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Author (down) Łopuszyńska, A.; Bartyna-Zielińska, M.; Kaźmierczak, B.; Jadwiszczak, P.; Kutyłowska, M.; Miller, U. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Lighting of urban green areas – the case of Grabiszyn Park in Wrocław. Searching for the balance between light and darkness through social and technical issues Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication E3S Web of Conferences Abbreviated Journal E3S Web Conf.  
  Volume 100 Issue Pages 00049  
  Keywords Society; Lighting  
  Abstract Illuminating the urban green spaces could lead to conflicts of spatial, technical and social nature. This relatively new, though already global, problem is expected to grow bigger with the further increase of urban areas artificial brightness. The case of Grabiszyn Park in Wrocław is an example of how difficult it is to find a balance between big-city lights and a natural darkness. The situation is even more difficult if the light is not legally recognized as a significant source of air pollution and direct nuisance at the legal level. The aim of the paper is to recognize the broader perspective of urban greenery lighting issues, global recommendations basis and the local awareness. The authors also made an attempt to analyze and assess the project implementation, as well as to characterize the components of the quality of an urban green areas lighting.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2267-1242 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2603  
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Author (down) Zubidat, A.E.; Fares, B.; Fares, F.; Haim, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial Light at Night of Different Spectral Compositions Differentially Affects Tumor Growth in Mice: Interaction With Melatonin and Epigenetic Pathways Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Cancer Control : Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center Abbreviated Journal Cancer Control  
  Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 1073274818812908  
  Keywords Human Health; 6-Smt; Cfl; EE-halogen; GDM-levels; body mass; carbon; corticosterone; cosinor analysis; light at night; yellow-LED  
  Abstract Lighting technology is rapidly advancing toward shorter wavelength illuminations that offer energy-efficient properties. Along with this advantage, the increased use of such illuminations also poses some health challenges, particularly breast cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the effects of artificial light at night (ALAN) of 4 different spectral compositions (500-595 nm) at 350 Lux on melatonin suppression by measuring its urine metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, global DNA methylation, tumor growth, metastases formation, and urinary corticosterone levels in 4T1 breast cancer cell-inoculated female BALB/c mice. The results revealed an inverse dose-dependent relationship between wavelength and melatonin suppression. Short wavelength increased tumor growth, promoted lung metastases formation, and advanced DNA hypomethylation, while long wavelength lessened these effects. Melatonin treatment counteracted these effects and resulted in reduced cancer burden. The wavelength suppression threshold for melatonin-induced tumor growth was 500 nm. These results suggest that short wavelength increases cancer burden by inducing aberrant DNA methylation mediated by the suppression of melatonin. Additionally, melatonin suppression and global DNA methylation are suggested as promising biomarkers for early diagnosis and therapy of breast cancer. Finally, ALAN may manifest other physiological responses such as stress responses that may challenge the survival fitness of the animal under natural environments.  
  Address 1 The Israeli Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Chronobiology, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher SAGE Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language English Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1073-2748 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30477310; PMCID:PMC6259078 Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ john @ Serial 2143  
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Author (down) Zielinska-Dabkowska, K.M.; Xavia, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Global Approaches to Reduce Light Pollution from Media Architecture and Non-Static, Self-Luminous LED Displays for Mixed-Use Urban Developments Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Sustainability Abbreviated Journal Sustainability  
  Volume 11 Issue 12 Pages 3446  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Urban environments have become significantly brighter and more illuminated, and cities now consider media architecture and non-static, self-luminous LED displays an essential element of their strategy to attract residents, visitors, and tourists in the hours after dark. Unfortunately, most often, they are not designed with care, consideration, and awareness, nor do they support the visual wellbeing and circadian rhythms of humans. They also increase light pollution which has an adverse effect on the environment. The aim of this study was to estimate the scale of the negative impact of 28 non-static, self-luminous LED shop window displays within a real-life city context along the main shopping street Banhofstrasse in Zurich, Switzerland. An experimental field measurement survey investigation was performed to identify visual luminance with commonly available tools such as a luminance meter and a digital reflex camera for luminance photography. Moreover, the most important global approaches to reduce light pollution were evaluated in the form of existing guidelines, technical standards, and laws, all of which should be considered when specifying illuminated digital advertisements. A literature review and survey results both confirmed the extent of the problem and highlighted, too, the need to better measure, apply, and manage this new technology. The authors’ proposal for improvements involve practical recommendations for the design and implementation of future projects which can positively guide and direct this growing trend.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2071-1050 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2601  
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Author (down) Zielinska-Dabkowska, K. M., & Schieck, A. F. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Designing digital displays and interactive media in today’s cities by night. Do we know enough about attracting attention to do so? Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Conscious Cities Anthology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Commentary; Lighting  
  Abstract With the huge transformation in the development of digital screen technology and its consistently decreasing cost, digital billboards are progressively replacing traditional static, two-dimensional poster advertisements in our cities1. Previously, due to the substantial expenditure involved, they were only available to major international brands with vast promotional resources to build their brand fame. Today, however, they are being used increasingly by advertisers to deliver all kinds of messages from simple ones to more sophisticated, interactive storytelling. Soon, however, even newer ways of purchasing advertisements using computers will be introduced by the outdoor media industry to address the public, so potentially everybody will be able to rent out available advertising space and communicate the message. But are we ready for this next step? As there are no proper guidelines or regulations in place for this new medium in the urban realm, today we are facing issues such as no integration of the display’s location into the built environment, no specifications based on knowledge of human perception and the human centric design approach, no control over its content quality, and so called ‘display blindness’2 seems to be a common collective urban experience at night. Taking London as one of the most cutting-edge outdoor digital advertising environments in the world3 (with the largest number of these screens traditionally located in or in close proximity to Piccadilly Circus) this paper discusses various aspects of this new medium. Besides the layout and geometry of the space, it also focuses on navigation and attracting the visual attention of passers-by at night in a practical human oriented context. Additionally, questions regarding complex sensory, social, special and interactional issues and the necessity for interdisciplinary collaboration have been addressed.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2351  
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Author (down) Zielinska-Dabkowska, K. M. & Xavia, K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title An overview of the cognitive and biological effects of city nighttime illumination including a London case study Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Centre for Conscious Design Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting  
  Abstract Current scientific research demonstrates how critical the effects of city nighttime illumination are upon cognitive and biological health1 – which needs to be adequately acknowledged, understood and addressed by conscious cities and the plans they develop. Until recent decades, the design of nighttime lighting was determined mostly by electrical engineers who often applied technical standards to meet the requirements of vehicle-focused cities. Unfortunately, consideration of pedestrians and their visual needs to navigate throughout urbanscapes at night were ignored, and so too, was the impact that artificial lighting might have on them, and the environment. Today, the majority of urban city lighting has been installed without full awareness of its impact, and as a result, artificial light at night (ALAN) and light pollution have become an obvious public nuisance, a health risk and an environmental burden2,3. While poor lighting has its drawbacks, a lack of lighting can have many positive aspects, and urban settings can benefit from protecting, preserving and promoting natural darkness. We present two recent planning and design initiatives of London, in the UK, where the quality of light and value of darkness were not given the degree of attention and consideration they deserve. This paper has particular relevance for urban policy makers, city planners, architects, designers, consultants and researchers as it explores the various problems caused by the obvious lack of responsible nighttime illumination.  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2296  
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