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Author (down) Zeale, M.R.K.; Stone, E.L.; Zeale, E.; Browne, W.J.; Harris, S.; Jones, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Experimentally manipulating light spectra reveals the importance of dark corridors for commuting bats Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Global Change Biology Abbreviated Journal Glob Chang Biol  
  Volume in press Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The rapid global spread of artificial light at night is causing unprecedented disruption to ecosystems. In otherwise dark environments, street lights restrict the use of major flight routes by some bats, including the threatened lesser horseshoe bat Rhinolophus hipposideros, and may disrupt foraging. Using radio tracking, we examined the response of individual female R. hipposideros to experimental street lights placed on hedgerows used as major flight routes. Hedgerows were illuminated on one side over four nights using lights with different emission spectra, while the opposite side of the hedge was not illuminated. Automated bat detectors were used to examine changes in overall bat activity by R. hipposideros and other bat species present. R. hipposideros activity reduced significantly under all light types, including red light, challenging a previously held assumption that red light is safe for bats. Despite this, R. hipposideros rapidly adapted to the presence of lights by switching their flight paths to the dark side of the hedgerow, enabling them to reach foraging sites without restriction. Red light had no effect on the activity of the other species present. Slow-flying Myotis spp. avoided orange, white and green light, while more agile Pipistrellus spp. were significantly more abundant at these light types compared to dark controls, most probably in response to accumulations of insect prey. No effect of any light type was found for Nyctalus or Eptesicus spp. Our findings demonstrate that caution must be used when promoting forms of lighting that are thought to be safe for wildlife before they are tested more widely. We argue that it is essential to preserve dark corridors free from light pollution to mitigate the impacts of artificial light at night on bat activity and movements. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.  
  Address School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, University of Bristol, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, UK  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30288876 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2021  
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Author (down) Zapata, M.J.; Sullivan, S.M.P.; Gray, S.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Lighting at Night in Estuaries—Implications from Individuals to Ecosystems Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Estuaries and Coasts Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume In press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial lighting at night (ALAN) produced by urban, industrial, and roadway lighting, as well as other sources, has dramatically increased in recent decades, especially in coastal environments that support dense human populations. Artificial “lightscapes” are characterized by distinct spatial, temporal, and spectral patterns that can alter natural patterns of light and dark with consequences across levels of biological organization. At the individual level, ALAN can elicit a suite of physiological and behavioral responses associated with light-mediated processes such as diel activity patterns and predator-prey interactions. ALAN has also been shown to modify community composition and trophic structure, with implications for ecosystem-level processes including primary productivity, nutrient cycling, and the energetic linkages between aquatic and terrestrial systems. Here, we review the state of the science relative to the impacts of ALAN on estuaries, which is an important step in assessing the long-term sustainability of coastal regions. We first consider how multiple properties of ALAN (e.g., intensity and spectral content) influence the interaction between physiology and behavior of individual estuarine biota (drawing from studies on invertebrates, fishes, and birds). Second, we link individual- to community- and ecosystem-level responses, with a focus on the impacts of ALAN on food webs and implications for estuarine ecosystem functions. Coastal aquatic communities and ecosystems have been identified as a key priority for ALAN research, and a cohesive research framework will be critical for understanding and mitigating ecological consequences.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2116  
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Author (down) Zamorano, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Ocaña, F.; Pila-Diez, B.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Pascual, S.; Tapia, C.; Gallego, J.; Fernandez, A.; Nievas, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Testing sky brightness models against radial dependency: a dense two dimensional survey around the city of Madrid, Spain Type Journal Article
  Year 2016 Publication Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer Abbreviated Journal JQSRT  
  Volume 181 Issue Pages 52-66  
  Keywords Skyglow; measurements; light pollution; artificial light at night; modeling; Madrid; Spain  
  Abstract We present a study of the night sky brightness around the extended metropolitan area of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers. The map is the first to cover the spatial distribution of the sky brightness in the center of the Iberian peninsula. These surveys are neccessary to test the light pollution models that predict night sky brightness as a function of the location and brightness of the sources of light pollution and the scattering of light in the atmosphere. We describe the data-retrieval methodology, which includes an automated procedure to measure from a moving vehicle in order to speed up the data collection, providing a denser and wider survey than previous works with similar time frames. We compare the night sky brightness map to the nocturnal radiance measured from space by the DMSP satellite. We find that i) a single source model is not enough to explain the radial evolution of the night sky brightness, despite the predominance of Madrid in size and population, and ii) that the orography of the region should be taken into account when deriving geo-specific models from general first-principles models. We show the tight relationship between these two luminance measures. This finding sets up an alternative roadmap to extended studies over the globe that will not require the local deployment of photometers or trained personnel.  
  Address Dept. Astrof´ısica y CC. de la Atm´osfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid, Spain  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1323  
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Author (down) Zamorano Calvo, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Pascual Ramírez, S.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Ramírez Moreta, P.; Challupner, P. url  openurl
  Title ISS nocturnal images as a scientific tool against Light Pollution Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Unpublished working paper submitted to NASA JSC Imaging Lab Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Remote Sensing  
  Abstract The potential of the night pictures taken from the International Space Station (ISS) with a Nikon D3s digital camera to fight against light pollution is shown. A scientific analysis of ISS026-E-26493 RAW image of Madrid at night with techniques used by astronomers and cartographers is performed. We suggest an observational setup to obtain useful scientific information from the pictures including series of exposures and calibration frames.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ christopher.kyba @ Serial 492  
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Author (down) Zamorano Calvo, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Tapia Ayuga, C. url  openurl
  Title NixNox procedure to build Night Sky Brightness maps from SQM photometers observations Type Report
  Year 2014 Publication E-prints Complutense Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue 26982 Pages  
  Keywords Skyglow; measurement; SQM; SQM-L; mapping  
  Abstract The NixNox procedure to build all-sky maps of the nocturnal night sky brightness using SQM photometers is described. Astronomers belonging to amateur associations in Spain are using this observational method to obtain data of their preferred sites of observation to characterize the astronomical quality of the sky and the sources of light pollution.  
  Address Departamento de Astrofísica y Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense – 28040 Madrid, Spain  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Universidad Complutense Place of Publication Madrid Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 1435  
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