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Author Gonzalez, M.M.C.; Golombek, D.A.
Title Editorial: Let There Be Light: Biological Impact of Light Exposure in the Laboratory and the Clinic Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Frontiers in Neurology Abbreviated Journal Front Neurol
Volume 9 Issue Pages
Keywords Commentary; Animals
Abstract
Address (down) Department of Science and Technology, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Bernal, Argentina
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1664-2295 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30356725; PMCID:PMC6189324 Approved no
Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2072
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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Borniger, J.C.; Gaudier-Diaz, M.M.; Hecmarie Melendez-Fernandez, O.; Pascoe, J.L.; Courtney DeVries, A.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Acute exposure to low-level light at night is sufficient to induce neurological changes and depressive-like behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Molecular Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Mol Psychiatry
Volume Issue Pages s41380-019-0430-4
Keywords Human health; physiology; brain
Abstract The advent and wide-spread adoption of electric lighting over the past century has profoundly affected the circadian organization of physiology and behavior for many individuals in industrialized nations; electric lighting in homes, work environments, and public areas have extended daytime activities into the evening, thus, increasing night-time exposure to light. Although initially assumed to be innocuous, chronic exposure to light at night (LAN) is now associated with increased incidence of cancer, metabolic disorders, and affective problems in humans. However, little is known about potential acute effects of LAN. To determine whether acute exposure to low-level LAN alters brain function, adult male, and female mice were housed in either light days and dark nights (LD; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 0 lux) or light days and low level light at night (LAN; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 5 lux). Mice exposed to LAN on three consecutive nights increased depressive-like responses compared to mice housed in dark nights. In addition, female mice exposed to LAN increased central tendency in the open field. LAN was associated with reduced hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in both male and female mice, as well as increased VEGFR1 and interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in females, and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in males. Further, LAN significantly altered circadian rhythms (activity and temperature) and circadian gene expression in female and male mice, respectively. Altogether, this study demonstrates that acute exposure to LAN alters brain physiology and can be detrimental to well-being in otherwise healthy individuals.
Address (down) Department of Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Nature Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1359-4184 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31138889 Approved no
Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2509
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Author Walker, W.H. 2nd; Borniger, J.C.; Gaudier-Diaz, M.M.; Hecmarie Melendez-Fernandez, O.; Pascoe, J.L.; Courtney DeVries, A.; Nelson, R.J.
Title Acute exposure to low-level light at night is sufficient to induce neurological changes and depressive-like behavior Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Molecular Psychiatry Abbreviated Journal Mol Psychiatry
Volume Issue Pages s41380
Keywords Animals; mouse models; mood disorders; Human Health
Abstract The advent and wide-spread adoption of electric lighting over the past century has profoundly affected the circadian organization of physiology and behavior for many individuals in industrialized nations; electric lighting in homes, work environments, and public areas have extended daytime activities into the evening, thus, increasing night-time exposure to light. Although initially assumed to be innocuous, chronic exposure to light at night (LAN) is now associated with increased incidence of cancer, metabolic disorders, and affective problems in humans. However, little is known about potential acute effects of LAN. To determine whether acute exposure to low-level LAN alters brain function, adult male, and female mice were housed in either light days and dark nights (LD; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 0 lux) or light days and low level light at night (LAN; 14 h of 150 lux:10 h of 5 lux). Mice exposed to LAN on three consecutive nights increased depressive-like responses compared to mice housed in dark nights. In addition, female mice exposed to LAN increased central tendency in the open field. LAN was associated with reduced hippocampal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) in both male and female mice, as well as increased VEGFR1 and interleukin-1beta mRNA expression in females, and reduced brain derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in males. Further, LAN significantly altered circadian rhythms (activity and temperature) and circadian gene expression in female and male mice, respectively. Altogether, this study demonstrates that acute exposure to LAN alters brain physiology and can be detrimental to well-being in otherwise healthy individuals.
Address (down) Department of Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 26506, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1359-4184 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31138889; PMCID:PMC6881534 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2768
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Author Smit, A.N.; Broesch, T.; Siegel, J.M.; Mistlberger, R.E.
Title Sleep timing and duration in indigenous villages with and without electric lighting on Tanna Island, Vanuatu Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 17278
Keywords Human Health
Abstract It has been hypothesized that sleep in the industrialized world is in chronic deficit, due in part to evening light exposure, which delays sleep onset and truncates sleep depending on morning work or school schedules. If so, societies without electricity may sleep longer. However, recent studies of hunter-gatherers and pastoralists living traditional lifestyles without electricity report short sleep compared to industrialized population norms. To further explore the impact of lifestyles and electrification on sleep, we measured sleep by actigraphy in indigenous Melanesians on Tanna Island, Vanuatu, who live traditional subsistence horticultural lifestyles, in villages either with or without access to electricity. Sleep duration was long and efficiency low in both groups, compared to averages from actigraphy studies of industrialized populations. In villages with electricity, light exposure after sunset was increased, sleep onset was delayed, and nocturnal sleep duration was reduced. These effects were driven primarily by breastfeeding mothers living with electric lighting. Relatively long sleep on Tanna may reflect advantages of an environment in which food access is reliable, climate benign, and predators and significant social conflict absent. Despite exposure to outdoor light throughout the day, an effect of artificial evening light was nonetheless detectable on sleep timing and duration.
Address (down) Department of Psychology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A1S6, Canada. mistlber@sfu.ca
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:31754265 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2764
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Author LeGates, T.A.; Kvarta, M.D.
Title Illuminating a path from light to depression Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Nature Neuroscience Abbreviated Journal Nat Neurosci
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Commentary; Animals; Human Health
Abstract Our light environment can strongly influence our mental health. Kai An and colleagues dissect the neuronal circuit mediating depression-related behaviors induced by mistimed light input in mice, implicating the nucleus accumbens as the downstream target of the neural pathway between intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells and the perihabenular nucleus.
Address (down) Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1097-6256 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32555525 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3015
Permanent link to this record