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Author (down) Zhang, Z.; Wang, H.-J.; Wang, D.-R.; Qu, W.-M.; Huang, Z.-L.
Title Red light at intensities above 10 lx alters sleep-wake behavior in mice Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Light, Science & Applications Abbreviated Journal Light Sci Appl
Volume 6 Issue 5 Pages e16231
Keywords Animals
Abstract Sleep is regulated by two mechanisms: the homeostatic process and the circadian clock. Light affects sleep and alertness by entraining the circadian clock, and acutely inducing sleep/alertness, in a manner mediated by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Because intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells are believed to be minimally sensitive to red light, which is widely used for illumination to reduce the photic disturbance to nocturnal animals during the dark phase. However, the appropriate intensity of the red light is unknown. In the present study, we recorded electroencephalograms and electromyograms of freely moving mice to investigate the effects of red light emitted by light-emitting diodes at different intensities and for different durations on the sleep-wake behavior of mice. White light was used as a control. Unexpectedly, red light exerted potent sleep-inducing effects and changed the sleep architecture in terms of the duration and number of sleep episodes, the stage transition, and the EEG power density when the intensity was >20 lx. Subsequently, we lowered the light intensity and demonstrated that red light at or below 10 lx did not affect sleep-wake behavior. White light markedly induced sleep and disrupted sleep architecture even at an intensity as low as 10 lx. Our findings highlight the importance of limiting the intensity of red light (10 lx) to avoid optical influence in nocturnal behavioral experiments, particularly in the field of sleep and circadian research.
Address Institutes of Brain Science and Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Department of Pharmacology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Clinical Geriatric Medicine, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2047-7538 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30167247; PMCID:PMC6062196 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2463
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Author (down) Zhang, X.; Yang, W.; Liang, W.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, S.
Title Intensity dependent disruptive effects of light at night on activation of the HPG axis of tree sparrows (Passer montanus) Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Animals
Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) has become increasingly recognized as a disruptor of the reproductive endocrine process and behavior of wild birds. However, there is no evidence that ALAN directly disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and no information on the effects of different ALAN intensities on birds. We experimentally tested whether ALAN affects reproductive endocrine activation in the HPG axis of birds, and whether this effect is related to the intensity of ALAN, in wild tree sparrows (Passer montanus). Forty-eight adult female birds were randomly assigned to four groups. They were first exposed to a short light photoperiod (8 h light and 16 h dark per day) for 20 days, then exposed to a long light photoperiod (16 h light and 8 h dark per day) to initiate the reproductive endocrine process. During these two kinds of photoperiod treatments, the four groups of birds were exposed to 0, 85, 150, and 300 lux light in the dark phase (night) respectively. The expression of the reproductive endocrine activation related TSH-β, Dio2 and GnRH-I gene was significantly higher in birds exposed to 85 lux light at night, and significantly lower in birds exposed to 150 and 300 lux, relative to the 0 lux control. The birds exposed to 85 lux had higher peak values of plasma LH and estradiol concentration and reached the peak earlier than birds exposed to 0, 150, or 300 lux did. The lower gene expression of birds exposed to 150 and 300 lux reduced their peak LH and estradiol values, but did not delay the timing of these peaks compared to the control group. These results reveal that low intensity ALAN accelerates the activation of the reproductive endocrine process in the HPG axis, whereas high intensity ALAN retards it.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2281
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Author (down) Zhang, W.; Jiang, L.; Cui, Y.; Xu, Y.; Wang, C.; Yu, J.; Streets, D.G.; Lin, B.
Title Effects of urbanization on airport CO2 emissions: A geographically weighted approach using nighttime light data in China Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Resources, Conservation and Recycling Abbreviated Journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling
Volume 150 Issue Pages 104454
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Regional disparities in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from airports at the city level are of increasing importance for low-carbon development of the civil aviation sector. However, CO2 emissions from airport operations have rarely been estimated and discussed. We investigate the main driving forces of airport CO2 emissions by using Ordinary Least Square (OLS) and Geographically Weighted Regression (GWR) models, separately, to investigate whether urbanization drives airport CO2 emissions and to investigate spatial heterogeneity at the city level. Nighttime light (NTL) data from satellite observations are adopted as a proxy for urbanization. We obtained energy consumption data by end-use purpose for 70 airports in China and calculated the CO2 emissions from on-ground airport operations. The median CO2 emissions of the 70 sample airports are estimated to be 15.9 million tonnes for 2015. Results from the GWR model indicate that airport CO2 emissions are affected by five main factors: urbanization, foreign direct investment, the share of tertiary industry in gross domestic output, passenger turnover of civil aviation and passenger turnover of railways. The elasticity of urbanization shows an increasing trend from the east of China to the west. The spatial heterogeneity of the CO2 emissions of the five airport clusters that are located in five urban agglomerations is discussed. In order to achieve effective reductions of CO2 emissions from airports, policy-makers should consider the spatial heterogeneity of the major driving factors of carbon emissions in different regions to avoid carbon lock-in.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0921-3449 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2657
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Author (down) Zhang, P.; Pan, J.; Xie, L.; Zhou, T.; Bai, H.; Zhu, Y.
