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Author Mortazavi, S.M.J.
Title Comment on 'Domestic light at night and breast cancer risk: a prospective analysis of 105 000 UK women in the Generations Study' Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication British Journal of Cancer Abbreviated Journal Br J Cancer
Volume 118 Issue 11 Pages 1536
Keywords Commentary
Abstract
Address (down) Ionizing and Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Research Center (INIRPRC), Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. S.M.Javad.Mortazavi@fccc.edu
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0007-0920 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:29769746 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1911
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Author Abay, K.A.; Amare, M.
Title Night light intensity and women's body weight: Evidence from Nigeria Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Economics and Human Biology Abbreviated Journal Econ Hum Biol
Volume 31 Issue Pages 238-248
Keywords Remote Sensing; Human Health; Adolescent; Adult; Body Mass Index; *Body Weight; Cross-Sectional Studies; Female; Health Surveys; Humans; Lighting/*statistics & numerical data; Middle Aged; Nigeria/epidemiology; Obesity/epidemiology; Overweight/*epidemiology; Prevalence; *Urbanization; Young Adult; *Bmi; *Nigeria; *Night light; *Obesity; *Overweight; *Urbanization
Abstract The prevalence of overweight and obesity are increasing in many African countries and hence becoming regional public health challenges. We employ satellite-based night light intensity data as a proxy for urbanization to investigate the relationship between urbanization and women's body weight. We use two rounds of the Demographic and Health Survey data from Nigeria. We employ both nonparametric and parametric estimation approaches that exploit both the cross-sectional and longitudinal variations in night light intensities. Our empirical analysis reveals nonlinear relationships between night light intensity and women's body weight measures. Doubling the sample's average level of night light intensity is associated with up to a ten percentage point increase in the probability of overweight. However, despite the generally positive relationship between night light intensity and women's body weight, the strength of the relationship varies across the assorted stages of night light intensity. Early stages of night light intensity are not significantly associated with women's body weight, while higher stages of nightlight intensities are associated with higher rates of overweight and obesity. Given that night lights are strong predictors of urbanization and related economic activities, our results hint at nonlinear relationships between various stages of urbanization and women's body weight.
Address (down) International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), USA. Electronic address: M.Amare@cgiar.org
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1570-677X ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30312904 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2714
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Author Gaston, M.S.; Pereyra, L.C.; Vaira, M.
Title Artificial light at night and captivity induces differential effects on leukocyte profile, body condition, and erythrocyte size of a diurnal toad Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals; Amphibians; Toads
Abstract Light pollution or artificial lighting at night (ALAN) is an emerging threat to biodiversity that can disrupt physiological processes and behaviors. Because ALAN stressful effects are little studied in diurnal amphibian species, we investigated if chronic ALAN exposure affects the leukocyte profile, body condition, and blood cell sizes of a diurnal toad. We hand-captured male toads of Melanophryniscus rubriventris in Angosto de Jaire (Jujuy, Argentina). We prepared blood smears from three groups of toads: “field” (toads processed in the field immediately after capture), “natural light” (toads kept in the laboratory under captivity with natural photoperiod), and “constant light” (toads kept in the laboratory under captivity with constant photoperiod/ALAN). We significantly observed higher neutrophil proportions and neutrophils to lymphocytes ratio in toads under constant light treatment. In addition, we observed significantly better body condition and higher erythrocyte size in field toads compared with captive toads. In summary, ALAN can trigger a leukocyte response to stress in males of the diurnal toad M. rubriventris. In addition, captivity can affect the body condition and erythrocyte size of these toads.
Address (down) Instituto de Ecorregiones Andinas (INECOA), Universidad Nacional de Jujuy, CONICET, San Salvador de Jujuy, Argentina
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30320969 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2049
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Author Flores, D.E.F.L.; Oda, G.A.
Title Novel Light/Dark Regimens with Minimum Light Promote Circadian Disruption: Simulations with a Model Oscillator Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Journal of Biological Rhythms Abbreviated Journal J Biol Rhythms
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial lab manipulation of LD cycles has enabled simulations of the disruptive conditions found in modern human societies, such as jet-lag, night-work and light at night. New techniques using animal models have been developed, and these can greatly improve our understanding of circadian disruption. Some of these techniques, such as in vivo bioluminescence assays, require minimum external light. This requirement is challenging because the usual lighting protocols applied in circadian desynchronization experiments rely on considerable light input. Here, we present a novel LD regimen that can disrupt circadian rhythms with little light per day, based on computer simulations of a model limit-cycle oscillator. The model predicts that a single light pulse per day has the potential to disturb rhythmicity when pulse times are randomly distributed within an interval. Counterintuitively, the rhythm still preserves an underlying 24-h periodicity when this interval is as large as 14 h, indicating that day/night cues are still detectable. Only when pulses are spread throughout the whole 24-h day does the rhythm lose any day-to-day period correlation. In addition, the model also reveals that stronger pulses of brighter light should exacerbate the disrupting effects. We propose the use of this LD schedule-which would be compatible with the requirements of in vivo bioluminescence assays-to help understand circadian disruption and associated illnesses.
Address (down) Instituto de Biociencias, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0748-7304 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30595077 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2146
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Author Zhang, Z.; Wang, H.-J.; Wang, D.-R.; Qu, W.-M.; Huang, Z.-L.
Title Red light at intensities above 10 lx alters sleep-wake behavior in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Light, Science & Applications Abbreviated Journal Light Sci Appl
Volume 6 Issue 5 Pages e16231
Keywords Animals
Abstract Sleep is regulated by two mechanisms: the homeostatic process and the circadian clock. Light affects sleep and alertness by entraining the circadian clock, and acutely inducing sleep/alertness, in a manner mediated by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Because intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are believed to be minimally sensitive to red light, which is widely used for illumination to reduce the photic disturbance to nocturnal animals during the dark phase. However, the appropriate intensity of the red light is unknown. In the present study, we recorded electroencephalograms and electromyograms of freely moving mice to investigate the effects of red light emitted by light-emitting diodes at different intensities and for different durations on the sleep-wake behavior of mice. White light was used as a control. Unexpectedly, red light exerted potent sleep-inducing effects and changed the sleep architecture in terms of the duration and number of sleep episodes, the stage transition, and the EEG power density when the intensity was >20 lx. Subsequently, we lowered the light intensity and demonstrated that red light at or below 10 lx did not affect sleep-wake behavior. White light markedly induced sleep and disrupted sleep architecture even at an intensity as low as 10 lx. Our findings highlight the importance of limiting the intensity of red light (10 lx) to avoid optical influence in nocturnal behavioral experiments, particularly in the field of sleep and circadian research.
Address (down) Institutes of Brain Science and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Clinical Geriatric Medicine, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2047-7538 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30167247; PMCID:PMC6062196 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2463
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