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Author Panagiotou, M.; Rohling, J.H.T.; Deboer, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Sleep Network Deterioration as a Function of Dim-Light-At-Night Exposure Duration in a Mouse Model Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep  
  Volume 2 Issue 3 Pages 308-324  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) Artificial light, despite its widespread and valuable use, has been associated withdeterioration of health and well-being, including altered circadian timing and sleep disturbances,particularly in nocturnal exposure. Recent findings from our lab reveal significant sleep andsleep electroencephalogram (EEG) changes owing to three months exposure to dim-light-at-night(DLAN). Aiming to further explore the detrimental effects of DLAN exposure, in the present study,we continuously recorded sleep EEG and the electromyogram for baseline 24-h and following 6-h sleepdeprivation in a varied DLAN duration scheme. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to a 12:12 h light:DLANcycle (75lux:5lux) vs. a 12:12 h light:dark cycle (75lux:0lux) for one day, one week, and one month.Our results show that sleep was already affected by a mere day of DLAN exposure with additionalcomplications emerging with increasing DLAN exposure duration, such as the gradual delay ofthe daily 24-h vigilance state rhythms. We conducted detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) on thelocomotor activity data following 1-month and 3-month DLAN exposure, and a significantly lesshealthy rest-activity pattern, based on the decreased alpha values, was found in both conditionscompared to the control light-dark. Taking into account the behavioral, sleep and the sleep EEGparameters, our data suggest that DLAN exposure, even in the shortest duration, induces deleteriouseffects; nevertheless, potential compensatory mechanisms render the organism partly adjustable andable to cope. We think that, for this reason, our data do not always depict linear divergence amonggroups, as compared with control conditions. Chronic DLAN exposure impacts the sleep regulatorysystem, but also brain integrity, diminishing its adaptability and reactivity, especially apparent in thesleep EEG alterations and particular low alpha values following DFA.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3078  
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Author Russo, D.; Cosentino, F.; Festa, F.; De Benedetta, F.; Pejic, B.; Cerretti, P.; Ancillotto, L. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial illumination near rivers may alter bat-insect trophic interactions Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) Abbreviated Journal Environ Pollut  
  Volume 252 Issue Pt B Pages 1671-1677  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) Artificial illumination at night represents an increasingly concerning threat to ecosystems worldwide, altering persistence, behaviour, physiology and fitness of many organisms and their mutual interactions, in the long-term affecting ecosystem functioning. Bats are very sensitive to artificial light at night because they are obligate nocturnal and feed on insects which are often also responsive to lights. Here we tested the effects of LED lighting on prey-predator interactions at riverine ecosystems, using bats and their insect prey as models, and compared bat and insect reactions in terms of bat activity and prey insect abundance and diversity, respectively, on artificially lit vs. unlit nights. Artificial light influenced both insect and bat assemblages in taxon-specific directions: insect abundances increased at lit sites, particularly due to an increase in small dipterans near the light source. Composition of insect assemblages also differed significantly between lit and unlit sites. Total bat activity declined at lit sites, but this change was mainly due to the response of the most abundant species, Myotis daubentonii, while opportunistic species showed no reaction or even an opposite pattern (Pipistrellus kuhlii). We show that artificial lighting along rivers may affect trophic interactions between bats and insects, resulting in a profound alteration of community structure and dynamics.  
  Address Wildlife Research Unit, Dipartimento di Agraria, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, via Universita, 100, 80055, Portici, Italy  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31284209 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2572  
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Author Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Make lighting healthier Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal Nature  
  Volume 553 Issue 7688 Pages 274-276  
  Keywords Commentary; Lighting; Human Health  
  Abstract (up) Artificial illumination can stop us sleeping and make us ill. We need fresh strategies and technologies, argues Karolina M. Zielinska-Dabkowska.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0028-0836 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2932  
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Author van Grunsven, R.H.A.; Jahnichen, D.; Grubisic, M.; Hölker, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Slugs (Arionidae) benefit from nocturnal artificial illumination Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 429-433  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract (up) Artificial illumination increases around the globe and this has been found to affect many groups of organisms and ecosystems. By manipulating nocturnal illumination using one large experimental field site with 24 streetlights and one dark control, we assessed the impact of artificial illumination on slugs over a period of 4 years. The number of slugs, primarily Arionidae, increased strongly in the illuminated site but not on the dark site. There are several nonexclusive explanations for this effect, including reduced predation and increased food quality in the form of carcasses of insects attracted by the light. As slugs play an important role in ecosystems and are also important pest species, the increase of slugs under artificial illumination cannot only affect ecosystem functioning but also have important economic consequences.  
  Address Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB), Berlin, Germany  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29761669 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1913  
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Author Gong, P.; Li, X.; Wang, J.; Bai, Y.; Chen, B.; Hu, T.; Liu, X.; Xu, B.; Yang, J.; Zhang, W.; Zhou, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Annual maps of global artificial impervious area (GAIA) between 1985 and 2018 Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 236 Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract (up) Artificial impervious areas are predominant indicators of human settlements. Timely, accurate, and frequent information on artificial impervious areas is critical to understanding the process of urbanization and land use/cover change, as well as of their impacts on the environment and biodiversity. Despite their importance, there still lack annual maps of high-resolution Global Artificial Impervious Areas (GAIA) with longer than 30-year records, due to the high demand of high performance computation and the lack of effective mapping algorithms. In this paper, we mapped annual GAIA from 1985 to 2018 using the full archive of 30-m resolution Landsat images on the Google Earth Engine platform. With ancillary datasets, including the nighttime light data and the Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar data, we improved the performance of our previously developed algorithm in arid areas. We evaluated the GAIA data for 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015, and the mean overall accuracy is higher than 90%. A cross-product comparison indicates the GAIA data are the only dataset spanning over 30 years. The temporal trend in GAIA agrees well with other datasets at the local, regional, and global scales. Our results indicate that the GAIA reached 797,076 km2 in 2018, which is 1.5 times more than that in 1990. China and the United States (US) rank among the top two in artificial impervious area, accounting for approximately 50% of the world's total in 2018. The artificial impervious area of China surpassed that of the US in 2015. By 2018, the remaining eight among the top ten countries are India, Russia, Brazil, France, Italy, Germany, Japan, and Canada. The GAIA dataset can be freely downloaded from http://data.ess.tsinghua.edu.cn.  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2756  
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