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Author Korompeli, A.; Kavrochorianou, N.; Molcan, L.; Muurlink, O.; Boutzouka, E.; Myrianthefs, P.; Fildissis, G.
Title Light affects heart rate's 24-h rhythmicity in intensive care unit patients: an observational study Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Nursing in Critical Care Abbreviated Journal Nurs Crit Care
Volume 24 Issue 5 Pages 320-325
Keywords Lighting; Human Health; Heart Rate; ICU; Circadian Rhythm
Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Intensive care unit (ICU) patients experience two affronts to normal 24-h rhythms: largely internal events such as medication and external factors such as light, noise and nursing interventions. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: We investigated the impact of light variance within an ICU on 24-h rhythmicity of three key physiological parameters: heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and body temperature (BT) in this patient population. DESIGN: Patients were assigned to beds either in the 'light' or 'dark' side within a single ICU. An actigraph continuously recorded light intensity for a 24-72-h period. METHODS: Measurements of HR, MAP and BT were recorded every 30 min. RESULTS: HR, MAP and BT did not follow 24-h rhythmicity in all patients. Higher light exposure in the Light Side of the ICU (122.3 versus 50.6 lx) was related to higher HR (89.4 versus 79.8 bpm), which may translate to clinically relevant outcomes in a larger sample. Duration of stay, the one clinical outcome measured in this study, showed no significant variation between the groups (p = 0.147). CONCLUSIONS: ICU patients are exposed to varying light intensities depending on bed positioning relative to natural sunlight, affecting the 24-h rhythm of HR. Larger, well-controlled studies also investigating the effect of relevant light intensity are indicated. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Light is a variable that can be manipulated in the constrained environment of an ICU, thus offering an avenue for relatively unobtrusive interventions.
Address National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, University ICU, Ag. Anargyroi General Hospital, Athens, Greece
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1362-1017 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31087602 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2502
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Author Mortazavi, S.A.R., Parhoodeh, S., Hosseini, M.A., Arabi, H., Malakooti, H., Nematollahi, S., Mortazavi, G., Darvish, L., Mortazavi, S.M.J.
Title Blocking Short-Wavelength Component of the Visible Light Emitted by Smartphones’ Screens Improves Human Sleep Quality Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biomedical Physics and Engineering Abbreviated Journal
Volume 8 Issue 4 Pages 375-380
Keywords Human Health
Abstract (up) Background: It has been shown that short-wavelength blue component of the visible light spectrum can alter the circadian rhythm and suppress the level of melatonin hormone. The short-wavelength light emitted by smartphones’ screens can affect the sleep quality of the people who use these devices at night through suppression of melatonin.

Objectives: In this study, we examined the effects of covering the screens of smartphones with different filters (changing the effective wavelength of the light) on sleep delay time in 43 healthy students.

Materials and Methods: Volunteer students were asked to go to bed at 23:00 and to use their mobile phones in bed for watching a natural life documentary movie for 60 minutes. No filter was used for one night while amber and blue filters were used for other 2 nights. Photospectrometry method was used to determine the output spectrum of the light passing through the filters used for covering the screens of the mobile phones. The order for utilizing amber or blue filters or using no filter was selected randomly. After 1 hour, the participants were asked to record their sleep delay time measured by a modified form of sleep time record sheet.

Results: The mean sleep delay time for the “no-filter” night was 20.84±9.15 minutes, while the sleep delay times for the nights with amber and blue filters were 15.26±1.04 and 26.33±1.59 minutes, respectively.

