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Author (down) Wood, J.M. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nighttime driving: visual, lighting and visibility challenges Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics : the Journal of the British College of Ophthalmic Opticians (Optometrists) Abbreviated Journal Ophthalmic Physiol Opt  
  Volume Issue Pages in press  
  Keywords Review; Public Safety; headlights; nighttime driving; older drivers; pedestrians and cyclists; streetlights; visual performance  
  Abstract PURPOSE: Nighttime driving is dangerous and is one of the most challenging driving situations for most drivers. Fatality rates are higher at night than in the day when adjusted for distances travelled, particularly for crashes involving pedestrians and cyclists. Although there are multiple contributory factors, the low light levels at night are believed to be the major cause of collisions with pedestrians and cyclists at night, most likely due to their reduced visibility. Understanding the visibility problems involved in nighttime driving is thus critical, given the increased risk to road safety. RECENT FINDINGS: This review discusses research that highlights key differences in the nighttime road environment compared to the day and how this affects visual function and driving performance, together with an overview of studies investigating how driver age and visual status affect nighttime driving performance. Research that has focused on the visibility of vulnerable road users at nighttime (pedestrians and cyclists) is also included. SUMMARY: Collectively, the research evidence suggests that visual function is reduced under the mesopic lighting conditions of night driving and that these effects are exacerbated by increasing age and visual impairment. Light and glare from road lighting and headlights have significant impacts on vision and night driving and these effects are likely to change with evolving technologies, such as LED streetlighting and headlights. Research also highlights the importance of the visibility of vulnerable road users at night and the role of retroreflective clothing in the 'biomotion' configuration for improving their conspicuity and hence safety.  
  Address School of Optometry and Vision Science and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0275-5408 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:31875993 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2803  
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Author (down) Wojnicki, I., Komnata, K., & Kotulski, L. url  openurl
  Title Comparative Study of Road Lighting Efficiency in the Context of CEN/TR 13201 2004 and 2014 Lighting Standards and Dynamic Control Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Energies Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 12 Issue 8 Pages 1-14  
  Keywords Economics; Energy; Lighting; Planning  
  Abstract This paper presents a comparative study of differences in energy consumption while applying 2004 and 2014 releases of the CEN/TR 13201 standard for lighting designs. Street lighting optimal design and its optimization is discussed. To provide a reliable comparison, optimal designs for a given representative set of streets were calculated. The optimization was performed by newly developed software. As a test bed, a set of streets was selected with varying physical and traffic characteristics. The energy consumption was measured on the same set of streets both statically, which assumed the same lighting levels throughout night, and with a dynamic control, which adjusted lighting based on traffic intensity. For experiments with the dynamic control, one year of traffic intensity data were used. The findings confirm increased economical impact of dynamic control for the 2014 standard, which results in significant energy saving.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2348  
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Author (down) Wittenbrink, N.; Ananthasubramaniam, B.; Munch, M.; Koller, B.; Maier, B.; Weschke, C.; Bes, F.; de Zeeuw, J.; Nowozin, C.; Wahnschaffe, A.; Wisniewski, S.; Zaleska, M.; Bartok, O.; Ashwal-Fluss, R.; Lammert, H.; Herzel, H.; Hummel, M.; Kadener, S.; Kunz, D.; Kramer, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Title High-accuracy determination of internal circadian time from a single blood sample Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication The Journal of Clinical Investigation Abbreviated Journal J Clin Invest  
  Volume 128 Issue 9 Pages 3826-3839  
  Keywords Human Health  
  Abstract BACKGROUND: The circadian clock is a fundamental and pervasive biological program that coordinates 24-hour rhythms in physiology, metabolism, and behavior, and it is essential to health. Whereas therapy adapted to time of day is increasingly reported to be highly successful, it needs to be personalized, since internal circadian time is different for each individual. In addition, internal time is not a stable trait, but is influenced by many factors, including genetic predisposition, age, sex, environmental light levels, and season. An easy and convenient diagnostic tool is currently missing. METHODS: To establish a validated test, we followed a 3-stage biomarker development strategy: (a) using circadian transcriptomics of blood monocytes from 12 individuals in a constant routine protocol combined with machine learning approaches, we identified biomarkers for internal time; and these biomarkers (b) were migrated to a clinically relevant gene expression profiling platform (NanoString) and (c) were externally validated using an independent study with 28 early or late chronotypes. RESULTS: We developed a highly accurate and simple assay (BodyTime) to estimate the internal circadian time in humans from a single blood sample. Our assay needs only a small set of blood-based transcript biomarkers and is as accurate as the current gold standard method, dim-light melatonin onset, at smaller monetary, time, and sample-number cost. CONCLUSION: The BodyTime assay provides a new diagnostic tool for personalization of health care according to the patient's circadian clock. FUNDING: This study was supported by the Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung, Germany (FKZ: 13N13160 and 13N13162) and Intellux GmbH, Germany.  
  Address Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, corporate member of Freie Universitat Berlin, Humboldt-Universitat zu Berlin, and Berlin Institute of Health, Laboratory of Chronobiology, Berlin, Germany  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0021-9738 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29953415; PMCID:PMC6118629 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2194  
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Author (down) Witkowski, P., & Korzeniewska, E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Comparative analysis of HPS and LED luminaries in terms of effectiveness of greenhouse plant lighting and light emission Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication IEEE Xplore Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Lighting; Light emitting diodes; LED; Lighting; Sodium; Electromagnetics; Light sources; Color; Production  
  Abstract The article focuses on the analysis of the parameters of light sources, spectrum characteristics of HPS and LED lighting to achieve the best results in greenhouse cultivation with the least energy consumption, and the escape of light into space. The authors have compared both sodium HPS and LED luminaries in the aspect of colour light efficiency and their influence on the plant vegetation process.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number IDA @ intern @ Serial 2646  
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Author (down) Winger, B.M.; Weeks, B.C.; Farnsworth, A.; Jones, A.W.; Hennen, M.; Willard, D.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Nocturnal flight-calling behaviour predicts vulnerability to artificial light in migratory birds Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Proceedings. Biological Sciences Abbreviated Journal Proc Biol Sci  
  Volume 286 Issue 1900 Pages 20190364  
  Keywords animals  
  Abstract Understanding interactions between biota and the built environment is increasingly important as human modification of the landscape expands in extent and intensity. For migratory birds, collisions with lighted structures are a major cause of mortality, but the mechanisms behind these collisions are poorly understood. Using 40 years of collision records of passerine birds, we investigated the importance of species' behavioural ecologies in predicting rates of building collisions during nocturnal migration through Chicago, IL and Cleveland, OH, USA. We found that the use of nocturnal flight calls is an important predictor of collision risk in nocturnally migrating passerine birds. Species that produce flight calls during nocturnal migration tended to collide with buildings more than expected given their local abundance, whereas those that do not use such communication collided much less frequently. Our results suggest that a stronger attraction response to artificial light at night in species that produce flight calls may mediate these differences in collision rates. Nocturnal flight calls probably evolved to facilitate collective decision-making during navigation, but this same social behaviour may now exacerbate vulnerability to a widespread anthropogenic disturbance. Our results also suggest that social behaviour during migration may reflect poorly understood differences in navigational mechanisms across lineages of birds.  
  Address 4 Gantz Family Collections Center, The Field Museum , 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 , USA  
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:30940055 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2287  
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