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Author Warrant, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Superior vision in nocturnal insects inspires new night vision technologies Type Newspaper Article
  Year 2016 Publication SPIE Newsroom Abbreviated Journal SPIE Newsroom  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Vision; Animals; Instrumentation  
  Abstract Algorithms that dramatically improve the quality of video sequences captured in very dim light have been developed on the basis of the neural mechanisms in nocturnal insects with excellent visual capabilities.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1818-2259 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @; GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1418  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Grove, L. pdf  url
openurl 
  Title Reducing Acadia's Light Pollution Type Manuscript
  Year 2016 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Conservation; Society; Economics; Acadia National Park; Maine; benefit cost analysis; astrotourism; contingent valuation method; dark sky places; dark sky park  
  Abstract Acadia National Park is among the most visited national parks in the United States, attracting millions of people per year. Thousands of those visitors come to the park for “astro-tourism,” as Acadia has become one of the premier stargazing locations on the east coast. There remains, however, the continued threat from light pollution from the surrounding communities that negatively affects Acadia's darkness, contributing to a lesser visitor experience and potentially harming native ecosystems. Although park management and community organizations have engaged in significant efforts to decrease Acadia's nighttime light levels and raise awareness among visitors and locals regarding the importance of darkness, the park still seek to continue to decrease light pollution. This report developed policy options that could help solve the long-term policy goal of decreasing nighttime lighting levels within and around Acadia while also using the International Dark-Sky Association's Dark-Sky Park designation requirements as a reasonable, short-term policy benchmark.

Working within existing organizations, the policy options crafted to address Acadia’s nighttime lighting levels were analyzed both qualitatively through a criteria evaluation and quantitatively through a Benefit Cost Analysis.

The options included 1) the formation of a Darkness Coalition within the League of Towns, 2) a reimagining of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Dark-Sky Project into the Dark-Sky Taskforce, 3) the creation of a Lighting Consultant position paid through the Friends of Acadia Wild Acadia initiative, and 4) the combination of Coalition and the Taskforce into the League of Towns – Dark-Sky Partnership (LOT-DSP). The report recommends the adoption of Option 4 – the creation of the LOT – DSP. While this option does not provide the greatest estimated monetary net value compared to the Status Quo in the quantitative evaluation, it still provides an estimated benefit of about $105 million over the course of five years and is the strongest option in the qualitative analysis. The LOT – DSP provides the best opportunity for Acadia to achieve legitimate and long-lasting nighttime light level reduction.
 
  Address Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, Garrett Hall, 235 McCormick Road, P.O. Box 400893, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4893 USA; locher.grove(at)gmail.com  
  Corporate Author Thesis Master's thesis  
  Publisher University of Virginia Place of Publication Charlottesville Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1449  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Brady, A.; Willis, B.; Harder, L.; Vizel, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lunar Phase Modulates Circadian Gene Expression Cycles in the Broadcast Spawning Coral Acropora millepora Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Biological Bulletin Abbreviated Journal Biol Bullet  
  Volume 230 Issue 2 Pages 130-142  
  Keywords Animals; corals; Acropora millepora; lunar cycle; Circadian Rhythm; gene expression; moon  
  Abstract Many broadcast spawning corals in multiple reef regions release their gametes with incredible temporal precision just once per year, using the lunar cycle to set the night of spawning. Moonlight, rather than tides or other lunar-regulated processes, is thought to be the proximate factor responsible for linking the night of spawning to the phase of the Moon. We compared patterns of gene expression among colonies of the broadcast spawning coral Acropora millepora at different phases of the lunar cycle, and when they were maintained under one of three experimentally simulated lunar lighting treatments: i) lunar lighting conditions matching those on the reef, or lunar patterns mimicking either ii) constant full Moon conditions, or iii) constant new Moon conditions. Normal lunar illumination was found to shift both the level and timing of clock gene transcription cycles between new and full moons, with the peak hour of expression for a number of genes occurring earlier in the evening under a new Moon when compared to a full Moon. When the normal lunar cycle is replaced with nighttime patterns equivalent to either a full Moon or a new Moon every evening, the normal monthlong changes in the level of expression are destroyed for most genes. In combination, these results indicate that daily changes in moonlight that occur over the lunar cycle are essential for maintaining normal lunar periodicity of clock gene transcription, and this may play a role in regulating spawn timing. These data also show that low levels of light pollution may have an impact on coral biological clocks.  
  Address Department of Biological Science, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4, Canada; pvize(at)ucalgary.ca  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Marine Biological Laboratory Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1476  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Challéat, S.; Lapostolle, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Concilier éclairage urbain et environnement nocturne : Les enjeux d’une controverse sociotechnique Type Journal Article
  Year 2014 Publication Natures Sciences Sociétés Abbreviated Journal Nat. Sci. Soc.  
  Volume 22 Issue 4 Pages 317-328  
  Keywords History; Energy; Planning; Regulation; Society  
  Abstract La question de l’éclairage urbain nocturne est posée publiquement de manière de plus en plus significative, d’abord aux États-Unis puis en Europe. Cantonnée à l’origine au domaine de l’astronomie, cette question pose problème dans différents secteurs : l’environnement, la santé, l’urbanisme, mais aussi et surtout l’énergie... En croisant une approche sociologique avec une approche géographique, les auteurs font le récit d’une controverse environnementale aboutissant, en France, à l’inscription de la notion de pollution lumineuse dans la loi Grenelle et questionnent sa dimension spatiale. Ils montrent les différentes logiques et interprétations, à l’œuvre autour de la distinction entre « pollution » et « nuisance » lumineuses, qui traversent les scènes de négociation sur les processus de normalisation et la mobilisation d’outils de zonage.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language French Summary Language French Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1240-1307 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved (up) no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1522  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Delhey, K.; Peters, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Implications for conservation of anthropogenic impacts on visual communication and camouflage Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Conservation Biology : the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal Conserv Biol  
  Volume 31 Issue 1 Pages 30-39  
  Keywords Conservation  
  Abstract Anthropogenic environmental impacts can disrupt the sensory environment of animals and affect important processes from mate choice to predator avoidance. Currently these effects are best understood for auditory and chemo-sensory modalities and recent reviews highlight their importance for conservation. Here we summarise how anthropogenic changes to the visual environment (ambient light, transmission, backgrounds) affect visual communication and camouflage, and highlight implications for conservation. These implications are particularly evident for disrupted camouflage due to its tight links with survival while the conservation importance of impaired visual communication is less well-documented. Such effects can be potentially severe when they affect critical processes such as pollination or species recognition. However, when impaired mate choice does not lead to hybridization, the conservation consequences are less clear. We suggest that the demographic effects of human impacts on visual communication and camouflage will be particularly strong when: (a) human-induced modifications to the visual environment are evolutionary novel, that is, very different from natural variation, (b) affected species and populations have low levels of intraspecific (genotypic and phenotypic) variation and low levels of behavioural, sensory or physiological plasticity and (c) the processes affected are directly related to survival (camouflage), species recognition, or number of offspring produced, rather than offspring quality or attractiveness. The evidence summarized here suggests that anthropogenic effects on the visual environment might be of similar conservation concerns as those on other sensory modalities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address 25 Rainforest Walk, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, 3800, Clayton, Victoria, Australia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0888-8892 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:27604521 Approved (up) no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1525  
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