Conclusion: The findings obtained in this study support this hypothesis that blue light possibly suppresses the secretion of melatonin more than the longer wavelengths of the visible light spectrum. Using amber filter in this study significantly improved the sleep quality. Altogether, these findings lead us to this conclusion that blocking the short-wavelength component of the light emitted by smartphones’ screens improves human sleep.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2077
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Author Breitler, J.-C.; Djerrab, D.; Leran, S.; Toniutti, L.; Guittin, C.; Severac, D.; Pratlong, M.; Dereeper, A.; Etienne, H.; Bertrand, B.
Title Full moonlight-induced circadian clock entrainment in Coffea arabica Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication BMC Plant Biology Abbreviated Journal BMC Plant Biol
Volume 20 Issue 1 Pages 24
Keywords Moonlight; Plants
Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: It is now well documented that moonlight affects the life cycle of invertebrates, birds, reptiles, and mammals. The lunisolar tide is also well-known to alter plant growth and development. However, although plants are known to be very photosensitive, few studies have been undertaken to explore the effect of moonlight on plant physiology. RESULTS: Here for the first time we report a massive transcriptional modification in Coffea arabica genes under full moonlight conditions, particularly at full moon zenith and 3 h later. Among the 3387 deregulated genes found in our study, the main core clock genes were affected. CONCLUSIONS: Moonlight also negatively influenced many genes involved in photosynthesis, chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast machinery at the end of the night, suggesting that the full moon has a negative effect on primary photosynthetic machinery at dawn. Moreover, full moonlight promotes the transcription of major rhythmic redox genes and many heat shock proteins, suggesting that moonlight is perceived as stress. We confirmed this huge impact of weak light (less than 6 lx) on the transcription of circadian clock genes in controlled conditions mimicking full moonlight.
Address UMR IPME, Univ. Montpellier, CIRAD, IRD, F-34394, Montpellier, France
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1471-2229 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31941456 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2817
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Author Lee, S.; Kakitsuba, N.; Katsuura, T.
Title Do green-blocking glasses enhance the nonvisual effects of white polychromatic light? Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Physiological Anthropology Abbreviated Journal J Physiol Anthropol
Volume 37 Issue 1 Pages 29
Keywords Human Health; Vision
Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: It is well known that light containing the blue component stimulates the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and plays a role in melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction. In our previous studies, we verified that simultaneous exposure to blue and green light resulted in less pupillary constriction than blue light exposure. Hence, we hypothesized that the nonvisual effects of polychromatic white light might be increased by blocking the green component. Therefore, we conducted an experiment using optical filters that blocked blue or green component and examined the nonvisual effects of these lights on pupillary constriction and electroencephalogram power spectra. METHODS: Ten healthy young males participated in this study. The participant sat on a chair with his eyes facing an integrating sphere. After 10 min of light adaptation, the participant's left eye was exposed to white pulsed light (1000 lx; pulse width 2.5 ms) every 10 s with a blue-blocking glasses, a green-blocking glasses, or control glasses (no lens), and pupillary constriction was measured. Then, after rest for 10 min, the participant was exposed a continuous white light of 1000 lx with a blue- or green-blocking glasses or control glasses and electroencephalogram was measured. RESULTS: Pupillary constriction with the blue-blocking glasses was significantly less than that observed with the green-blocking glasses. Furthermore, pupillary constriction under the green-blocking glasses was significantly greater than that observed with the control glasses. CONCLUSIONS: A reduction in the green component of light facilitated pupillary constriction. Thus, the effects of polychromatic white light containing blue and green components on ipRGCs are apparently increased by removing the green component.
Address Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1880-6791 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30563575; PMCID:PMC6299521 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2153
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Author Garcia-Saenz, A.; Sanchez de Miguel, A.; Espinosa, A.; Costas, L.; Aragones, N.; Tonne, C.; Moreno, V.; Perez-Gomez, B.; Valentin, A.; Pollan, M.; Castano-Vinyal, G.; Aube, M.; Kogevinas, M.
Title Association between outdoor light-at-night exposure and colorectal cancer in Spain (MCC-Spain study) Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) Abbreviated Journal Epidemiology
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Human Health; Remote Sensing
Abstract (up) BACKGROUND: Night shift work, exposure to artificial light-at-night and particularly blue light spectrum, and the consequent circadian disruption may increase the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Colorectal cancer risk may also be increased among night-shift workers. We investigated the association between exposure to artificial light at night according to light spectrum and colorectal cancer among subjects who had never worked at night in a general population case-control study in Spain. METHODS: We examined information on 661 incident histologically verified colorectal cancer cases and 1322 controls from Barcelona and Madrid, 2007-2013. Outdoor artificial light at night exposure was based on images from the International Space Station (ISS) including data on remotely sensed upward light intensity. We derived adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimates and confidence intervals (CI) for visual light, blue light, and spectral sensitivities of the five human photopigments assigned to participant's geocoded longest residence. RESULTS: : Exposure to blue light spectrum was positively associated with colorectal cancer (OR=1.6; 95%CI: 1.2-2.2; highest vs. lowest tertile). ORs were similar (OR=1.7; 95%CI: 1.3-2.3) when further adjusting for area socioeconomic status, diet patterns, smoking, sleep and family history. We observed no association for outdoor visual light (full spectrum) (OR = 1.0, 95%CI 0.7-1.2; highest vs. lowest tertile). Analysis of the five photopigments gave similar results with increased risks for shorter wavelengths overlapping with the blue spectrum and no association for longer wavelengths. CONCLUSIONS: Outdoor blue light spectrum exposure that is increasingly prevalent in recent years may be associated with colorectal cancer risk.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1044-3983 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32639250 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3043
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