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Author Durrant, J.; Green, M.P.; Jones, T.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Dim artificial light at night reduces the cellular immune response of the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Insect Science Abbreviated Journal Insect Sci  
  Volume in press Issue Pages 744-7917.12665  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract A functioning immune system is crucial for protection against disease and illness, yet increasing evidence suggests that species living in urban areas could be suffering from immune suppression, due to the presence of artificial light at night (ALAN). This study examined the effects of ecologically relevant levels of ALAN on three key measures of immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity, and phenoloxidase activity) using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We reared crickets under an ecologically relevant daily light-cycle consisting of 12 hr bright daylight (2600 lx) followed by either 12 h darkness (0 lx) or dim environmentally-relevant ALAN (1, 10, 100 lx), and then assessed immune function at multiple time points throughout adult life using haemolymph samples. We found that the presence of ALAN had a clear negative effect on haemocytes, while the effects on lytic activity and phenoloxidase activity were more complex or largely unaffected by ALAN. Furthermore, the effects of lifelong exposure to ALAN of 1 lx were comparable to those of 10 and 100 lx. Our data suggest that the effects of ALAN could be large and widespread, and such reductions in the core immune response of individuals will likely have greater consequences for fitness and survival under more malign conditions, such as those of the natural environment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address (down) The School of BioSciences, Faculty of Science, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1672-9609 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30720239 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2196  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Yoshinaka, K.; Yamaguchi, A.; Matsumura, R.; Node, K.; Tokuda, I.; Akashi, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effect of different light-dark schedules on estrous cycle in mice, and implications for mitigating the adverse impact of night work Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Genes to Cells : Devoted to Molecular & Cellular Mechanisms Abbreviated Journal Genes Cells  
  Volume 22 Issue 10 Pages 876-884  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Approximately 20% of workers in developed countries are involved in night work. Nevertheless, many studies have strongly suggested that night-work-induced chronic circadian misalignment increases the risk of a diverse range of health problems. Although a relation between night work and irregular menstrual cycles has been indicated epidemiologically, a direct causal link remains elusive. Here, we report that repetitive reversal of light-dark (LD) cycles triggers irregular estrous cycles in mice. The findings showed that the estrous cycle remained irregular for more than four weeks after the mice were returned to regular LD cycles. Importantly, the magnitude of the negative impact of reversed LD cycles on the estrous cycle, or more specifically the decreased number of normal estrous cycles during the observation period, was dependent on the difference in the frequency of LD reversal. Presently, no clear solution to prevent night-work-mediated menstrual abnormalities is available, and reducing night work in modern society is difficult. Our findings indicate that optimizing work schedules could significantly prevent menstrual problems without reducing total night-work time.  
  Address (down) The Research Institute for Time Studies, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi, 753-8511, Japan  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1356-9597 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28884885 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1722  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Lin, J.; Ding, X.; Hong, C.; Pang, Y.; Chen, L.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, X.; Xin, H.; Wang, X. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Several biological benefits of the low color temperature light-emitting diodes based normal indoor lighting source Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Issue 1 Pages 7560  
  Keywords Human Health; Lighting  
  Abstract Currently, light pollution has become a nonnegligible issue in our daily life. Artificial light sources with high color temperature were deem to be the major pollution source, which could induce several adverse effects on human's health. In our previous research, we have firstly developed an artificial indoor light with low color temperature (1900 K). However, the biological effects of this artificial light on human's health are unclear. Here, four artificial lights (1900 K, 3000 K, 4000 K and 6600 K) were used to evaluate some biological changes in both human (in total 152 person-times) and murine models. Compared with other three high color temperature artificial lights, our lights (1900 K) presented a positive effect on promoting the secreting of melatonin and glutamate, protecting human's eyes, accelerating would healing and hair regeneration. These systematical studies indicated that the proposed low color temperature (1900 K) light could provide several significant benefits in human's daily life.  
  Address (down) The National Engineering Research Center for Bioengineering Drugs and the Technologies, Institute of Translational Medicine, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, 330031, China. wangxiaolei@ncu.edu.cn  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31101840 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2501  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Malek, I.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Bright artificial light-at-night is associated with increased body mass, poor reproductive success, and compromised disease tolerance in Australian budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Integrative Zoology Abbreviated Journal Integr Zool  
  Volume 14 Issue 6 Pages 589-603  
  Keywords Animals; Birds; Australian budgerigars; Melopsittacus undulatus; Photoperiod; captive birds  
  Abstract Artificial light-at-night (ALAN) can cause circadian disruption and result in adverse behavioral and ecological effects in free-living birds, but studies on captive pet birds as companion animals have been infrequent. We studied the effects of exposure to bright ALAN on body mass, melatonin sulfate levels, reproduction, and disease severity in Australian budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) kept in captivity. During the experiment, birds were kept under outdoor temperature, humidity, and natural photoperiod from September to December. 48 birds were equally split into four groups (6 mating pairs each) and concurrently exposed to ALAN of 200 lux with different duration (0, 30, 60, and 90 min). Monthly observations were recorded for all dependent parameters. ALAN exposure increased mass gain and suppressed melatonin levels in a dose-dependent manner, especially during December. In addition, ALAN exposure in all duration groups decreased egg production and reduced hatchability from 61+/-14% in the ALAN-unexposed control group to 0% in the ALAN-exposed birds. Disease severity was also found to increase in line with the duration of ALAN exposure. In captive M. undulatus, ALAN exposure was demonstrated to affect photoperiodic regulation with subsequent excess mass gain, reproduction impairment, and increased susceptibility to infections plausibly through duration dose-dependent suppression of melatonin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a possible association between acute bright ALAN of increasing duration and both natural development of infections as well as reproductive cessation in captive birds. Our findings could be used to improve breeding conditions of captive birds.  
  Address (down) The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa 31905, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1749-4869 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31149779 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2512  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Willis, G.L.; Freelance, C.B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effect of directed photic stimulation of the pineal on experimental Parkinson's disease Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Physiology & Behavior Abbreviated Journal Physiol Behav  
  Volume 182 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The role of the circadian system in Parkinson's disease (PD) is a topic of increasing scientific interest. This has emerged from recent studies demonstrating an altered response of PD patients to treatment in relation to the phase of the light/dark cycle and from other work defining the functional significance of melanocytes in PD: a cell type that the nigro-striatal dopamine (NSD) system and circadian system both contain. The present study was undertaken to determine the sensitivity of the pineal, as the final common pathway of the circadian system, to light delivered directly to the pineal via surgical implantation of LEDs. Direct photic stimulation of the pineal altered the course of experimental PD while anatomical controls receiving stimulation of the frontal cortex exhibited a negative impact on the course of recovery of these animals. These effects were closely linked to the phase of the light/dark cycle. The present results suggest that while pineal photoreceptors are regarded as vestigial, functional photo-reactivity of the pineal remains. It is inferred that melanocytes are the active cells responsible for the observed effect since they remain functionally intact in mammalian pineal even though pineal photoreceptors are functionally inert. Although the stimuli applied in the present study may be regarded as artificial this study demonstrates that brain parenchyma remains differentially reactive to direct light exposure and presents a novel mechanism in circadian structures that needs to be explored.  
  Address (down) The Bronowski Institute of Behavioural Neuroscience, Coliban Medical Centre, 19 Jennings Street, Kyneton, Victoria 3444, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0031-9384 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:28919247 Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1732  
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