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Author (up) Chen, J.; Zhao, F.; Zeng, N.; Oda, T.
Title Comparing a global high-resolution downscaled fossil fuel CO2 emission dataset to local inventory-based estimates over 14 global cities Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Carbon Balance and Management Abbreviated Journal Carbon Balance Manag
Volume 15 Issue 1 Pages 9
Keywords Remote Sensing; City CO2 emissions; Emission inventory; Fossil fuel CO2 emissions; In-boundary; Odiac
Abstract BACKGROUND: Compilation of emission inventories (EIs) for cities is a whole new challenge to assess the subnational climate mitigation effort under the Paris Climate Agreement. Some cities have started compiling EIs, often following a global community protocol. However, EIs are often difficult to systematically examine because of the ways they were compiled (data collection and emission calculation) and reported (sector definition and direct vs consumption). In addition, such EI estimates are not readily applicable to objective evaluation using modeling and observations due to the lack of spatial emission extents. City emission estimates used in the science community are often based on downscaled gridded EIs, while the accuracy of the downscaled emissions at city level is not fully assessed. RESULTS: This study attempts to assess the utility of the downscaled emissions at city level. We collected EIs from 14 major global cities and compare them to the estimates from a global high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 emission data product (ODIAC) commonly used in the science research community. We made necessary adjustments to the estimates to make our comparison as reasonable as possible. We found that the two methods produce very close area-wide emission estimates for Shanghai and Delhi (< 10% difference), and reach good consistency in half of the cities examined (< 30% difference). The ODIAC dataset exhibits a much higher emission compared to inventory estimates in Cape Town (+ 148%), Sao Paulo (+ 43%) and Beijing (+ 40%), possibly related to poor correlation between nightlight intensity with human activity, such as the high-emission and low-lighting industrial parks in developing countries. On the other hand, ODIAC shows lower estimates in Manhattan (- 62%), New York City (- 45%), Washington D.C. (- 42%) and Toronto (- 33%), all located in North America, which may be attributable to an underestimation of residential emissions from heating in ODIAC's nightlight-based approach, and an overestimation of emission from ground transportation in registered vehicles statistics of inventory estimates. CONCLUSIONS: The relatively good agreement suggests that the ODIAC data product could potentially be used as a first source for prior estimate of city-level CO2 emission, which is valuable for atmosphere CO2 inversion modeling and comparing with satellite CO2 observations. Our compilation of in-boundary emission estimates for 14 cities contributes towards establishing an accurate inventory in-boundary global city carbon emission dataset, necessary for accountable local climate mitigation policies in the future.
Address Goddard Earth Sciences Research and Technology, Universities Space Research Association, Columbia, MD, USA
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1750-0680 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes PMID:32430547 Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2929
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Author (up) Chen, M.; Zhang, S.
Title Measuring the regional non-observed economy in China with nighttime lights Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication International Journal of Emerging Markets Abbreviated Journal Ijoem
Volume in press Issue Pages
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Purpose

The non-observed economy (NOE) is a pervasive phenomenon worldwide, especially in developing countries, but the size of the NOE and its contributions to the overall economy are usually unknown. This paper presents an estimation of the average size of the NOE for the 31 provincial regions in China between 1992 and 2013.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) nighttime light data combined with 11 existing surveys on or measurements of NOE for 191 countries or regions throughout the world, to measure the size of the NOE.

Findings

The results show that the NOE share is unevenly distributed among China's provincial regions, with the smallest being 3.19% for Beijing and the largest being 69.71% for Ningxia. The national average is 43.11%, while the figures for the eastern region, middle region, northeastern region and western region are 39.3%, 47.6%, 44.7% and 43.6%, respectively. The NOE estimates are negatively correlated with the measured gross domestic product (GDP) and GDP per capita, which suggests that developed regions tend to have less NOE.

