toggle visibility Search & Display Options

Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print
  Records Links
Author (down) Waddill, D.G.; Chaney, C.H.; Dutt, R.H. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Ovulation Rate In Gilts After Short-Time Exposure To Continuous Light Type Journal Article
  Year 1968 Publication Reproduction Abbreviated Journal Reproduction  
  Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 123-125  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Ovulation rate in gilts maintained under continuous light (daylight plus 118 to 130 lux of artificial light at night) for a complete oestrous cycle during the spring months was not significantly different from that in gilts maintained under normal daylight. Average ovulation rates were 13·4 for controls and 13·1 for treated gilts. A significant (P<0·01) difference in ovulation rate was found between years.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1470-1626 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2468  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Vowles, A.S.; Kemp, P.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night (ALAN) affects the downstream movement behaviour of the critically endangered European eel, Anguilla anguilla Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Environmental Pollution Abbreviated Journal Environmental Pollution  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is considered one of the most pervasive forms of environmental pollution. It is an emerging threat to freshwater biodiversity and can influence ecologically important behaviours of fish. The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is a critically endangered catadromous species that migrates downstream to the ocean to spawn in the Sargasso Sea. Given the pervasive nature of ALAN, many eel will navigate through artificially lit routes during their seaward migration, and although considered negatively phototactic, their response has yet to be quantified. We investigated the response of downstream moving European eel to simulated ALAN using a Light Emitting Diode unit in an experimental flume. We presented two routes of passage under: (1) a dark control (both channels unlit), (2) low ALAN (treatment channel lit to ca. 5 lx), or (3) high ALAN (treatment channel lit to ca. 20 lx). Eel were: (i) more likely to reject an illuminated route when exposed to high levels of ALAN; (ii) less likely to select the illuminated channel when given a choice; and (iii) passed downstream more rapidly when the illuminated route was selected. This study quantified the response of the critically endangered European eel to ALAN under an experimental setting, providing the foundations for future field based research to validate these findings, and offering insight on the ecological impacts of this major environmental pollutant and driver of global change.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0269-7491 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3313  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Voigt, C.C.; Rehnig, K.; Lindecke, O.; Petersons, G. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Migratory bats are attracted by red light but not by warm-white light: Implications for the protection of nocturnal migrants Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Ecology and Evolution Abbreviated Journal Ecol Evol  
  Volume 8 Issue 18 Pages 9353-9361  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract The replacement of conventional lighting with energy-saving light emitting diodes (LED) is a worldwide trend, yet its consequences for animals and ecosystems are poorly understood. Strictly nocturnal animals such as bats are particularly sensitive to artificial light at night (ALAN). Past studies have shown that bats, in general, respond to ALAN according to the emitted light color and that migratory bats, in particular, exhibit phototaxis in response to green light. As red and white light is frequently used in outdoor lighting, we asked how migratory bats respond to these wavelength spectra. At a major migration corridor, we recorded the presence of migrating bats based on ultrasonic recorders during 10-min light-on/light-off intervals to red or warm-white LED, interspersed with dark controls. When the red LED was switched on, we observed an increase in flight activity for Pipistrellus pygmaeus and a trend for a higher activity for Pipistrellus nathusii. As the higher flight activity of bats was not associated with increased feeding, we rule out the possibility that bats foraged at the red LED light. Instead, bats may have flown toward the red LED light source. When exposed to warm-white LED, general flight activity at the light source did not increase, yet we observed an increased foraging activity directly at the light source compared to the dark control. Our findings highlight a response of migratory bats toward LED light that was dependent on light color. The most parsimonious explanation for the response to red LED is phototaxis and for the response to warm-white LED foraging. Our findings call for caution in the application of red aviation lighting, particularly at wind turbines, as this light color might attract bats, leading eventually to an increased collision risk of migratory bats at wind turbines.  
  Address Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Latvia University of Life Sciences and Technologies Jelgava Latvia  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 2045-7758 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30377506; PMCID:PMC6194273 Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2074  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Voigt, C.C., Scholl, J.M., Bauer, J. et al. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Movement responses of common noctule bats to the illuminated urban landscape Type Journal Article
  Year 2020 Publication Landscape Ecology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 35 Issue Pages 189-201  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Context

Cities are a challenging habitat for obligate nocturnal mammals because of the ubiquitous use of artificial light at night (ALAN). How nocturnal animals move in an urban landscape, particularly in response to ALAN is largely unknown.

Objectives

We studied the movement responses, foraging and commuting, of common noctules (Nyctalus noctula) to urban landscape features in general and ALAN in particular.

Methods

We equipped 20 bats with miniaturized GPS loggers in the Berlin metropolitan area and related spatial positions of bats to anthropogenic and natural landscape features and levels of ALAN.

Results

Common noctules foraged close to ALAN only next to bodies of water or well vegetated areas, probably to exploit swarms of insects lured by street lights. In contrast, they avoided illuminated roads, irrespective of vegetation cover nearby. Predictive maps identified most of the metropolitan area as non-favoured by this species because of high levels of impervious surfaces and ALAN. Dark corridors were used by common noctules for commuting and thus likely improved the permeability of the city landscape.

Conclusions

We conclude that the spatial use of common noctules, previously considered to be more tolerant to light than other bats, is largely constrained by ALAN. Our study is the first individual-based GPS tracking study to show sensitive responses of nocturnal wildlife to light pollution. Approaches to protect urban biodiversity need to include ALAN to safeguard the larger network of dark habitats for bats and other nocturnal species in cities.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2961  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (down) Villarroya-Villalba, L.; Casanelles-Abella, J.; Moretti, M.; Pinho, P.; Samson, R.; Van Mensel, A.; Chiron, F.; Zellweger, F.; Obrist, M.K. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Response of bats and nocturnal insects to urban green areas in Europe Type Journal Article
  Year 2021 Publication Basic and Applied Ecology Abbreviated Journal Basic and Applied Ecology  
  Volume in press Issue Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Remote sensing  
  Abstract Animal biodiversity in cities is generally expected to be uniformly reduced, but recent studies show that this is modulated by the composition and configuration of Urban Green Areas (UGAs). UGAs represent a heterogeneous network of vegetated spaces in urban settings that have repeatedly shown to support a significant part of native diurnal animal biodiversity. However, nocturnal taxa have so far been understudied, constraining our understanding of the role of UGAs on maintaining ecological connectivity and enhancing overall biodiversity. We present a well-replicated multi-city study on the factors driving bat and nocturnal insect biodiversity in three European cities. To achieve this, we sampled bats with ultrasound recorders and flying insects with light traps during the summer of 2018. Results showed a greater abundance and diversity of bats and nocturnal insects in the city of Zurich, followed by Antwerp and Paris. We identified artificial lighting in the UGA to lower bat diversity by probably filtering out light-sensitive species. We also found a negative correlation between both bat activity and diversity and insect abundance, suggesting a top-down control. An in-depth analysis of the Zurich data revealed divergent responses of the nocturnal fauna to landscape variables, while pointing out a bottom-up control of insect diversity on bats. Thus, to effectively preserve biodiversity in urban environments, UGAs management decisions should take into account the combined ecological needs of bats and nocturnal insects and consider the specific spatial topology of UGAs in each city.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 1439-1791 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 3294  
Permanent link to this record
Select All    Deselect All
 |   | 
Details
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: