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Author (up) Agnew, J.; Gillespie, T.W.; Gonzalez, J.; Min, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Baghdad Nights: Evaluating the US Military ‘Surge’ Using Nighttime Light Signatures Type Journal Article
  Year 2008 Publication Environment and Planning A Abbreviated Journal Environ Plan A  
  Volume 40 Issue 10 Pages 2285-2295  
  Keywords Remote Sensing; Commentary  
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  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN 0308-518X ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2028  
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Author (up) Alaasam, V.J.; Duncan, R.; Casagrande, S.; Davies, S.; Sidher, A.; Seymoure, B.; Shen, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Ouyang, J.Q. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Light at night disrupts nocturnal rest and elevates glucocorticoids at cool color temperatures Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Experimental Zoology. Part A, Ecological and Integrative Physiology Abbreviated Journal J Exp Zool A Ecol Integr Physiol  
  Volume 329 Issue 8-9 Pages 465-472  
  Keywords Animals  
  Abstract Nighttime light pollution is quickly becoming a pervasive, global concern. Since the invention and proliferation of light-emitting diodes (LED), it has become common for consumers to select from a range of color temperatures of light with varying spectra. Yet, the biological impacts of these different spectra on organisms remain unclear. We tested if nighttime illumination of LEDs, at two commercially available color temperatures (3000 and 5000 K) and at ecologically relevant illumination levels affected body condition, food intake, locomotor activity, and glucocorticoid levels in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). We found that individuals exposed to 5000 K light had higher rates of nighttime activity (peaking after 1 week of treatment) compared to 3000 K light and controls (no nighttime light). Birds in the 5000 K treatment group also had increased corticosterone levels from pretreatment levels compared to 3000 K and control groups but no changes in body condition or food intake. Individuals that were active during the night did not consequently decrease daytime activity. This study adds to the growing evidence that the spectrum of artificial light at night is important, and we advocate the use of nighttime lighting with warmer color temperatures of 3000 K instead of 5000 K to decrease energetic costs for avian taxa.  
  Address Department of Biology, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada  
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  ISSN 2471-5638 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes PMID:29766666 Approved no  
  Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 1909  
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Author (up) Alessandro Manfrin, Gabriel Singer, Stefano Larsen, Nadine Weiss, Roy H. A. van Grunsven, Nina-Sophie Weiss, Stefanie Wohlfahrt, Michael T. Monaghan and Franz Hölker url  doi
openurl 
  Title Artificial light at night affects organism flux across ecosystem boundaries and drives community structure in the recipient ecosystem Type Journal Article
  Year 2017 Publication Frontiers in Environmental Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 61 Pages  
  Keywords Animals; Ecology  
  Abstract Artificial light at night (ALAN) is a widespread alteration of the natural environment that can affect the functioning of ecosystems. ALAN can change the movement patterns of freshwater animals that move into the adjacent riparian and terrestrial ecosystems, but the implications for local riparian consumers that rely on these subsidies are still unexplored. We conducted a two-year field experiment to quantify changes of freshwater-terrestrial linkages by installing streetlights in a previously light-native riparian area adjacent to an agricultural drainage ditch. We compared the abundance and community composition of emerging aquatic insects, flying insects, and ground-dwelling arthropods with an unlit control site. Comparisons were made within and between years using generalized least squares and a BACI design (Before-After Control-Impact). Aquatic insect emergence, the proportion of flying insects that were aquatic in origin, and the total abundance of flying insects all increased in the ALAN-illuminated area. The abundance of several night-active ground-dwelling predators (Pachygnatha clercki, Trochosa sp., Opiliones) increased under ALAN and their activity was extended into the day. Conversely, the abundance of nocturnal ground beetles (Carabidae) decreased under ALAN. The changes in composition of riparian predator and scavenger communities suggest that the increase in aquatic-to-terrestrial subsidy flux may cascade through the riparian food web. The work is among the first studies to experimentally manipulate ALAN using a large-scale field experiment, and provides evidence that ALAN can affect processes that link adjacent ecosystems. Given the large number of streetlights that are installed along shorelines of freshwater bodies throughout the globe, the effects could be widespread and represent an underestimated source of impairment for both aquatic and riparian systems.  
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  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1746  
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Author (up) Amavilah, V.H. url  openurl
  Title Artificial nighttime lights and the “real” well-being of nations : “Measuring economic growth from outer space” and welfare from right here on Earth Type Journal Article
  Year 2018 Publication Journal of Economics and Political Economy Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 209-218  
  Keywords Economics; Remote Sensing  
  Abstract GDP remains too much of an imprecise measure of the standard of living. There

is a need for either substitutes or complements. Nighttime lights are a reasonable indicator of the extent, scale, and intensity of socio-economic activities, but a poor measure of national welfare. However, if nighttime lights are understood to constitute externalities, then their effects can be used to adjust measured growth for welfare. From that angle, nighttime lights appear to exert sub-optimal positive externalities in developing countries, and supra-optimal negative externality in developed countries. This means that even if we assume equal growth rates in developing and developed countries, welfare is enhanced by increasing nighttime lights in developing countries and reduced by increasing nighttime lights in developed countries.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number NC @ ehyde3 @ Serial 2099  
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Author (up) Apostol, K.; Dumroese, R.K.; Pinto, J.R.; Davis, A.S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Response of conifer species from three latitudinal populations to light spectra generated by light-emitting diodes and high-pressure sodium lamps Type Journal Article
  Year 2015 Publication Canadian Journal of Forest Research Abbreviated Journal Can. J. For. Res.  
  Volume 45 Issue 12 Pages 1711-1719  
  Keywords plants  
  Abstract Light-emitting diode (LED) technology shows promise for supplementing photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in forest nurseries because of the potential reduction in energy consumption and an ability to supply discrete wavelengths to optimize seedling growth. Our objective was to examine the effects of light spectra supplied by LED and traditional high-pressure sodium (HPS) lamps on growth and physiology of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir) and Picea engelmannii (Engelmann spruce) seedlings. We used three latitudinal sources for each species: British Columbia (BC), Idaho (ID), and New Mexico (NM). Container seedlings were grown for 17 weeks in the greenhouse under an 18-h photoperiod of ambient solar light supplemented with light delivered from HPS or LED. In general, seedlings grown under LED had significantly greater growth, gas exchange rates, and chlorophyll contents than those seedlings grown under HPS. The growth and physiological responses to supplemental lighting varied greatly among species and seed sources. Generally, LED-grown seedlings from BC had the greatest growth and tissue dry matter followed by ID and NM populations. Compared with HPS, the significant increase in seedling growth and concomitant energy savings with LED (29% energy consumption relative to HPS) demonstrates the promise of using LED as PAR supplemental lighting for container seedling production.  
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  ISSN 0045-5067 ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number LoNNe @ kyba @ Serial 1250  
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