Originality/value

The nighttime lights are used to measure the NOE for China's provincial regions. Compared with traditional databases, one of the prominent features of nighttime lights is its objectivity, as there is little human interference; therefore, it can be used to achieve more accurate results.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1746-8809 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2936
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Author (up) Chen, Q.; Ru, T.; Zhai, D.; Huang, X.; Li, Y.; Qian, L.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, G.
Title Half a century of Lighting Research & Technology: A bibliometric review Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Lighting Research & Technology Abbreviated Journal Lighting Research & Technology
Volume in press Issue Pages 1477153519857788
Keywords History; Lighting; Review
Abstract Lighting Research & Technology (LRT) is an influential journal in the field of light and lighting dating back to 1969. To celebrate its 50th birthday, the current study explored its bibliometric characteristics and mapped the bibliographic information graphically through VOSviewer software. This analysis found that the number of papers has steadily increased during recent years. The most productive and cited country was the United Kingdom. The most productive and cited institution was Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. The most prolific author was Steve Fotios and the most cited author was Mark Rea. The journal most cited together with LRT was Leukos. LRT has become more and more international and interdisciplinary over the last five decades. Suggestions for the development of LRT are provided. Develpoments over the last 50 years have turned LRT into one of leading journals in the light and lighting field, one which has a bright future.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1477-1535 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2573
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Author (up) Chen, S.; Li, W.; Yang, S.; Zhang, B.; Li, T.; Du, Y.; Yang, M.; Zhao, H.
Title Evaluation method and reduction measures for the flicker effect in road lighting using fixed Low Mounting Height Luminaires Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology Abbreviated Journal Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology
Volume 93 Issue Pages 103101
Keywords Lighting; Vision
Abstract Low Mounting Height Luminaires (LMHL) are used in many cities on viaducts, cross-sea and cross-river bridges due to their unique advantages. However, the flicker effect is an important factor that needs to be considered in road lighting using fixed LMHL. At present, there are not many researchers in the field of international lighting. Previous types of road lighting design were based on the method of the tunnel lighting flicker effect. At the same time, the flicker effect is mainly based on the subjective feelings of people but is not quantified. In this paper, the Flicker Index (FI) is calculated by measuring the parameters of streetlamps to evaluation flicker effect. Secondly, the suggestion to offset the flicker effect in CIE 88-2004 “Guide for the Lighting of Road Tunnels and Underpasses” is to limit the speed of the vehicle and adjust the road light spacing to avoid the flicker sensitive area on human eyes, while ignoring the essential problem of how the flicker effect is generated through the energy level of the stimulating optical signal. Two factors affecting the strength of the flicker effect are proposed: energy ratio and duty cycle. The duty cycle, in time, refers to the proportion of the strong and weak flashing signals during the period; in space, it refers to the proportional relationship between the length of the luminaire and the distance between the lamps, which is related to the running speed of the vehicle. It is consistent with the CIE recommendations for flicker. Thirdly, the essence of the flicker effect is the problem of the energy level of the stimulus signal. This study investigated the reduction in the brightness of the light source, hence reducing the energy of the visual stimulation signal to the human eye in order to judge the degree of fatigue in human vision. The experimental results show that the degree of fatigue in human vision decreases when the brightness of the experimental light source decreases. Therefore, the key to changing the flicker effect of LMHL is to reduce the contrast between the surface brightness of the luminaire and the brightness of the spatial background.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 0886-7798 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2663
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Author (up) Chen, Shanshan; Hu, Deyong
Title Parameterizing Anthropogenic Heat Flux with an Energy-Consumption Inventory and Multi-Source Remote Sensing Data Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Remote Sensing Abbreviated Journal Remote Sensing
Volume 9 Issue 11 Pages 1165
Keywords Remote Sensing
Abstract Anthropogenic heat (AH) generated by human activities is an important factor affecting the urban climate. Thus, refined AH parameterization of a large area can provide data support for regional meteorological research. In this study, we developed a refined anthropogenic heat flux (RAHF) parameterization scheme to estimate the gridded anthropogenic heat flux (AHF). Firstly, the annual total AH emissions and annual mean AHF of Beijing municipality in the year 2015 were estimated using a top-down, energy-consumption inventory method, which was derived based on socioeconomic statistics and energy consumption data. The heat released from industry, transportation, buildings (including both commercial and residential buildings), and human metabolism were taken into account. Then, the county-scale AHF estimation model was constructed based on multi-source remote sensing data, such as Suomi national polar-orbiting partnership (Suomi-NPP) visible infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS) nighttime light (NTL) data and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. This model was applied to estimate the annual mean AHF of the counties in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region. Finally, the gridded AHF data with 500-m resolution was obtained using a RAHF parameterization scheme. The results indicate that the annual total AH emissions of Beijing municipality in the year 2015 was approximately 1.704 × 1018 J. Of this, the buildings contribute about 34.5%, followed by transportation and industry with about 30.5% and 30.1%, respectively, and human metabolism with only about 4.9%. The annual mean AHF value of the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region is about 6.07 W·m−2, and the AHF in urban areas is about in the range of 20 W·m−2 and 130 W·m−2. The maximum AHF value is approximately 130.84 W·m−2, mostly in airports, railway stations, central business districts, and other densely-populated areas. The error analysis of the county-scale AHF results showed that the residual between the model estimation and energy consumption statistics is less than 1%. In addition, the spatial distribution of RAHF results is generally centered on urban area and gradually decreases towards suburbs. The spatial pattern of the RAHF results within urban areas corresponds well to the distribution of population density, building density, and the industrial district. The spatial heterogeneity of AHF within urban areas is well-reflected through the RAHF results. The RAHF results can be used in meteorological and environmental modeling for the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei region. The results of this study also highlight the superiority of Suomi-NPP VIIRS NTL data for AHF estimation.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 2072-4292 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number GFZ @ kyba @ Serial 2342
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