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Author Coesfeld, J.; Anderson, S.; Baugh, K.; Elvidge, C.; Schernthanner, H.; Kyba, C.
Title Variation of Individual Location Radiance in VIIRS DNB Monthly Composite Images Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 10 Issue 12 Pages 1964
Keywords Remote Sensing; Instrumentation
Abstract With the growing size and use of night light time series from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day/Night Band (DNB), it is important to understand the stability of the dataset. All satellites observe differences in pixel values during repeat observations. In the case of night light data, these changes can be due to both environmental effects and changes in light emission. Here we examine the stability of individual locations of particular large scale light sources (e.g., airports and prisons) in the monthly composites of DNB data from April 2012 to September 2017. The radiances for individual pixels of most large light emitters are approximately normally distributed, with a standard deviation of typically 15–20% of the mean. Greenhouses and flares, however, are not stable sources. We observe geospatial autocorrelation in the monthly variations for nearby sites, while the correlation for sites separated by large distances is small. This suggests that local factors contribute most to the variation in the pixel radiances and furthermore that averaging radiances over large areas will reduce the total variation. A better understanding of the causes of temporal variation would improve the sensitivity of DNB to lighting changes.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2129
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Author Bombieri, G.; Delgado, M. del M.; Russo, L.F.; Garrote, P.J.; López-Bao, J.V.; Fedriani, J.M.; Penteriani, V.
Title Patterns of wild carnivore attacks on humans in urban areas Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal Sci Rep
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Attacks by wild carnivores on humans represent an increasing problem in urban areas across North America and their frequency is expected to rise following urban expansion towards carnivore habitats. Here, we analyzed records of carnivore attacks on humans in urban areas of the U.S. and Canada between 1980 and 2016 to analyze the general patterns of the attacks, as well as describe the landscape structure and, for those attacks occurring at night, the light conditions at the site of the attacks. We found that several behavioral and landscape-related factors were recurrent elements in the attacks recorded. The species for which the attack locations were available (coyote and black bear) attacked in areas with different conditions of landscape structure and artificial light. Specifically, black bears attacked more frequently in areas with abundant and aggregated vegetation cover and scarce buildings and roads, while coyotes attacked in a broader range of landscape conditions. At night, black bears attacked in generally darker areas than coyotes. By providing a comprehensive perspective of the phenomenon, this study will improve our understanding of how effective strategies aimed at reducing the frequency of risky encounters in urban areas should be developed.
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Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2130
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Author Dunster, G.P.; de la Iglesia, L.; Ben-Hamo, M.; Nave, C.; Fleischer, J.G.; Panda, S.; de la Iglesia, H.O.
Title Sleepmore in Seattle: Later school start times are associated with more sleep and better performance in high school students Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Science Advances Abbreviated Journal Sci. Adv.
Volume 4 Issue 12 Pages eaau6200
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Most teenagers are chronically sleep deprived. One strategy proposed to lengthen adolescent sleep is to delay secondary school start times. This would allow students to wake up later without shifting their bedtime, which is biologically determined by the circadian clock, resulting in a net increase in sleep. So far, there is no objective quantitative data showing that a single intervention such as delaying the school start time significantly increases daily sleep. The Seattle School District delayed the secondary school start time by nearly an hour. We carried out a pre-/post-research study and show that there was an increase in the daily median sleep duration of 34 min, associated with a 4.5% increase in the median grades of the students and an improvement in attendance.
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Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2375-2548 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2131
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Author Lowden, A.; Lemos, N.; Gonçalves, B.; Öztürk, G.; Louzada, F.; Pedrazzoli, M.; Moreno, C.
Title Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers Type Journal Article
Year 2018 Publication Clocks & Sleep Abbreviated Journal Clocks & Sleep
Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 105-116
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Natural daylight exposures in arctic regions vary substantially across seasons. Negative consequences have been observed in self-reports of sleep and daytime functions during the winter but have rarely been studied in detail. The focus of the present study set out to investigate sleep seasonality among indoor workers using objective and subjective measures. Sleep seasonality among daytime office workers (n = 32) in Kiruna (Sweden, 67.86° N, 20.23° E) was studied by comparing the same group of workers in a winter and summer week, including work and days off at the weekend, using actigraphs (motion loggers) and subjective ratings of alertness and mood. Actigraph analyses showed delayed sleep onset of 39 min in winter compared to the corresponding summer week (p < 0.0001) and shorter weekly sleep duration by 12 min (p = 0.0154). A delay of mid-sleep was present in winter at workdays (25 min, p < 0.0001) and more strongly delayed during days off (46 min, p < 0.0001). Sleepiness levels were higher in winter compared to summer (p < 0.05). Increased morning light exposure was associated with earlier mid-sleep (p < 0.001), while increased evening light exposure was associated with delay (p < 0.01). This study confirms earlier work that suggests that lack of natural daylight delays the sleep/wake cycle in a group of indoor workers, despite having access to electric lighting. Photic stimuli resulted in a general advanced sleep/wake rhythm during summer and increased alertness levels.
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ISSN 2624-5175 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2137
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Author Rabstein, S.; Burek, K.; Lehnert, M.; Beine, A.; Vetter, C.; Harth, V.; Putzke, S.; Kantermann, T.; Walther, J.; Wang-Sattler, R.; Pallapies, D.; Brüning, T.; Behrens, T.
Title Differences in twenty-four-hour profiles of blue-light exposure between day and night shifts in female medical staff Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Science of The Total Environment Abbreviated Journal Science of The Total Environment
Volume 653 Issue Pages 1025-1033
Keywords Human Health
Abstract Light is the strongest zeitgeber currently known for the synchronization of the human circadian timing system. Especially shift workers are exposed to altered daily light profiles. Our objective is the characterization of differences in blue-light exposures between day and night shift taking into consideration modifying factors such as chronotype. We describe 24-hour blue-light profiles as measured with ambient light data loggers (LightWatcher) during up to three consecutive days with either day or night shifts in 100 female hospital staff including 511 observations. Linear mixed models were applied to analyze light profiles and to select time-windows for the analysis of associations between shift work, individual factors, and log mean light exposures as well as the duration of darkness per day. Blue-light profiles reflected different daily activities and were mainly influenced by work time. Except for evening (7–9 p.m.), all time windows showed large differences in blue-light exposures between day and night shifts. Night work reduced the duration of darkness per day by almost 4 h (beta = −3:48 hh:mm, 95% CI (−4:27; −3.09)). Late chronotypes had higher light exposures in the morning and evening compared to women with intermediate chronotype (e.g. morning beta = 0.50 log(mW/m2/nm), 95% CI (0.08; 0.93)). Women with children had slightly higher light exposures in the afternoon than women without children (beta = 0.48, 95% CI (−0.10; 1,06)). Time windows for the description of light should be chosen carefully with regard to timing of shifts. Our results are helpful for future studies to capture relevant light exposure differences and potential collinearities with individual factors. Improvement of well-being of shift workers with altered light profiles may therefore require consideration of both – light at the workplace and outside working hours.
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2139
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