Title Spatial–Temporal Evolution and Regional Differentiation Features of Urbanization in China from 2003 to 2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information Abbreviated Journal Ijgi
Volume 8 Issue 1 Pages 31
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Quantifying the temporal and spatial patterns of impervious surfaces (IS) is important for assessing the environmental and ecological impacts of urbanization. In order to better extract IS, and to explore the divergence in urbanization in different regions, research on the regional differentiation features and regional change difference features of IS are required. To extract China’s 2013 urban impervious area, we used the 2013 night light (NTL) data and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) temporal series data, and used three urban impervious surface extraction indexes—Human Settlements Index, Vegetation-Adjusted NTL Urban Index, and the EVI-adjusted NTL index (EANTLI)—which are recognized as the best and most widely used indexes for extracting urban impervious areas. We used the classification results of the Landsat-8 images as the benchmark data to visually compare and verify the results of the urban impervious area extracted by the three indexes. We determined that the EANTLI index better reflects the distribution of the impervious area. Therefore, we used the EANTLI index to extract the urban impervious area from 2003 to 2013 in the study area, and researched the spatial and temporal differentiation in urban IS. The results showed that China’s urban IS area was 70,179.06 km2, accounting for 0.73% of the country’s land area in 2013, compared with 20,565.24 km2 in 2003, which accounted for 0.21% of the land area, representing an increase of 0.52%. On a spatial scale, like economic development, the distribution of urban impervious surfaces was different in different regions. The overall performance of the urban IS percentage was characterized by a decreasing trend from Northwest China, Southwest China, the Middle Reaches of the Yellow River, Northeast China, the Middle Reaches of the Yangtze River, Southern Coastal China, and Northern Coastal China to Eastern Coastal China. On the provincial scale, the urban IS expansion showed considerable differences in different regions. The overall performance of the Urban IS Expansion index showed that the eastern coastal areas had higher values than the western inland areas. The cities or provinces of Beijing, Tianjin, Jiangsu, and Shanghai had the largest growth in impervious areas. Spatially and temporally quantifying the change in urban impervious areas can help to better understand the intensity of urbanization in a region. Therefore, quantifying the change in urban impervious area has an important role in the study of regional environmental and economic development, policy formulation, and the rational use of resources in both time and space.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2220-9964 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2172
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Author (down) Zhang, K.; Zhong, X.; Zhang, G.; Li, D.; Su, Z.; Meng, Y.; Jiang, Y.
Title Thermal Stability Optimization of the Luojia 1-01 Nighttime Light Remote-Sensing Camera's Principal Distance Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Sensors (Basel, Switzerland) Abbreviated Journal Sensors (Basel)
Volume 19 Issue 5 Pages
Keywords Instrumentation
Abstract The instability of the principal distance of the nighttime light remote-sensing camera of the Luojia 1-01 satellite directly affects the geometric accuracy of images, consequently affecting the results of analysis of nighttime light remote-sensing data. Based on the theory of optical passive athermal design, a mathematical model of optical-passive athermal design for principal distance stabilization is established. Positive and negative lenses of different materials and the mechanical structures of different materials are matched to optimize the optical system. According to the index requirements of the Luojia 1-01 camera, an image-telecentric optical system was designed under the guidance of the established mathematical model. In the temperature range of -20 degrees C to +60 degrees C, the principal distance of the system changes from -0.01 mum to +0.28 mum. After on-orbit testing, the geometric accuracy of the designed nighttime light remote-sensing camera is better than 0.20 pixels and less than index requirement of 0.3 pixels, which indicating that the principal distance maintains good stability on-orbit and meets the application requirements of nighttime light remote sensing.
Address School of Remote Sensing and Information Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China. jiangyh@whu.edu.cn
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1424-8220 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:30813556 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2238
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