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Author Fotios, S.; Yao, Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The association between correlated colour temperature and scotopic/photopic ratio Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume 35 Issue 10 Pages 1365-1374  
  Keywords Vision; Lighting  
  Abstract The scotopic/photopic ratio (S/P) is a parameter that may be considered in the design of road lighting. This paper compares the S/P ratio and correlated colour temperature (CCT) for 297 light source spectra identified in IES Technical Memorandum TM-30-15 to test the assumption that higher S/P ratios demand higher CCTs. The results suggest that, for a given lamp type, there is a strong association between S/P ratio and CCT, and hence that for a given CCT only a small variation in S/P ratio is available. However, the results also suggest that a larger variation in S/P ratio is possible if the lighting designer is able to consider a change in lamp type.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1954  
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Author Patel, J.S.; Radetsky, L.; Rea, M.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Value of Red Light at Night for Increasing Basil Yield Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Canadian Journal of Plant Science Abbreviated Journal Can. J. Plant Sci.  
  Volume 98 Issue 6 Pages 1321-1330  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Sweet basil (<i>Ocimum basilicum L.</i>) is primarily used for culinary purposes, but it is also used in the fragrance and medicinal industries. In the last few years, global sweet basil production has been significantly impacted by downy mildew caused by <i>Peronospora belbahrii</i>. Nighttime exposure to red light has been shown to inhibit sporulation of <i>P. belbahrii</i>. The objective of this study was to determine if nighttime exposure to red light from light-emitting diodes (LEDs; λ<sub>max</sub> = 625 nm) could increase plant growth (plant height and leaf size) and yield (number and weight of leaves) in basil plants. In two sets of greenhouse experiments, red light was applied at a photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of 60 µmol m<sup>-2</sup> s<sup>-1</sup> during the otherwise dark night for 10 hours (from 20:00 to 06:00). The results demonstrate that exposure to red light at night can increase the number of basil leaves per plant, plant height, leaf size (length and width), and leaf fresh and dry weight, compared to plants in darkness at night. The addition of incremental red light at night has the potential to be cost-effective for fresh organic basil production in controlled environments.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0008-4220 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1955  
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Author Miller, S.D.; Straka III, W.C.; Yue, J.; Seaman, C.J.; Xu, S.; Elvidge, C.D.; Hoffmann, L.; Azeem, I. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The Dark Side of Hurricane Matthew: Unique Perspectives from the VIIRS Day/Night Band Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Abbreviated Journal Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.  
  Volume 99 Issue 12 Pages 2561-2574  
  Keywords remote sensing  
  Abstract Hurricane Matthew (28 Sep – 9 October 2016) was perhaps the most infamous storm of the 2016 Atlantic hurricane season, claiming over 600 lives and causing over $15 billion USD in damages across the central Caribbean and southeastern U.S. seaboard. Research surrounding Matthew and its many noteworthy meteorological characteristics (e.g., rapid intensification into the southernmost Category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin on record, strong lightning and sprite production, and unusual cloud morphology) is ongoing. Satellite remote sensing typically plays an important role in the forecasting and study of hurricanes, providing a top-down perspective on storms developing over the remote and inherently data sparse tropical oceans. In this regard, a relative newcomer among the suite of satellite observations useful for tropical cyclone monitoring and research is the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB), a sensor flying onboard the NOAA/NASA Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite. Unlike conventional instruments, the DNB's sensitivity to extremely low levels of visible/near-infrared light offers new insight on storm properties and impacts. Here, we chronicle Matthew’s path of destruction and peer through the DNB’s looking glass of low-light visible observations, including lightning connected to sprite formation, modulation of the atmospheric nightglow by storm-generated gravity waves, and widespread power outages. Collected without moonlight, these examples showcase the wealth of unique information present in DNB nocturnal low-light observations without moonlight, and their potential to complement traditional satellite measurements of tropical storms worldwide.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0003-0007 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1959  
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Author Grubisic, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Waters under Artificial Lights: Does Light Pollution Matter for Aquatic Primary Producers? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Limnology and Oceanography Bulletin Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue 3 Pages 76-81  
  Keywords Ecology  
  Abstract Bright night lights have become a symbol of development and prosperity in the modern world. But have you ever wondered how artificial light at night (ALAN) may be affecting living beings in our cities, and how it may be affecting us? As artificial illumination is transforming nocturnal environments around the world, light pollution associated with its use is becoming a topic of increasing interest in the scientific and public communities. Light pollution disrupts natural light regimes in many regions of the world, raising concerns about ecological and health impacts of this novel anthropogenic pressure. Most obviously, ALAN can influence night‐active animals in urban and suburban areas, and most research in this growing field focuses on terrestrial organisms such as bats, birds, and insects. Effects on aquatic ecosystems are much less known. In particular, aquatic primary producers, such as microalgae, cyanobacteria, and plants, have rarely been studied despite their critical positioning in the base of aquatic food webs and the fundamental role that light plays in their ecology. For primary producers, light is a key source of both energy and environmental information; it influences their growth, production, and community structure. ALAN has therefore a large potential to influence their communities and induce bottom‐up changes to aquatic ecosystems and ecosystem functions.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1966  
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Author Ngarambe, J.; Lim, H.S.; Kim, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light Pollution: Is there an Environmental Kuznets Curve? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Sustainable Cities and Society Abbreviated Journal Sustainable Cities and Society  
  Volume 42 Issue Pages 337-343  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Economics; Lighting  
  Abstract Light pollution is ranked high among recent forms of environmental degradation. While there have been many studies focusing on the diverse effects of artificial lighting on human health, wild life, etc., studies related to the social-economic impact of light pollution have been neglected. In the current paper, we assessed the relationship between economic development and light pollution. Using collected field data of illuminance levels as a measure of light pollution and land prices as an indicator of economic development, we drew conclusions about the effects of economic development on light pollution. The results did not show an inverted-U relationship between the two variables, hence denouncing the Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) theory. A regression analysis test showed an R-squared value of 0.322 at p > 0.215. Looking at the obtained results, which show no statistical significance between the two variables, we advise that local light pollution regulation laws and policies be equally stringent throughout districts/cities, regardless of economic status.  
  Address (up)  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2210-6707 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1969  
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