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Author Amichai, E.; Kronfeld-Schor, N.
Title Artificial Light at Night Promotes Activity Throughout the Night in Nesting Common Swifts (Apus apus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 11052
Keywords Animals
Abstract The use of artificial light at night (ALAN) is a rapidly expanding anthropogenic effect that transforms nightscapes throughout the world, causing light pollution that affects ecosystems in a myriad of ways. One of these is changing or shifting activity rhythms, largely synchronized by light cues. We used acoustic loggers to record and quantify activity patterns during the night of a diurnal bird – the common swift – in a nesting colony exposed to extremely intensive artificial illumination throughout the night at Jerusalem's Western Wall. We compared that to activity patterns at three other colonies exposed to none, medium, or medium-high ALAN. We found that in the lower-intensity ALAN colonies swifts ceased activity around sunset, later the more intense the lighting. At the Western Wall, however, swifts remained active throughout the night. This may have important implications for the birds' physiology, breeding cycle, and fitness, and may have cascading effects on their ecosystems.
Address (down) School of Zoology, Faculty of Life Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31363144 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2594
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Author Collison, F.M.; Poe, K.
Title “Astronomical Tourism”: The Astronomy and Dark Sky Program at Bryce Canyon National Park Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Tourism Management Perspectives Abbreviated Journal Tourism Management Perspectives
Volume 7 Issue Pages 1-15
Keywords Astronomy-related tourism; National parks; Night sky darkness; astrotourism; dark skies
Abstract Astronomical tourism represents a less-studied segment of sustainable tourism, where a dark night sky is the underlying resource. This article evaluates an astronomical tourism program, in this case at a national park with dark skies for observing. Bryce Canyon National Park (BCNP) in the southwestern United States has a well-developed astronomy program to serve visitors. The program consists of solar viewing during the day, multimedia evening programs, and night-time star gazing with telescopes. Depending on the specific measure used, it appears that up to 10% of park visitors may be involved with the formal Astronomy and Dark Sky Program and/or more informal astronomy activities. BCNP appears well positioned to take advantage of the dark sky attributes of the park and to educate visitors about the importance of maintaining and/or increasing the darkness of night skies. Potential future developments in the program may serve to further increase the number of visitors to BCNP.
Address (down) School of Travel Industry Management, 1901 Ruby Lane, Liberty, MO 64068; collison(at)hawaii.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2211-9736 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 128
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Author Zhang, K.; Zhong, X.; Zhang, G.; Li, D.; Su, Z.; Meng, Y.; Jiang, Y.
Title Thermal Stability Optimization of the Luojia 1-01 Nighttime Light Remote-Sensing Camera's Principal Distance Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 19 Issue 5 Pages 990
Keywords Instrumentation; Luojia 1-01; nighttime light remote-sensing camera; principal distance; optical-passive athermal design; thermal stability
Abstract The instability of the principal distance of the nighttime light remote-sensing camera of the Luojia 1-01 satellite directly affects the geometric accuracy of images, consequently affecting the results of analysis of nighttime light remote-sensing data. Based on the theory of optical passive athermal design, a mathematical model of optical-passive athermal design for principal distance stabilization is established. Positive and negative lenses of different materials and the mechanical structures of different materials are matched to optimize the optical system. According to the index requirements of the Luojia 1-01 camera, an image-telecentric optical system was designed under the guidance of the established mathematical model. In the temperature range of -20 degrees C to +60 degrees C, the principal distance of the system changes from -0.01 mum to +0.28 mum. After on-orbit testing, the geometric accuracy of the designed nighttime light remote-sensing camera is better than 0.20 pixels and less than index requirement of 0.3 pixels, which indicating that the principal distance maintains good stability on-orbit and meets the application requirements of nighttime light remote sensing.
Address (down) School of Remote Sensing and Information Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China. jiangyh@whu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30813556 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2238
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Author Nehme, P.A.; Amaral, F.; Lowden, A.; Skene, D.J.; Cipolla-Neto, J.; Moreno, C.R.C.
Title Reduced melatonin synthesis in pregnant night workers: metabolic implications for offspring Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Medical Hypotheses Abbreviated Journal Medical Hypotheses
Volume 132 Issue Pages 109353
Keywords Human Health; Pregnancy; Melatonin; Melatonin synthesis; Circadian disruption; shift work
Abstract Several novel animal studies have shown that intrauterine metabolic programming can be modified in the event of reduced melatonin synthesis during pregnancy, leading to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in the offspring. It is therefore postulated that female night workers when pregnant may expose the offspring to unwanted health threats. This may be explained by the fact that melatonin is essential for regulating energy metabolism and can influence reproductive activity. Moreover, the circadian misalignment caused by shift work affects fertility and the fetus, increasing the risk of miscarriage, premature birth and low birth weight, phenomena observed in night workers. Thus, we hypothesize that light-induced melatonin suppression as a result of night work may alter intrauterine metabolic programming in pregnant women, potentially leading to metabolic disorders in their offspring.
Address (down) School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Elsevier Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language English Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0306-9877 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2610
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Author Phipps-Nelson, J.; Redman, J.R.; Schlangen, L.J.M.; Rajaratnam, S.M.W.
Title Blue light exposure reduces objective measures of sleepiness during prolonged nighttime performance testing Type Journal Article
Year 2009 Publication Chronobiology International Abbreviated Journal Chronobiol Int
Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 891-912
Keywords Human Health
Abstract This study examined the effects of nocturnal exposure to dim, narrowband blue light (460 nm, approximately 1 lux, 2 microW/cm2), compared to dim broad spectrum (white) ambient light ( approximately 0.2 lux, 0.5 microW/cm2), on subjective and objective indices of sleepiness during prolonged nighttime performance testing. Participants were also exposed to a red light (640 nm, approximately 1 lux, 0.7 microW/cm2) placebo condition. Outcome measures were driving simulator and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance, subjective sleepiness, salivary melatonin, and electroencephalographic (EEG) activity. The study had a repeated-measures design, with three counterbalanced light conditions and a four-week washout period between each condition. Participants (n = 8) maintained a regular sleep-wake schedule for 14 days prior to the approximately 14 h laboratory study, which consisted of habituation to light conditions followed by neurobehavioral performance testing from 21:00 to 08:30 h under modified constant-routine conditions. A neurobehavioral test battery (2.5 h) was presented four times between 21:00 and 08:30 h, with a 30 min break between each. From 23:30 to 05:30 h, participants were exposed to blue or red light, or remained in ambient conditions. Compared to ambient light exposure, blue light exposure suppressed EEG slow wave delta (1.0-4.5 Hz) and theta (4.5-8 Hz) activity and reduced the incidence of slow eye movements. PVT reaction times were significantly faster in the blue light condition, but driving simulator measures, subjective sleepiness, and salivary melatonin levels were not significantly affected by blue light. Red light exposure, as compared to ambient light exposure, reduced the incidence of slow eye movements. The results demonstrate that low-intensity, blue light exposure can promote alertness, as measured by some of the objective indices used in this study, during prolonged nighttime performance testing. Low intensity, blue light exposure has the potential to be applied to situations where it is desirable to increase alertness but not practical or appropriate to use bright light, such as certain occupational settings.
Address (down) School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0742-0528 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:19637049 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2202
Permanent link to this record