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Author Eisenbeis, G.
Title Künstliches Licht und Insekten: eine vergleichende Studie in Rheinhessen Type Journal Article
Year 2001 Publication Schriftenreihe Landespflege Naturschutz Abbreviated Journal
Volume 67 Issue Pages 75-100
Keywords Ecology; Animals
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 481
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Author Roychowdhury, K.; Jones, S.; Arrowsmith, C.; Reinke, K.
Title Indian census using satellite images: Can DMSP-OLS data be used for small administrative regions? Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Urban Remote Sensing Event (JURSE), 2011 Joint Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 153 - 156
Keywords Remote Sensing; India; South Asia; DMSP; DMSP-OLS
Abstract India conducts its census every ten years. Census data is collected manually in India with enumerators visiting every household in the country. Being such a vast country (in terms of area) and with a population of more than 1 billion, manual data collection is a laborious and expensive process. In response, this paper proposes a surrogate census method using DMSP-OLS night-time images. The study focuses on smaller administrative regions such as sub-districts (or taluks as they are known in the country) in the state of Maharashtra. Models are proposed using selected census metrics, and mean and standard deviation of stable lights and brightness information as obtained from the satellite images. The adjusted r2 values range from 0.2 to 0.8 at 95% confidence interval, with the majority of the metrics being moderately correlated (with r2 between 0.4 and 0.7). Generally it was found that the observed lights and brightness of big rural settlements from DMSP-OLS images have the potential for predicting certain census metrics. However, unlike larger areas such as districts where DMSP-OLS night-time images adequately predict census metrics, at the sub-district level the results need to be supplemented and validated with other information sources such as survey reports.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 490
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Author Zamorano Calvo, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Pascual Ramírez, S.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Ramírez Moreta, P.; Challupner, P.
Title ISS nocturnal images as a scientific tool against Light Pollution Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Unpublished working paper submitted to NASA JSC Imaging Lab Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract The potential of the night pictures taken from the International Space Station (ISS) with a Nikon D3s digital camera to fight against light pollution is shown. A scientific analysis of ISS026-E-26493 RAW image of Madrid at night with techniques used by astronomers and cartographers is performed. We suggest an observational setup to obtain useful scientific information from the pictures including series of exposures and calibration frames.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 492
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Author Kocifaj, M.; Solano Lamphar, H.A.
Title Quantitative analysis of night skyglow amplification under cloudy conditions Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Abbreviated Journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume 443 Issue 4 Pages 3665-3674
Keywords Skyglow; radiative transfer; scattering; atmospheric effects; light pollution; methods: numerical
Abstract The radiance produced by artificial light is a major source of nighttime over-illumination. It can, however, be treated experimentally using ground-based and satellite data. These two types of data complement each other and together have a high information content. For instance, the satellite data enable upward light emissions to be normalized, and this in turn allows skyglow levels at the ground to be modelled under cloudy or overcast conditions. Excessive night lighting imposes an unacceptable burden on nature, humans and professional astronomy. For this reason, there is a pressing need to determine the total amount of downwelling diffuse radiation. Undoubtedly, cloudy periods can cause a significant increase in skyglow as a result of amplification owing to diffuse reflection from clouds. While it is recognized that the amplification factor (AF) varies with cloud cover, the effects of different types of clouds, of atmospheric turbidity and of the geometrical relationships between the positions of an individual observer, the cloud layer, and the light source are in general poorly known. In this paper the AF is quantitatively analysed considering different aerosol optical depths (AODs), urban layout sizes and cloud types with specific albedos and altitudes. The computational results show that the AF peaks near the edges of a city rather than at its centre. In addition, the AF appears to be a decreasing function of AOD, which is particularly important when modelling the skyglow in regions with apparent temporal or seasonal variability of atmospheric turbidity. The findings in this paper will be useful to those designing engineering applications or modelling light pollution, as well as to astronomers and environmental scientists who aim to predict the amplification of skyglow caused by clouds. In addition, the semi-analytical formulae can be used to estimate the AF levels, especially in densely populated metropolitan regions for which detailed computations may be CPU-intensive. These new results are of theoretical and experimental significance as they will motivate experimentalists to collect data from various regions to build an overall picture of the AF, and will encourage modellers to test the consistency with theoretical predictions.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 538
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Author Duriscoe, D.M.
Title Measuring Anthropogenic Sky Glow Using a Natural Sky Brightness Model. Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Abbreviated Journal
Volume 125 Issue 933 Pages 1370-1382
Keywords Skyglow
Abstract Anthropogenic sky glow (a result of light pollution) combines with the natural background brightness of the night sky when viewed by an observer on the earth’s surface. In order to measure the anthropogenic component accurately, the natural component must be identified and subtracted. A model of the moonless natural sky brightness in the V-band was constructed from existing data on the Zodiacal Light, an airglow model based on the van Rhijn function, and a model of integrated starlight (including diffuse galactic light) constructed from images made with the same equipment used for sky brightness observations. The model also incorporates effective extinction by the atmosphere and is improved at high zenith angles (>80°) by the addition of atmospheric diffuse light. The model may be projected onto local horizon coordinates for a given observation at a resolution of 0.05° over the hemisphere of the sky, allowing it to be accurately registered with data images obtained from any site. Zodiacal Light and integrated starlight models compare favorably with observations from remote dark sky sites, matching within ± 8 nL over 95% of the sky. The natural airglow may be only approximately modeled, errors of up to ± 25 nL are seen when the airglow is rapidly changing or has considerable character (banding); ± 8 nL precision may be expected under favorable conditions. When subtracted from all-sky brightness data images, the model significantly improves estimates of sky glow from anthropogenic sources, especially at sites that experience slight to moderate light pollution.
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Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 539
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