal Res
Volume 67 Issue 4 Pages e12602
Keywords Human Health; Vision; melatonin suppression; monocular; binocular
Abstract (up) Astronomers and pilots have known for a long time that closing one eye can preserve vision in that eye while going from dark to light and back. Recently, it was reported that viewing a smartphone monocularly in an otherwise dark room can lead to transient, but strong reductions in retinal sensitivity in that eye (Alim-Marvasti, Bi, Mahroo, Barbur, & Plant, 2016). But seeing detail is not the only function that is mediated by the retina. Here, we address the question whether light exposure to one eye only (monocular) has tangible effects on the suppression of melatonin by light, relative to both eyes open (binocular).
Address Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-3098 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31361918 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2595
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Miller, M.W.
Title Apparent Effects of Light Pollution on Singing Behavior of American Robins Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication The Condor Abbreviated Journal Condor
Volume 108 Issue 1 Pages 130
Keywords American Robin; birds; light pollution; morning chorus; dawn chorus; song; Turdus migratorius; animals; communication
Abstract (up) Astronomers consider light pollution to be a growing problem, however few studies have addressed potential effects of light pollution on wildlife. Sunlight is believed to initiate song in many bird species. If light initiates song, then light pollution may be influencing avian song behavior at a population level. This hypothesis predicts that birds breeding in areas with large amounts of artificial light will begin singing earlier in the day than birds in areas with little artificial light. Birds in highly illuminated areas might begin singing earlier than did birds in those same areas in previous years when artificial light levels were known to be, or were presumably, lower. Also, birds should begin singing earlier within a site on brightly lit nights. In 2002 and 2003 I documented initiation of morning song by breeding American Robins (Turdus migratorius) in areas with differing intensity of artificial nocturnal light. I compared my observations among sites and against historical studies. Robin populations in areas with large amounts of artificial light frequently began their morning chorus during true night. Chorus initiation time, relative to civil twilight, was positively correlated with amount of artificial light present during true night. Robin choruses in areas with little, or presumably little, artificial light have almost never begun during true night, instead appearing to track the onset of civil twilight. Proliferation of artificial nocturnal light may be strongly affecting singing behavior of American Robins at a population level.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0010-5422 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 39
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Collison, F.M.; Poe, K.
Title “Astronomical Tourism”: The Astronomy and Dark Sky Program at Bryce Canyon National Park Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Tourism Management Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Tourism Management Perspectives
Volume 7 Issue Pages 1-15
Keywords Astronomy-related tourism; National parks; Night sky darkness; astrotourism; dark skies
Abstract (up) Astronomical tourism represents a less-studied segment of sustainable tourism, where a dark night sky is the underlying resource. This article evaluates an astronomical tourism program, in this case at a national park with dark skies for observing. Bryce Canyon National Park (BCNP) in the southwestern United States has a well-developed astronomy program to serve visitors. The program consists of solar viewing during the day, multimedia evening programs, and night-time star gazing with telescopes. Depending on the specific measure used, it appears that up to 10% of park visitors may be involved with the formal Astronomy and Dark Sky Program and/or more informal astronomy activities. BCNP appears well positioned to take advantage of the dark sky attributes of the park and to educate visitors about the importance of maintaining and/or increasing the darkness of night skies. Potential future developments in the program may serve to further increase the number of visitors to BCNP.
Address School of Travel Industry Management, 1901 Ruby Lane, Liberty, MO 64068; collison(at)hawaii.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211-9736 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 128
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Roach, F.E.; Gordon, J.L.
Title The Light of the Night Sky Type Book Whole
Year 1973 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Natural Sky Brightness; Airglow
Abstract (up) Astronomy appears to us as a combination of art, science, and philosophy. Its study puts the universe into perspective, giving a sense of pleasure in its beauty, awe at its immensity, and humility at our trivial place in it. From earliest human history, man has scrutinized the night sky – and wondered and marveled. With unaided eye but perceptive mind, he recognized order in the regular appearance and movements of individual objects, such as the planets and star groups (constellations), in their rhythmic and majestic progressions across the bowl of night. Even in the present era of scientific exactitude, there remains a profound awareness of mysteries beyond our present interpretations. It is only in comparatively recent years, however, that man has recognized that it takes more than conventional astronomy to account for the beauties ofthe night sky. Radiations in the Earth's upper atmosphere provide a foreground light, the study of which has come under a new name, aeronomy. The science of aeronomy has rapidly burgeoned, and the student of the light of the night sky finds that he is involved in an interdisciplinary domain. The 'meat' of one discipline, however, may be the 'poison' of the other. To the astronomer, the Earth's atmosphere, inhibiting his extra-terrestrial viewing, is a serious nuisance. To the aeronomer, the Moon, planets, stars, and Galaxies hamper his measurements and interfere with his studies of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Yet both sets of elements are basic to the beauties as well as to the understanding of the light of the night sky. It is essentially the students of astronomy and aeronomy for whom we have written this book. We also hope, however, that it will present much of interest and value to the bemused sky watcher, for whom some detailed knowledge of the several con-tried to meld these dual objectives to create a broadly based, professionally valid tributors to the nighttinie sky may increase his pleasure in contemplating it. We have treatise that will lead the serious student to deeper probing into the phenomena and will inspire both him and the enthusiastic amateur to an appreciation of that half of their experience which we may refer to as their 'night life'.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Reidel Publishing Company Place of Publication Dordrecht, Holland Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3125
Permanent link to this record