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Author (down) Yang, M.; Wang, S.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, L. url  openurl
  Title Review on Applications of DMSP/OLS Night-time Emissions Data Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Remote Sensing Technology and Application Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 26 Issue 1 Pages 45-51  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The Defense Meteorological Satellite System(DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) has a unique low\|light imaging capability developed for the detection of clouds lit by mooolight.In addition to moonlit clouds,the OLS sensor also detects nocturnal lights from the earth surface.Hence,DMSP/OLS night\|time emissions data becomes well known as a means of monitoring human activities.In this paper,we reviewed a number of applications that had been developed or proposed based on the DMSP/OLS night\|time emissions data,such as monitoring city lights,light pollution,fires,fishing boats and gas flare,and estimating socioeconomic data.Finally,the advantages and disadvantages of night light data were listed and more applications are expected in the future based on the available light emission data.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kagoburian @ Serial 899  
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Author (down) Yang, M.; Chen, Q.; Zhu, Y.; Zhou, Q.; Geng, Y.; Lu, C.; Wang, G.; Yang, C.-M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title The effects of intermittent light during the evening on sleepiness, sleep electroencephalographic spectral power and performance the next morning Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract Most studies on the effects of light exposure have been conducted with continuous light. The present study investigated the effects of intermittent light exposure on sleepiness, mood, electroencephalographic activity during sleep and performance the next morning. Fifteen volunteers were scheduled to come to the sleep laboratory to experience different lighting conditions: intermittent bright light, continuous bright light and continuous dim light. Subjective sleepiness and mood were assessed during light exposure, with electroencephalographic recording during sleep. After waking the next morning, participants filled out questionnaires and went through two cognitive tasks. The results revealed significantly lower ratings of sleepiness after intermittent light exposure, which is not different from the ratings in the continuous bright light condition, and an increase in vitality during later part of the evening and more beta activity during the first 90 minutes of sleep in the intermittent light condition, in comparison with the continuous dim light condition. However, both intermittent and continuous bright light exposure showed no difference from the continuous dim light condition in subjects' mood and cognitive functioning the next morning. The data indicated intermittent light during evening decreased sleepiness, had only minimal impact on mood in the evening, increased beta electroencephalographic activity during sleep, but had no significant influence on cognitive functioning the next morning.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2267  
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Author (down) Xu, P.; Wang, Q.; Jin, J.; Jin, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An increase in nighttime light detected for protected areas in mainland China based on VIIRS DNB data Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ecological Indicators Abbreviated Journal Ecological Indicators  
  Volume 107 Issue Pages 105615  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Protected areas, a globally accepted conservation strategy, play a fundamental role in biodiversity and species conservation. There are increasing concerns about the ecological influence of nighttime light within protected areas due to the emergence of more light-related ecological issues. Previous approaches for detecting nighttime light mainly used the traditional data source released by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS), but its coarse spatial resolution and limited radiometric resolution dramatically hamper prompt detection. In this study, we used data from a new source, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Day-Night Band (VIIRS DNB) to detect nighttime light disturbance within protected areas of mainland China. Protected areas extracted from Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (OLI-TIRS) images served as ground truths to assess detection accuracy. We found that the VIIRS DNB data provided more and better details compared with the traditional DMSP/OLS data. Pixel-based trend analysis clearly indicated that within the protected areas lighted pixels existed extensively and increased significantly from 2012 to 2017. This study provides a new solution to better understand human activities within protected areas.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1470160X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2612  
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Author (down) Xu, C.; Wang, H.-J.; Yu, Q.; Wang, H.-Z.; Liang, X.-M.; Liu, M.; Jeppesen, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Effects of Artificial LED Light on the Growth of Three Submerged Macrophyte Species during the Low-Growth Winter Season: Implications for Macrophyte Restoration in Small Eutrophic Lakes Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Water Abbreviated Journal Water  
  Volume 11 Issue 7 Pages 1512  
  Keywords Plants  
  Abstract Eutrophication of lakes is becoming a global environmental problem, leading to, among other things, rapid reproduction of phytoplankton, increased turbidity, loss of submerged macrophytes, and the recovery of these plants following nutrient loading reduction is often delayed. Artificial light supplement could potentially be a useful method to help speeding up recovery. In this study, three common species of submerged macrophytes, Vallisneria natans, Myriophyllum spicatum and Ceratophyllum demersum, were exposed to three LED light treatments (blue, red and white) and shaded (control) for 100 days (from 10 November 2016 to 18 January 2017) in 12 tanks holding 800 L of water. All the three LED light treatments promoted growth of the three macrophyte species in terms of shoot number, length and dry mass. The three light treatments differed in their effects on the growth of the plants; generally, the red light had the strongest promoting effects, followed by blue and white. The differences in light effects may be caused by the different photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) of the lights, as indicated by an observed relationship of PPFD with the growth variables. The three species also responded differently to the light treatments, V. natans and C. demersum showing higher growth than M. spicatum. Our findings demonstrate that artificial light supplement in the low-growth winter season can promote growth and recovery of submerged macrophytes and hence potentially enhance their competitiveness against phytoplankton in the following spring. More studies, however, are needed to elucidate if LED light treatment is a potential restoration method in small lakes, when the growth of submerged macrophytes are delayed following a sufficiently large external nutrient loading reduction for a shift to a clear macrophyte state to have a potential to occur. Our results may also be of relevance when elucidating the role of artificial light from cities on the ecosystem functioning of lakes in urban areas.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2073-4441 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2606  
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Author (down) Xie, Y.; Weng, Q.; Fu, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Temporal variations of artificial nighttime lights and their implications for urbanization in the conterminous United States, 2013–2017 Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Remote Sensing of Environment Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing of Environment  
  Volume 225 Issue Pages 160-174  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract Artificial nighttime lights (NTL) generated by human activities offer a unique opportunity to understand urban environments. Although previous studies have widely used NTL images to map urban extent at multiple scales, it remains a challenging task to address how NTL respond exactly to urbanization and thus to map urbanization from NTL. In this study, using monthly Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership/Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (NPP/VIIRS) NTL images between 2013 and 2017, we developed a method to decompose time-series NTL signal into annual and seasonal components. Further, we proposed an NTL-based indicator for the detection of impervious surfaces change (ISC) by integrating annual increment and seasonal variation of NTL brightness. The indicator was then used to identify ISC by using a thresholding method. The application of the methodology in the conterminous United States (CONUS) revealed a more rapid urbanization in the southern CONUS than the northern states and a northeastern-southwestern gradient of NTL seasonality. It was also found that NTL of November and December provided the most accurate characterization of urban extent for most areas in the CONUS. The detection of ISC in four representative regions (i.e. Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, greater Washington D.C., Denver-Aurora, and Atlanta) resulted in a moderate to high accuracy with the overall accuracy of ~80% and the Kappa value ranging from 0.56 to 0.73. Despite of this, the results showed a low accuracy of NTL-derived changing year of ISC (Kappa: 0.28) because of the existence of temporal inconsistency between NTL increase and ISC. The proposed method has the potential to timely map urban expansion at large geographical scales (e.g., continental and global) in a cost-efficient manner.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0034-4257 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2336  
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